1140

I want to return JSON from a PHP script.

Do I just echo the result? Do I have to set the Content-Type header?

1
  • 3
    Always set the Content-Type header for json, to avoid XSS. Observe the difference between these two scripts: <?php print json_encode(["someKey" => "<body onload=alert(1)>"]); ?> and <?php header("Content-Type: application/json");print json_encode(["someKey" => "<body onload=alert(1)>"]); ?> For more information see: security.stackexchange.com/questions/169427/… [Not able to submit an answer due to reputation requirement]
    – emeth
    Oct 14, 2022 at 13:57

20 Answers 20

2047
Answer recommended by PHP Collective

While you're usually fine without it, you can and should set the Content-Type header:

<?php
$data = /** whatever you're serializing **/;
header('Content-Type: application/json; charset=utf-8');
echo json_encode($data);

If I'm not using a particular framework, I usually allow some request params to modify the output behavior. It can be useful, generally for quick troubleshooting, to not send a header, or sometimes print_r the data payload to eyeball it (though in most cases, it shouldn't be necessary).

15
  • 13
    just in case: you should use header() commands only in addition with output buffering to avoid "headers already sent" warnings
    – Kevin
    Jul 2, 2014 at 16:51
  • 1
    It's good practice to always put your header() statements as far to the top of the page as possible so that when you add more code, you aren't tempted to insert code before the header() statement which could break things if you start outputting.
    – Mikepote
    Oct 13, 2014 at 13:17
  • 25
    @mikepote I actually don't think it's necessary to have the header command at the top of the PHP file. If you're inadvertently spitting out stuff and that's tripping up your header command, you just need to fix your code because it's broken.
    – Halfstop
    Sep 10, 2015 at 18:02
  • 12
    @KrzysztofKalinowski no, the PHP file doesn't need to be UTF-8 encoded. the output MUST be UTF-8 encoded. Those wrong statements doesn't help non-experienced users to learn how to avoid things from breaking, but it helps to grow myths on them and never learning which role does encodings play on streams and how they work. Oct 26, 2016 at 11:58
  • 5
    @timdev don't forget to call exit(); of die(); right after echo json_encode($data);, otherwise random data from your script (e.g profiling) might get appended to your json response.
    – Binar Web
    Jun 16, 2018 at 8:59
155

A complete piece of nice and clear PHP code returning JSON is:

$option = $_GET['option'];

if ( $option == 1 ) {
    $data = [ 'a', 'b', 'c' ];
    // will encode to JSON array: ["a","b","c"]
    // accessed as example in JavaScript like: result[1] (returns "b")
} else {
    $data = [ 'name' => 'God', 'age' => -1 ];
    // will encode to JSON object: {"name":"God","age":-1}  
    // accessed as example in JavaScript like: result.name or result['name'] (returns "God")
}

header('Content-type: application/json');
echo json_encode( $data );
2
  • 1
    You should probably be doing: $option = isset($_GET['option']); beforehand.
    – gotnull
    Oct 11, 2021 at 5:34
  • $option = isset($_GET['option']) ? trim($_GET['option']) : null;
    – WiiLF
    Nov 12, 2022 at 4:20
66

According to the manual on json_encode the method can return a non-string (false):

Returns a JSON encoded string on success or FALSE on failure.

When this happens echo json_encode($data) will output the empty string, which is invalid JSON.

json_encode will for instance fail (and return false) if its argument contains a non UTF-8 string.

This error condition should be captured in PHP, for example like this:

<?php
header("Content-Type: application/json");

// Collect what you need in the $data variable.

$json = json_encode($data);
if ($json === false) {
    // Avoid echo of empty string (which is invalid JSON), and
    // JSONify the error message instead:
    $json = json_encode(["jsonError" => json_last_error_msg()]);
    if ($json === false) {
        // This should not happen, but we go all the way now:
        $json = '{"jsonError":"unknown"}';
    }
    // Set HTTP response status code to: 500 - Internal Server Error
    http_response_code(500);
}
echo $json;
?>

Then the receiving end should of course be aware that the presence of the jsonError property indicates an error condition, which it should treat accordingly.

In production mode it might be better to send only a generic error status to the client and log the more specific error messages for later investigation.

Read more about dealing with JSON errors in PHP's Documentation.

