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Sometimes when processing a Java stream() I find myself in need of a non-terminal forEach() to be used to trigger a side effect but without terminating processing.

I suspect I could do this with something like .map(item -> f(item)) where the method f performs the side effect and returns the item to the stream, but it seems a tad hokey.

Is there a standard way of handling this?

1
  • peek should not trigger any side effect. Do the forEach before or after your stream operation. If you think you need the forEach during your stream, the stream operation is most probably to complexe.
    – Herr Derb
    Dec 24, 2020 at 8:12

2 Answers 2

24

Yes there is. It is called peek() (example from the JavaDoc):

Stream.of("one", "two", "three", "four")
     .peek(e -> System.out.println("Original value: " + e))
     .filter(e -> e.length() > 3)
     .peek(e -> System.out.println("Filtered value: " + e))
     .map(String::toUpperCase)
     .peek(e -> System.out.println("Mapped value: " + e))
     .collect(Collectors.toList());
19
  • 8
    Although peek alone won't do anything without a terminal method.
    – Bohemian
    Nov 16, 2016 at 6:07
  • 4
    @Thomas: Thanks. Peek, what an obvious name. How on earth did I miss that...! :)
    – Ian
    Nov 16, 2016 at 6:22
  • 2
    @Ian yes, but your question specifically asked for a "non terminal forEach". I just wanted to emphasise that isn't anything like forEach. Actually, using peek to modify items is officially frowned upon. It is "OK" to use for non-mutating operations, but it was intended for cross cutting concerns like logging.
    – Bohemian
    Nov 16, 2016 at 6:29
  • 7
    this answer provides examples of how peek can break or not work as intended, when being used for non-debugging purposes.
    – Holger
    Nov 16, 2016 at 16:20
  • 5
    If you need more than one Consumer for your elements you could also chain your Consumers with c1.andThen(c2) (assuming that c1 and c2 are Consumers) Nov 16, 2016 at 16:38
12

No, there is not.

peek() will only operate on all elements when forced to by a following operation. Can you predict what will be printed by this code?

public class Test {
    private static final AtomicBoolean FLAG = new AtomicBoolean(false);

    private static void setFlagIfGreaterThanZero(int val) {
        if (val > 0) {
            FLAG.set(true);
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // Test 1
        FLAG.set(false);
        IntStream.range(0, 10)
                 .peek(Test::setFlagIfGreaterThanZero)
                 .findFirst();
        System.out.println(FLAG.get());

        // Test 2
        FLAG.set(false);
        IntStream.range(0, 10)
                 .peek(Test::setFlagIfGreaterThanZero)
                 .sorted()
                 .findFirst();
        System.out.println(FLAG.get());

        // Test 3
        FLAG.set(false);
        IntStream.range(0, 10)
                 .peek(Test::setFlagIfGreaterThanZero)
                 .filter(x -> x == 0)
                 .toArray();
        System.out.println(FLAG.get());

        // Test 4
        FLAG.set(false);
        IntStream.range(0, 10)
                 .boxed()
                 .peek(Test::setFlagIfGreaterThanZero)
                 .sorted()
                 .findFirst();
        System.out.println(FLAG.get());
    }
}

The answer is:

false
false
true
true

That output might be intuitive if you have a solid understanding of Java Streams, but hopefully it also indicates that it's a very bad idea to rely on peek() as a mid-stream forEach().

map() also suffers the same issue. As far as I'm aware, there is no Stream operation that guarantees a sort of "process every element without taking shortcuts" behavior in every case independent of the prior and following operations.

Although this can be a pain, the short-circuiting behavior of Streams is an important feature. You might find this excellent answer to another question on this topic to be useful.

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