69

Is there a way to get properties names of class in TypeScript?

In the example, I would like to 'describe' the class A or any class and get an array of its properties (maybe only public ones?), is it possible? Or should I instantiate the object first?

class A {
    private a1;
    private a2;
    /** Getters and Setters */

}

class Describer<E> {
    toBeDescribed:E ;
    describe(): Array<string> {
        /**
         * Do something with 'toBeDescribed'                          
         */
        return ['a1', 'a2']; //<- Example
    }
}

let describer = new Describer<A>();
let x= describer.describe();
/** x should be ['a1', 'a2'] */ 
54

This TypeScript code

class A {
    private a1;
    public a2;
}

compiles to this JavaScript code

class A {
}

That's because properties in JavaScript start extisting only after they have some value. You have to assign the properties some value.

class A {
    private a1 = "";
    public a2 = "";
}

it compiles to

class A {
    constructor() {
        this.a1 = "";
        this.a2 = "";
    }
}

Still, you cannot get the properties from mere class (you can get only methods from prototype). You must create an instance. Then you get the properties by calling Object.getOwnPropertyNames().

let a = new A();
let array = return Object.getOwnPropertyNames(a);

array[0] === "a1";
array[1] === "a2";

Applied to your example

class Describer {
    static describe(instance): Array<string> {
        return Object.getOwnPropertyNames(instance);
    }
}

let a = new A();
let x = Describer.describe(a);
4
  • @erik_cupa there are som statements that are false. Mainly the code generated by typescript. For instance: typescriptlang.org/play/… there are a lot more. – titusfx Sep 15 '17 at 10:02
  • @titusfx typescript playground compiles the code to ES5. To get the same you have to compile to ES6+. You achieve it by specifying target in compiler options (either as argument or part of tsconfig.json). More on that here typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/compiler-options.html – Erik Cupal Sep 15 '17 at 18:19
  • @Erik_Cupal in case that you want to compile to ES6+ ( which is not the default compiler option, I believe it should be specified in the answer ). – titusfx Sep 17 '17 at 18:26
  • 4
    Annoying that we've to define a default value... especially in models this easily gets forgotten, which could lead into misbehaviour that is hard to find :/ – user6643481 Feb 8 '18 at 10:13
27

Some answers are partially wrong, and some facts in them are partially wrong as well.

Answer your question: Yes! You can.

In Typescript

class A {
    private a1;
    private a2;


}

Generates the following code in Javascript:

var A = /** @class */ (function () {
    function A() {
    }
    return A;
}());

as @Erik_Cupal said, you could just do:

let a = new A();
let array = return Object.getOwnPropertyNames(a);

But this is incomplete. What happens if your class has a custom constructor? You need to do a trick with Typescript because it will not compile. You need to assign as any:

let className:any = A;
let a = new className();// the members will have value undefined

A general solution will be:

class A {
    private a1;
    private a2;
    constructor(a1:number, a2:string){
        this.a1 = a1;
        this.a2 = a2;
    }
}

class Describer{

   describeClass( typeOfClass:any){
       let a = new typeOfClass();
       let array = Object.getOwnPropertyNames(a);
       return array;//you can apply any filter here
   }
}

For better understanding this will reference depending on the context.

1
  • 2
    Nice hack! Will not work for every constructor, of course. Imagine something like this: constructor(callback: {getValue: () => number}) { this.numberValue = callback.getValue(); } – Markus Ende Sep 30 '17 at 18:14
12

Another solution, You can just iterate over the object keys like so, Note: you must use an instantiated object with existing properties:

printTypeNames<T>(obj: T) {
    const objectKeys = Object.keys(obj) as Array<keyof T>;
    for (let key of objectKeys)
    {
       console.log('key:' + key);
    }
}
4
  • 17
    The object must exist and the properties be populated or this will fail to log the properties. – Zarepheth Jun 4 '18 at 18:24
  • @Zarepheth thanks for the clarification on the required checks, I've omitted them to avoid clutter in the answer like the previous, this example is just to simply show how to iterate over the keys – johnny 5 Jun 4 '18 at 18:30
  • 2
    Unless I'm mistaken, the questioner wanted to get a list of class properties, at run time, possibly without regard for having an instance of that class. I came across this, trying to do just that and not having any success if I do not first instantiate an instance. – Zarepheth Jun 4 '18 at 20:48
  • @Zarepheth, I see what you're saying now. Typescript currently doesn't support reflecting into its types, I've clarified the answer to state you must instantiate first – johnny 5 Jun 4 '18 at 20:53
10