2
  • 3
    There's no charset parameter for JSON; see the note at the end of tools.ietf.org/html/rfc8259#section-11: "No 'charset' parameter is defined for this registration. Adding one really has no effect on compliant recipients." (JSON must be transmitted as UTF-8 per tools.ietf.org/html/rfc8259#section-8.1, so specifying that it's encoded as UTF-8 is a bit redundant.) Feb 10, 2018 at 6:26
  • 1
    Thanks for highlighting that, @PatrickDark. Redundant charset parameter removed from HTTP header string.
    – trincot
    Feb 10, 2018 at 7:53
41

Try json_encode to encode the data and set the content-type with header('Content-type: application/json');.

0
37

This question got many answers but none cover the entire process to return clean JSON with everything required to prevent the JSON response to be malformed.


/*
 * returnJsonHttpResponse
 * @param $success: Boolean
 * @param $data: Object or Array
 */
function returnJsonHttpResponse($httpCode, $data)
{
    // remove any string that could create an invalid JSON 
    // such as PHP Notice, Warning, logs...
    ob_start();
    ob_clean();

    // this will clean up any previously added headers, to start clean
    header_remove(); 

    // Set the content type to JSON and charset 
    // (charset can be set to something else)
    // add any other header you may need, gzip, auth...
    header("Content-type: application/json; charset=utf-8");

    // Set your HTTP response code, refer to HTTP documentation
    http_response_code($httpCode);
    
    
    // encode your PHP Object or Array into a JSON string.
    // stdClass or array
    echo json_encode($data);

    // making sure nothing is added
    exit();
}

References:

response_remove

ob_clean

Content-type JSON

HTTP Codes

http_response_code

json_encode

3
  • 2
    thnx for the ob_clean reference. I had a leading line that was jacking up my fetch response.json() calls.
    – Chris Love
    Aug 20, 2020 at 18:47
  • 1
    What's the point of ob_clean if ob_start wasn't called?
    – Gino Pane
    Aug 12, 2023 at 16:09
  • what's the use of exit() when there are other shutdown handlers? and as @GinoPane commented, and then stacked output buffers? And imagine you remove headers and then it ruins the output compression. The road to hell is paved with good intentions. And if this fails, it's not deliberately an internal server error... .
    – hakre
    Aug 13, 2023 at 21:09
29

Set the content type with header('Content-type: application/json'); and then echo your data.

0
22

It is also good to set the access security - just replace * with the domain you want to be able to reach it.

<?php
header('Access-Control-Allow-Origin: *');
header('Content-type: application/json');
    $response = array();
    $response[0] = array(
        'id' => '1',
        'value1'=> 'value1',
        'value2'=> 'value2'
    );

echo json_encode($response); 
?>

Here is more samples on that: how to bypass Access-Control-Allow-Origin?

2
  • What does it mean if this doesn't work? For example, to restrict only to calls from CodePen, I tried header('Access-Control-Allow-Origin: https://cdpn.io');, but I can still load the page from my own browser.
    – ashleedawg
    Jul 2, 2020 at 13:56
  • it is used for blocking cross scripting (one script calling another page). So you will be able to load it directly from your browser, but you cant load it from another domain using script. Jul 8, 2020 at 18:46
12

A simple function to return a JSON response with the HTTP status code.

function json_response($data=null, $httpStatus=200)
{
    header_remove();

    header("Content-Type: application/json");

    http_response_code($httpStatus);

    echo json_encode($data);

    exit();
}
3
  • 1
    header_remove, and explicitly setting the http response is a good idea; although setting status and then http_response seems redundant. Might also want to add an exit statement to the end. I combined your function with @trincot 's: stackoverflow.com/a/35391449/339440
    – Stephen R
    Nov 18, 2019 at 17:25
  • Using JS FetchAPI, could you extend your answer on how to receive sent data? fetch(...).then(res => res.json()).then(data => /* do smth */).catch(e => console.error(e)) works great when response is 200, but how to get $data on 500 to show the exact error thrown in PHP in the .catch() method in JS?
    – s3c
    Sep 8, 2021 at 8:53
  • To achieve that you have to wrap your code in a try catch: try { /* code... */ json_response('Success!', 200); } catch (\Exception $e) { json_response($e->getMessage(), 500); }
    – Dan
    Sep 8, 2021 at 14:25
10
<?php
$data = /** whatever you're serializing **/;
header("Content-type: application/json; charset=utf-8");
echo json_encode($data);
?>
1
  • 1
    What is the difference stating the charset in header? Please explain, thanks.
    – Sanxofon
    Nov 22, 2019 at 17:50
7

As said above:

header('Content-Type: application/json');

will make the job. but keep in mind that :

  • Ajax will have no problem to read json even if this header is not used, except if your json contains some HTML tags. In this case you need to set the header as application/json.

