Today I skimmed over the Azure subscription and service limits, quotas, and constraints. Then I noticed there is a limit for deployments in a resource group of Azure Resource Manager. The default limit as well as the maximum limit is 800 deployments per resource group.

Does this mean I can run 800 deployments within the lifetime of a resource group and after I reached this limit this resource group can not run any deployments? Or is this limit related to concurrent runs of deployments and addresses platform scalability aspects?

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The "Deployments per resource group" in https://docs.microsoft.com/en-gb/azure/azure-subscription-service-limits#resource-group-limits specifies the limit of the deployments history. The deployments history can be accessed in the resource group under Settings > Deployments. Deletion of the resources does not remove the deployments from the history, and the other way round - deleting the deployments history does not affect the state of the resources in the resource group. Once the limit of 800 deployments is reached, further deployments will not be possible. Even if you have no resources in the resource group, the deployments history would need to be cleared in order to proceed with the further deployments.

Deployments history can be deleted manually or via powershell. Check https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/cloud_solution_architect/2016/08/22/handling-azure-resource-manager-deployment-limits/

A given resource group, at any moment in time, will have zero or more deployments. This has nothing to do with a lifetime counter, nor does it relate to scaling. It's simply how many deployments you currently have within that resource group.

If you viewed your resource group (via portal/powershell/cli/api), you'd see a list of deployments, up to 800 of them.

The blog post referenced above uses an older version of the Azure cmdlet Remove-AzureRmResourceGroupDeployment that allows a -Force parameter. The current version (as of 11/2017) doesn't include that parameter (-Force) and as a result forces a confirmation dialog which will prevent automation from working.

  • So you are correct in that they have updated the cmdlet to remove the -Force parameter, but it does work for me without confirmation dialog when I run in the PowerShell ISE – ToDevAndBeyond Mar 27 at 14:24

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.