Just for fun

class A {
    private a1 = void 0;
    private a2 = void 0;
}

class B extends A {
    private a3 = void 0;
    private a4 = void 0;
}

class C extends B {
    private a5 = void 0;
    private a6 = void 0;
}

class Describer {
    private static FRegEx = new RegExp(/(?:this\.)(.+?(?= ))/g); 
    static describe(val: Function, parent = false): string[] {
        var result = [];
        if (parent) {
            var proto = Object.getPrototypeOf(val.prototype);
            if (proto) {
                result = result.concat(this.describe(proto.constructor, parent));
            } 
        }
        result = result.concat(val.toString().match(this.FRegEx) || []);
        return result;
    }
}

console.log(Describer.describe(A)); // ["this.a1", "this.a2"]
console.log(Describer.describe(B)); // ["this.a3", "this.a4"]
console.log(Describer.describe(C, true)); // ["this.a1", ..., "this.a6"]

Update: If you are using custom constructors, this functionality will break.

2
  • is ' * = void 0;' mendatory ? or we can just use 'private a0:any' ? – timmz Nov 19 '16 at 9:05
  • 2
    You need initialize property, to generate constructor code. – madreason Nov 21 '16 at 13:08
3

Other answers mainly get all name of object, to get value of property, you can use yourObj[name], for example:

var propNames = Object.getOwnPropertyNames(yourObj);
propNames.forEach(
    function(propName) {
        console.log(
           'name: ' + propName 
        + ' value: ' + yourObj[propName]);
    }
);
2
  • 1
    I don't know why you were down-voted - Perfect answer for what I was looking for. Thanks! – John Bustos Jun 18 '20 at 20:53
  • This should be the top answer – Dorin Baba Mar 5 at 23:16
3

I am currently working on a Linq-like library for Typescript and wanted to implement something like GetProperties of C# in Typescript / Javascript. The more I work with Typescript and generics, the clearer picture I get of that you usually have to have an instantiated object with intialized properties to get any useful information out at runtime about properties of a class. But it would be nice to retrieve information anyways just from the constructor function object, or an array of objects and be flexible about this.

Here is what I ended up with for now.

First off, I define Array prototype method ('extension method' for you C# developers).

export { } //creating a module of below code
declare global {
  interface Array<T> {
    GetProperties<T>(TClass: Function, sortProps: boolean): string[];
} }

The GetProperties method then looks like this, inspired by madreason's answer.

if (!Array.prototype.GetProperties) {
  Array.prototype.GetProperties = function <T>(TClass: any = null, sortProps: boolean = false): string[] {
    if (TClass === null || TClass === undefined) {
      if (this === null || this === undefined || this.length === 0) {
        return []; //not possible to find out more information - return empty array
      }
    }
    // debugger
    if (TClass !== null && TClass !== undefined) {
      if (this !== null && this !== undefined) {
        if (this.length > 0) {
          let knownProps: string[] = Describer.describe(this[0]).Where(x => x !== null && x !== undefined);
          if (sortProps && knownProps !== null && knownProps !== undefined) {
            knownProps = knownProps.OrderBy(p => p);
          }
          return knownProps;
        }
        if (TClass !== null && TClass !== undefined) {
          let knownProps: string[] = Describer.describe(TClass).Where(x => x !== null && x !== undefined);
          if (sortProps && knownProps !== null && knownProps !== undefined) {
            knownProps = knownProps.OrderBy(p => p);
          }
          return knownProps;
        }
      }
    }
    return []; //give up..
  }
}

The describer method is about the same as madreason's answer. It can handle both class Function and if you get an object instead. It will then use Object.getOwnPropertyNames if no class Function is given (i.e. the class 'type' for C# developers).

