1

I am trying to conditionally enable a constructor template. With a fully C++11-compliant compiler, I know how to do this using an extra default template argument. However, I need to support VS2012, which has std::enable_if but does not support defaulted function template arguments.

With C++11, I would write the following:

template<typename T>
struct Class
{
  template<typename O, 
           typename = typename std::enable_if<std::is_convertible<O*, T*>::value>::type>
  Class(O*) {}
};

I tried the following, but it gives an error C4336 and various follow-up errors:

template<typename T>
struct Class
{
  template <typename O>
  Class(O*, typename std::enable_if<std::is_convertible<O*, T*>::value>::type *= nullptr)
  {
  }
};

Is there any way to make this work with VS2012?

Addition:

The usage of the class would be as follows:

struct X { };
struct X2 : X { };
struct Y { };

struct Client
{
  Client(Class<X> x) {}
  Client(Class<Y> y) {}
};

void test() {
  X2* x2;
  Client client(x2); // error C2668: ambiguous call to overloaded function
                     // (without std::enable_if)
}
  • Is there another constructor in your class or is this the only one? – skypjack Nov 16 '16 at 22:35
  • In the real class, there are also other constructors. – Simon Nov 17 '16 at 11:37
0

You are so close to the solution !

template<typename T>
struct Class
{
    template <typename O>
    Class(O*, typename std::enable_if<std::is_convertible<O*, T*>::value>::type * = nullptr)
    {
    }
};

Did you spot the difference ? *= inside the parameter list was parsed as the multiplication/assignment operator, not as a pointer type followed by a default argument. Hence, syntax errors.

This is because the C++ parser is specified to consume as many characters as possible when it forms a token (the so-called Maximum Munch Rule). Adding a space splits it into two separate tokens, as intended.

  • Argh... as you say, that was really close, and retrospectively a stupid mistake. – Simon Nov 17 '16 at 14:06
0

I am afraid, you'd have to use a helper construct function (I didn't find a way around it). But something like this should work:

#include <type_traits>

template<typename T>
struct Class
{
  template<typename O>
  Class(O* o) { construct(o, std::integral_constant<bool, std::is_convertible<T*, O*>::value>()); }

  template<class O>
  void construct(O*, std::true_type ) { /* convertible */ }
  template<class O>
  void construct(O*, ... ) { /* not convertible */ }
};

struct X { };
struct Y : public X { };

void check() {
  X x;
  int i;
  Class<Y> cl(&x);
  Class<Y> cl1(&i);
}
  • This is an Interesting idea... However, the original problem is that Class is a smart pointer template, and there are ambiguous conversions when calling two constructors of another class, which would probably not be resolved by this solution. Maybe I can provide a minimal version of that situation. – Simon Nov 17 '16 at 12:41
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Since C++11, you can also use delegating constructors to do that:

template<typename T>
class Class {
    template<typename O>
    Class(O *o, std::true_type) {}

    template<typename O>
    Class(O *o, std::false_type) {}

public:
    template<typename O>
    Class(O *o): Class(o, typename std::is_convertible<O*, T*>::type) {}
};

The basic idea is the one of tag dispatching and maybe it works fine also with VS2012.
See here for further details.

  • Thanks for the suggestion, unfortunately delegating constructors are also not supported in VS2012. – Simon Nov 17 '16 at 12:54

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