31

I have a list that contains a mixture of positive and negative numbers, as the following

lst = [1, -2, 10, -12, -4, -5, 9, 2]

What I am trying to accomplish is to sort the list with the positive numbers coming before the negative numbers, respectively sorted as well.

Desired output:

[1, 2, 9, 10, -12, -5, -4, -2]

I was able to figure out the first part sorting with the positive numbers coming before the and negative numbers, unfortunately this does not respectively sort the positive and negative numbers.

lst = [1, -2, 10, -12, -4, -5, 9, 2]
lst = sorted(lst, key=lambda o: not abs(o) == o)
print(lst)

>>> [1, 10, 2, 9, -2, -12, -4, -5]

How may I achieve my desired sorting with a pythonic solution?

11 Answers 11

62

You could just use a regular sort, and then bisect the list at 0:

>>> lst
[1, -2, 10, -12, -4, -5, 9, 2]
>>> from bisect import bisect
>>> lst.sort()
>>> i = bisect(lst, 0)  # use `bisect_left` instead if you want zeroes first
>>> lst[i:] + lst[:i]
[1, 2, 9, 10, -12, -5, -4, -2]

The last line here takes advantage of a slice invariant lst == lst[:n] + lst[n:]

Another option would be to use a tuple as a sort key, and rely on lexicographical ordering of tuples:

>>> sorted(lst, key=lambda x: (x<0, x))  # use <= instead if you want zeroes last
[1, 2, 9, 10, -12, -5, -4, -2]
  • I really like both of these options, especially the bisect – Jon Taylor Nov 15 '16 at 22:28
  • Best way to do it – Moinuddin Quadri Nov 15 '16 at 22:31
  • Could someone explain to me how that lambda works? (Or just link me to where I can read about that behavior?) – Elliot Roberts Nov 15 '16 at 22:31
  • 1
    hmmm, after being curious on how come and numpy arrays are slower, it turns out that if your list is "small" then bisect is faster, however, if it is large then numpy is faster. – John Smith Nov 15 '16 at 23:50
  • 1
    What does this do in the event the list contains 0? – jpmc26 Nov 17 '16 at 21:55
9

Just comparing the different ways.

Results:

> Shuffle cost comparison small
shuffle_lst: 0.001181483967229724
shuffle_ar: 0.014688121969811618
> Shuffle cost comparison medium
shuffle_lst: 0.572294642101042
shuffle_ar: 0.3266364939045161
> Shuffle cost comparison large
shuffle_lst: 26.5786890439922
shuffle_ar: 6.284286553971469

                    +cost               -cost
bisectme:    0.004252934013493359    0.003071450046263635
lexicon:     0.010936842067167163    0.009755358099937439
compreh.:    0.0071560649666935205   0.005974580999463797
arrayme:     0.03787591797299683     0.023187796003185213
nplexicon:   0.022204622975550592    0.007516501005738974
npbisect:    0.023507782025262713    0.008819660055451095

                    +cost               -cost
bisectme:    7.716002315981314   7.143707673880272
lexicon:     22.17862514301669   21.606330500915647
compreh.:    8.690494343056343   8.118199700955302
arrayme:     1.5029839979251847      1.1763475040206686
nplexicon:   2.0811527019832283      1.7545162080787122
npbisect:    1.3076487149810418      0.9810122210765257

                    +cost               -cost
bisectme:    180.77819497592282      154.19950593193062
arrayme:     22.476932613993995      16.192646060022525
nplexicon:   41.74795828794595   35.46367173397448
npbisect:    20.13856932707131   13.85428277309984

Code:

import sys
import numpy as np
from timeit import timeit
from bisect import bisect
from random import shuffle

def shuffle_lst():
    np.random.shuffle(lst)

def shuffle_ar():
    np.random.shuffle(ar)

def bisectme():
    np.random.shuffle(lst)
    lst.sort()
    i = bisect(lst, 0)
    return lst[i:] + lst[:i]

def lexicon():
    np.random.shuffle(lst)
    return sorted(lst, key=lambda x: (x < 0, x))

def comprehension():
    np.random.shuffle(lst)
    return sorted([i for i in lst if i > 0]) + sorted([i for i in lst if i < 0])

def arrayme():
    np.random.shuffle(ar)
    return np.concatenate([np.sort(ar[ar >= 0]), np.sort(ar[ar < 0])], axis=0)

def nplexicon():
    np.random.shuffle(ar)
    return ar[np.lexsort((ar, ar < 0))]

def numpybisect():
    np.random.shuffle(ar)
    ar.sort()
    i = ar.__abs__().argmin()
    return np.concatenate((ar[i:], ar[:i]))