  • Make sure your file is not encoded in UTF8-BOM. This format add a character in the top of the file, so your header() call will fail.

6

If you want js object use header content-type:

<?php
$data = /** whatever you're serializing **/;
header('Content-Type: application/json; charset=utf-8');
echo json_encode($data);

If you want only json : remove header content-type attribute, just encode and echo.

<?php
$data = /** whatever you're serializing **/;
echo json_encode($data);
3

The answer to your question is here,

It says.

The MIME media type for JSON text is application/json.

so if you set the header to that type, and output your JSON string, it should work.

3

If you need to get json from php sending custom information you can add this header('Content-Type: application/json'); before to print any other thing, So then you can print you custome echo '{"monto": "'.$monto[0]->valor.'","moneda":"'.$moneda[0]->nombre.'","simbolo":"'.$moneda[0]->simbolo.'"}';

2

Yeah, you'll need to use echo to display output. Mimetype: application/json

0
1

If you query a database and need the result set in JSON format it can be done like this:

<?php

$db = mysqli_connect("localhost","root","","mylogs");
//MSG
$query = "SELECT * FROM logs LIMIT 20";
$result = mysqli_query($db, $query);
//Add all records to an array
$rows = array();
while($row = $result->fetch_array()){
    $rows[] = $row;
}
//Return result to jTable
$qryResult = array();
$qryResult['logs'] = $rows;
echo json_encode($qryResult);

mysqli_close($db);

?>

For help in parsing the result using jQuery take a look at this tutorial.

1

This is a simple PHP script to return male female and user id as json value will be any random value as you call the script json.php .

Hope this help thanks

<?php
header("Content-type: application/json");
$myObj=new \stdClass();
$myObj->user_id = rand(0, 10);
$myObj->male = rand(0, 5);
$myObj->female = rand(0, 5);
$myJSON = json_encode($myObj);
echo $myJSON;
?>
1
  • The MIME media type for JSON text is application/json
    – Amr Aly
    Apr 22, 2019 at 17:43
1

Whenever you are trying to return JSON response for API or else make sure you have proper headers and also make sure you return a valid JSON data.

Here is the sample script which helps you to return JSON response from PHP array or from JSON file.

PHP Script (Code):

<?php

// Set required headers
header('Content-Type: application/json; charset=utf-8');
header('Access-Control-Allow-Origin: *');

/**
 * Example: First
 *
 * Get JSON data from JSON file and retun as JSON response
 */

// Get JSON data from JSON file
$json = file_get_contents('response.json');

// Output, response
echo $json;

/** =. =.=. =.=. =.=. =.=. =.=. =.=. =.=. =.=. =.=. =.  */

/**
 * Example: Second
 *
 * Build JSON data from PHP array and retun as JSON response
 */

// Or build JSON data from array (PHP)
$json_var = [
  'hashtag' => 'HealthMatters',
  'id' => '072b3d65-9168-49fd-a1c1-a4700fc017e0',
  'sentiment' => [
    'negative' => 44,
    'positive' => 56,
  ],
  'total' => '3400',
  'users' => [
    [
      'profile_image_url' => 'http://a2.twimg.com/profile_images/1285770264/PGP_normal.jpg',
      'screen_name' => 'rayalrumbel',
      'text' => 'Tweet (A), #HealthMatters because life is cool :) We love this life and want to spend more.',
      'timestamp' => '{{$timestamp}}',
    ],
    [
      'profile_image_url' => 'http://a2.twimg.com/profile_images/1285770264/PGP_normal.jpg',
      'screen_name' => 'mikedingdong',
      'text' => 'Tweet (B), #HealthMatters because life is cool :) We love this life and want to spend more.',
      'timestamp' => '{{$timestamp}}',
    ],
    [
      'profile_image_url' => 'http://a2.twimg.com/profile_images/1285770264/PGP_normal.jpg',
      'screen_name' => 'ScottMili',
      'text' => 'Tweet (C), #HealthMatters because life is cool :) We love this life and want to spend more.',
      'timestamp' => '{{$timestamp}}',
    ],
    [
      'profile_image_url' => 'http://a2.twimg.com/profile_images/1285770264/PGP_normal.jpg',
      'screen_name' => 'yogibawa',
      'text' => 'Tweet (D), #HealthMatters because life is cool :) We love this life and want to spend more.',
      'timestamp' => '{{$timestamp}}',
    ],
  ],
];

