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I have an 8 node cluster and I load two dataframes from a jdbc source like this:

positionsDf = spark.read.jdbc(
        url=connStr,
        table=positionsSQL,
        column="PositionDate",
        lowerBound=41275,
        upperBound=42736,
        numPartitions=128*3,
        properties=props
    )
positionsDF.cache()

varDatesDf = spark.read.jdbc(
        url=connStr,
        table=datesSQL,
        column="PositionDate",
        lowerBound=41275,
        upperBound=42736,
        numPartitions=128 * 3,
        properties=props
    )
varDatesDF.cache()

res = varDatesDf.join(positionsDf, on='PositionDate').count()

I can some from the storage tab of the application UI that the partitions are evenly distributed across the cluster nodes. However, what I can't tell is how they are distributed across the nodes. Ideally, both dataframes would be distributed in such a way that the joins are always local to the node, or even better local to the executors.

In other words, will the positionsDF dataframe partition that contains records with PositionDate="01 Jan 2016", be located in the same executor memory space as the varDatesDf dataframe partition that contains records with PositionDate="01 Jan 2016"? Will they be on the same node? Or is it just random?

Is there any way to see what partitions are on which node?

Does spark distribute the partitions created using a column key like this in a deterministic way across nodes? Will they always be node/executor local?

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will the positionsDF dataframe partition that contains records with PositionDate="01 Jan 2016", be located in the same executor memory space as the varDatesDf dataframe partition that contains records with PositionDate="01 Jan 2016"

It won't be in general. Even if data is co-partitioned (it is not here) it doesn't imply co-location.

Is there any way to see what partitions are on which node?

This relation doesn't have to be fixed over time. Task can be for example rescheduled. You can use different RDD tricks (TaskContext) or database log but it is not reliable.

would be distributed in such a way that the joins are always local to the node, or even better local to the executors.

Scheduler has its internal optimizations and low level APIs allow you to set node preferences but this type of things are not controllable in Spark SQL.

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