nloops = 1000

lst = list(range(-10**1, 0, 1)) + list(range(10**1, -1, -1))
ar = np.array(lst)
print("> Shuffle cost comparison small")
cost_shuffle_list_small = timeit(shuffle_lst, number=nloops)
print("shuffle_lst:", cost_shuffle_list_small)
cost_shuffle_array_small = timeit(shuffle_ar, number=nloops)
print("shuffle_ar:", cost_shuffle_array_small)

lst = list(range(-10**4, 0, 1)) + list(range(10**4, -1, -1))
ar = np.array(lst)
print("> Shuffle cost comparison medium")
cost_shuffle_list_medium = timeit(shuffle_lst, number=nloops)
print("shuffle_lst:", cost_shuffle_list_medium)
cost_shuffle_array_medium = timeit(shuffle_ar, number=nloops)
print("shuffle_ar:", cost_shuffle_array_medium)

nloops = 100

lst = list(range(-10**6, 0, 1)) + list(range(10**6, -1, -1))
ar = np.array(lst)
print("> Shuffle cost comparison large")
cost_shuffle_list_large = timeit(shuffle_lst, number=nloops)
print("shuffle_lst:", cost_shuffle_list_large)
cost_shuffle_array_large = timeit(shuffle_ar, number=nloops)
print("shuffle_ar:", cost_shuffle_array_large)

print()

nloops = 1000

## With small lists/arrays
lst = list(range(-10**1, 0, 1)) + list(range(10**1, -1, -1))
ar = np.array(lst)

print("\t\t\t\t\tw/o pen.\t\t\t\tw. pen.")

foo = timeit(bisectme, number=nloops)
print("bisectme:\t", foo, "\t", foo - cost_shuffle_list_small)

foo = timeit(lexicon, number=nloops)
print("lexicon:\t", foo, "\t", foo - cost_shuffle_list_small)

foo = timeit(comprehension, number=nloops)
print("compreh.:\t", foo, "\t", foo - cost_shuffle_list_small)

foo = timeit(arrayme, number=nloops)
print("arrayme:\t", foo, "\t", foo - cost_shuffle_array_small)

foo = timeit(nplexicon, number=nloops)
print("nplexicon:\t", foo, "\t", foo - cost_shuffle_array_small)

foo = timeit(numpybisect, number=nloops)
print("npbisect:\t", foo, "\t",  foo - cost_shuffle_array_small)

print()

## With medium lists/arrays
lst = list(range(-10**4, 0, 1)) + list(range(10**4, -1, -1))
ar = np.array(lst)

print("\t\t\t\t\tw/o cost\t\t\t\tw. cost")

foo = timeit(bisectme, number=nloops)
print("bisectme:\t", foo, "\t", foo - cost_shuffle_list_medium)

foo = timeit(lexicon, number=nloops)
print("lexicon:\t", foo, "\t", foo - cost_shuffle_list_medium)

foo = timeit(comprehension, number=nloops)
print("compreh.:\t", foo, "\t", foo - cost_shuffle_list_medium)

foo = timeit(arrayme, number=nloops)
print("arrayme:\t", foo, "\t", foo - cost_shuffle_array_medium)

foo = timeit(nplexicon, number=nloops)
print("nplexicon:\t", foo, "\t", foo - cost_shuffle_array_medium)

foo = timeit(numpybisect, number=nloops)
print("npbisect:\t", foo, "\t",  foo - cost_shuffle_array_medium)

print()


## With large lists/arrays
nloops = 100

lst = list(range(-10**6, 0, 1)) + list(range(10**6, -1, -1))
ar = np.array(lst)

print("\t\t\t\t\tw/o cost\t\t\t\tw. cost")

foo = timeit(bisectme, number=nloops)
print("bisectme:\t", foo, "\t", foo - cost_shuffle_list_large)

foo = timeit(arrayme, number=nloops)
print("arrayme:\t", foo, "\t", foo - cost_shuffle_array_large)

foo = timeit(nplexicon, number=nloops)
print("nplexicon:\t", foo, "\t", foo - cost_shuffle_array_large)

foo = timeit(numpybisect, number=nloops)
print("npbisect:\t", foo, "\t",  foo - cost_shuffle_array_large)

print()
  • 1np.sort(ar)` takes 3/4 of the time; only 1/4 is spent on the masking and concatenation. – hpaulj Nov 16 '16 at 3:12
  • 2
    I'm not sure about the fairness of the fact that 1) the list is presorted and 2) even if it weren't, bisectme sorts the list in place, affecting all following tests. – jpmc26 Nov 16 '16 at 4:44
  • 1
    2*10^2=200, and 200 is much easier to read and write. But it does makes you look very smart when you write 2*10^2. – Tsahi Asher Nov 16 '16 at 14:50
  • @JohnSmith This still sorts the list on the first loop and then it's sorted for all subsequent loops. This may unfairly advantage the in place sorts. Each loop really needs it's own copy. – jpmc26 Nov 16 '16 at 16:17
  • argh yes... misinterpreted, you mean each loop of the timeit... true... moved the shuffle in each of the functions... that will take a while to run... will update when finishes – John Smith Nov 16 '16 at 17:06
6