// Output, response
echo json_encode($json_var);

JSON File (JSON DATA):

{
    "hashtag": "HealthMatters", 
    "id": "072b3d65-9168-49fd-a1c1-a4700fc017e0", 
    "sentiment": {
        "negative": 44, 
        "positive": 56
    }, 
    "total": "3400", 
    "users": [
        {
            "profile_image_url": "http://a2.twimg.com/profile_images/1285770264/PGP_normal.jpg", 
            "screen_name": "rayalrumbel", 
            "text": "Tweet (A), #HealthMatters because life is cool :) We love this life and want to spend more.", 
            "timestamp": "{{$timestamp}}"
        }, 
        {
            "profile_image_url": "http://a2.twimg.com/profile_images/1285770264/PGP_normal.jpg", 
            "screen_name": "mikedingdong", 
            "text": "Tweet (B), #HealthMatters because life is cool :) We love this life and want to spend more.", 
            "timestamp": "{{$timestamp}}"
        }, 
        {
            "profile_image_url": "http://a2.twimg.com/profile_images/1285770264/PGP_normal.jpg", 
            "screen_name": "ScottMili", 
            "text": "Tweet (C), #HealthMatters because life is cool :) We love this life and want to spend more.", 
            "timestamp": "{{$timestamp}}"
        }, 
        {
            "profile_image_url": "http://a2.twimg.com/profile_images/1285770264/PGP_normal.jpg", 
            "screen_name": "yogibawa", 
            "text": "Tweet (D), #HealthMatters because life is cool :) We love this life and want to spend more.", 
            "timestamp": "{{$timestamp}}"
        }
    ]
}

JSON Screeshot:

enter image description here

0

An easy way to format your domain objects to JSON is to use the Marshal Serializer. Then pass the data to json_encode and send the correct Content-Type header for your needs. If you are using a framework like Symfony, you don't need to take care of setting the headers manually. There you can use the JsonResponse.

For example the correct Content-Type for dealing with Javascript would be application/javascript.

Or if you need to support some pretty old browsers the safest would be text/javascript.

For all other purposes like a mobile app use application/json as the Content-Type.

Here is a small example:

<?php
...
$userCollection = [$user1, $user2, $user3];

$data = Marshal::serializeCollectionCallable(function (User $user) {
    return [
        'username' => $user->getUsername(),
        'email'    => $user->getEmail(),
        'birthday' => $user->getBirthday()->format('Y-m-d'),
        'followers => count($user->getFollowers()),
    ];
}, $userCollection);

header('Content-Type: application/json');
echo json_encode($data);
0

In case you're doing this in WordPress, then there is a simple solution:

add_action( 'parse_request', function ($wp) {
    $data = /* Your data to serialise. */
    wp_send_json_success($data); /* Returns the data with a success flag. */
    exit(); /* Prevents more response from the server. */
})

Note that this is not in the wp_head hook, which will always return most of the head even if you exit immediately. The parse_request comes a lot earlier in the sequence.

-1

You can use this little PHP library. It sends the headers and give you an object to use it easily.

It looks like :

<?php
// Include the json class
include('includes/json.php');

// Then create the PHP-Json Object to suits your needs

// Set a variable ; var name = {}
$Json = new json('var', 'name'); 
// Fire a callback ; callback({});
$Json = new json('callback', 'name'); 
// Just send a raw JSON ; {}
$Json = new json();

// Build data
$object = new stdClass();
$object->test = 'OK';
$arraytest = array('1','2','3');
$jsonOnly = '{"Hello" : "darling"}';

// Add some content
$Json->add('width', '565px');
$Json->add('You are logged IN');
$Json->add('An_Object', $object);
$Json->add("An_Array",$arraytest);
$Json->add("A_Json",$jsonOnly);

// Finally, send the JSON.

$Json->send();
?>
0

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