class Describer {
  private static FRegEx = new RegExp(/(?:this\.)(.+?(?= ))/g);
  static describe(val: any, parent = false): string[] {
    let isFunction = Object.prototype.toString.call(val) == '[object Function]';
    if (isFunction) {
      let result = [];
      if (parent) {
        var proto = Object.getPrototypeOf(val.prototype);
        if (proto) {
          result = result.concat(this.describe(proto.constructor, parent));
        }
      }
      result = result.concat(val.toString().match(this.FRegEx));
      result = result.Where(r => r !== null && r !== undefined);
      return result;
    }
    else {
      if (typeof val == "object") {
        let knownProps: string[] = Object.getOwnPropertyNames(val);
        return knownProps;
      }
    }
    return val !== null ? [val.tostring()] : [];
  }
}

Here you see two specs for testing this out with Jasmine.

class Hero {
  name: string;
  gender: string;
  age: number;
  constructor(name: string = "", gender: string = "", age: number = 0) {
    this.name = name;
    this.gender = gender;
    this.age = age;
  }
}

class HeroWithAbility extends Hero {
  ability: string;
  constructor(ability: string = "") {
    super();
    this.ability = ability;
  }
}

describe('Array Extensions tests for TsExtensions Linq esque library', () => {

  it('can retrieve props for a class items of an array', () => {
    let heroes: Hero[] = [<Hero>{ name: "Han Solo", age: 44, gender: "M" }, <Hero>{ name: "Leia", age: 29, gender: "F" }, <Hero>{ name: "Luke", age: 24, gender: "M" }, <Hero>{ name: "Lando", age: 47, gender: "M" }];
    let foundProps = heroes.GetProperties(Hero, false);
    //debugger
    let expectedArrayOfProps = ["name", "age", "gender"];
    expect(foundProps).toEqual(expectedArrayOfProps);
    expect(heroes.GetProperties(Hero, true)).toEqual(["age", "gender", "name"]);
  });

  it('can retrieve props for a class only knowing its function', () => {
    let heroes: Hero[] = [];
    let foundProps = heroes.GetProperties(Hero, false);
    let expectedArrayOfProps = ["this.name", "this.gender", "this.age"];
    expect(foundProps).toEqual(expectedArrayOfProps);
    let foundPropsThroughClassFunction = heroes.GetProperties(Hero, true);
    //debugger
    expect(foundPropsThroughClassFunction.SequenceEqual(["this.age", "this.gender", "this.name"])).toBe(true);
  });

And as madreason mentioned, you have to initialize the props to get any information out from just the class Function itself, or else it is stripped away when Typescript code is turned into Javascript code.

Typescript 3.7 is very good with Generics, but coming from a C# and Reflection background, some fundamental parts of Typescript and generics still feels somewhat loose and unfinished business. Like my code here, but at least I got out the information I wanted - a list of property names for a given class or instance of objects.

SequenceEqual is this method btw:

    if (!Array.prototype.SequenceEqual) {
  Array.prototype.SequenceEqual = function <T>(compareArray: T): boolean {
    if (!Array.isArray(this) || !Array.isArray(compareArray) || this.length !== compareArray.length)
      return false;
    var arr1 = this.concat().sort();
    var arr2 = compareArray.concat().sort();
    for (var i = 0; i < arr1.length; i++) {
      if (arr1[i] !== arr2[i])
        return false;
    }
    return true;
  }
}
2

Use these

export class TableColumns<T> {
   constructor(private t: new () => T) {
        var fields: string[] = Object.keys(new t())

        console.log('fields', fields)
        console.log('t', t)

    }
}

Usage

columns_logs = new TableColumns<LogItem>(LogItem);

Output

fields (12) ["id", "code", "source", "title", "deleted", "checked", "body", "json", "dt_insert", "dt_checked", "screenshot", "uid"]

js class

t class LogItem {
constructor() {
    this.id = 0;
    this.code = 0;
    this.source = '';
    this.title = '';
    this.deleted = false;
    this.checked = false;
  …
1

There is another answer here that also fits the authors request: 'compile-time' way to get all property names defined interface

If you use the plugin ts-transformer-keys and an Interface to your class you can get all the keys for the class.

But if you're using Angular or React then in some scenarios there is additional configuration necessary (webpack and typescript) to get it working: https://github.com/kimamula/ts-transformer-keys/issues/4

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