Create two lists, one with positive value and another with the negative values and then sort the content of each list the way you like. For example:

my_list = [1, -2, 10, -12, -4, -5, 9, 2]
pos_list, neg_list = [], []
for item in my_list:
    if item < 0: 
        neg_list.append(item)
    else:
        pos_list.append(item)

final_list = sorted(pos_list) + sorted(neg_list)
5

You could just sort by the negative of the element's inverse:

from __future__ import division

sorted(lst, key=lambda i: 0 if i == 0 else -1 / i)

Taking the inverse switches the order of the magnitudes (larger numbers in the middle, smaller on the outside). Taking the negative reverses the order (positives first, negatives last).

Be aware of the size of your numbers of course and if they'll cause any over- or underflow issues.

  • that's also slow (~60s) for 2*10^4 unsorted lists like above – John Smith Nov 16 '16 at 10:12
  • @JohnSmith Yes, not super fast, but simple and pretty intuitive. – jpmc26 Nov 16 '16 at 16:17
  • 1
    Clever idea! A glance at the graph of f(x) = -1/x helped me to understand how this works. – wim Nov 17 '16 at 5:17
4

Create two separate list. One positive values one with negative values. sort the negative list, then concatenate them together:

>>> lst = [1, -2, 10, -12, -4, -5, 9, 2]
>>> sorted([i for i in lst if i > 0]) + sorted([i for i in lst if i =< 0])
[1, 2, 9, 10, -12, -5, -4, -2]
>>> 
  • Sort the first list too right? – Elliot Roberts Nov 15 '16 at 22:35
  • 5
    One of your comparisons should check against 0 too, >= 0 or <= 0 to include zeros also. – pilkch Nov 16 '16 at 2:18
  • @pilkch Your right thanks. – Christian Dean Nov 16 '16 at 13:48
3
import numpy as np

l = np.array([1, -2, 10, -12, -4, -5, 9, 2])
l[np.lexsort((l, l < 0))]

array([  1,   2,   9,  10, -12,  -5,  -4,  -2])
3
import numpy as np
lst = [1, -2, 10, -12, -4, -5, 9, 2]
ar = np.array(lst)
lst = list(np.concatenate([np.sort(ar[ar >= 0]), np.sort(ar[ar < 0], reverse = True)], axis = 0))
print(lst)

And if you don't have to use a list but are happy with numpy arrays then you don't have to pay the costs of casting, i.e.

import numpy as np
ar = np.array([1, -2, 10, -12, -4, -5, 9, 2])
ar = np.concatenate([np.sort(ar[ar >= 0]), np.sort(ar[ar < 0])], axis = 0)
print(ar)
  • 1
    While numpy appears to be a great module, it seems like it is overkill with what I am trying to accomplish – Wondercricket Nov 15 '16 at 23:13
  • hmmm, after being curious on how come and numpy arrays are slower, it turns out that if your list is "small" then bisect is faster, however, if it is large then numpy is faster. – John Smith Nov 15 '16 at 23:50
2

Kudos to wmin for the logic of his solution (accepted answer) which is great. So for completeness, a similar answer to this but based on numpy, which is significantly faster for anything else other than small lists/arrays, is as follows:

lst = [1, -2, 10, -12, -4, -5, 9, 2]
ar = np.array(lst)
ar.sort()
i = ar.__abs__().argmin()
np.concatenate((ar[i:], ar[:i]))
2

I don't know if it's the most Pythonic, and it certainly does not have any bells-and-whistles, but IMO it's a clear and understandable code:

lst = [1, -2, 10, -12, -4, -5, 9, 2]

pos = list()
neg = list()

for i in lst:
    neg.append(i) if i < 0 else pos.append(i)

print(sorted(pos) + sorted(neg))
1

Sort the list in place twice like so:

lst = [1, -2, 10, -12, -4, -5, 9, 2]
lst.sort()
lst.sort(key=int(0).__gt__)      # key is True for items <= 0

This takes advantage of the fact the python sort function/method is stable. That means that items with the same value or key stay in the same order. The first sort puts all the items in order from smallest to largest. For the second sort, all the items < 0 get a key of True, all the items >= 0 get a key of False. Because True (1) > False (0), the second sort moves all the negative items to the end, without changing the order of the negative items.

0

*Here is another solution: *

lst = [1, -2, 10, -12, -4, -5, 9, 2]  # list of values.
x = sorted(lst) # x : [-12, -5, -4, -2, 1, 2, 9, 10]
k, m = [], []  # k : [1, 2, 9, 10] # M : [-12, -5, -4, -2]
for i in x:
    if i > 0:
        k.append(i)
    else:
        m.append(i)
w = k + m # w : [1, 2, 9, 10, -12, -5, -4, -2]
print(w)

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