18

I have a templated class Helper which looks like this:

template< typename Mapper >
class Helper
{
public:

   using mappedType = ... ;

};

I would need mappedType to be the type returned by the map(const int&) method in the Mapper class. Given a valid type for Mapper like the following:

class DMapper
{
public:

    double map(const int& val){ ... }
};

Helper<DMapper>::mappedType should be double. Is there a way to do that without instantiating a Mapper?

The closest I got is:

using mappedType = typename std::result_of<
    decltype(&Mapper::map)(Mapper const*, const int&)
>::type;

But type is not defined in this case.

EDIT:

If I can avoid using a dummy argument for the int, that would be even better (in my concrete code, the argument is not that simple).

2
  • Do you actually need the name in Dmapper? Since you have C++14 you can just use auto like auto function(stuff) { return whatever; } – NathanOliver Nov 17 '16 at 13:05
  • Yep, I know that there are other way to achieve my goal (I need to return a std::vector of mappedType in a method from the Helper), that was more out of curiosity :) – Dr_Sam Nov 17 '16 at 13:07
15

The closest I got is

using mappedType = typename std::result_of<decltype(&Mapper::map)(Mapper const*, const int&)>::type;

You almost got it.

Auto-declared this pointer is not constant in non-constant class methods, so your

decltype(&Mapper::map)(Mapper const*, const int&)

does not match any method in Mapper class. Remove const qualifier from the first argument, and your result_of solution will work without instancing and dummy arguments:

using mappedType = typename std::result_of<
    decltype(&Mapper::map)(Mapper /*no const here*/ *, const int&)
>::type;
5
  • I did not think that I was that close to a solution... Thank you for pointing this out! – Dr_Sam Nov 17 '16 at 13:30
  • I accept this one since it was very close to what I got, event if the answer from wasthishelpful works equally well. – Dr_Sam Nov 17 '16 at 14:40
  • Is the "auto-declared" this pointer described in the standard or platform-specific? I must say this is the first time I've seen it explicitly written like that (even though 'everybody knows' it's just another argument). – The Vee Nov 17 '16 at 17:35
  • 1
    @TheVee Yes, it is standard. It's presence in all member functions is described by sections 9.3.1-9.3.2 of the Standard. And it's declaration as the first argument of any non-static method is required, for example, in section 2.9.12 [func.require]. See also this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/26692378/… – Sergey Nov 17 '16 at 18:07
  • This breaks if map is overloaded, unlike the declval solution. – T.C. Nov 17 '16 at 19:49
33

You can use std::declval to use member functions in decltype without creating an instance:

using mappedType = decltype(std::declval<Mapper>().map(0));

std::declval can be used for arguments as well:

using mappedType = decltype(std::declval<Mapper>().map(std::declval<int>()));
5
  • Mhhh nice! Can you do the same without having to specify some kind of dummy argument for the method (here 0 for the int), because it's not that simple in reality – Dr_Sam Nov 17 '16 at 13:04
  • Very slick use of declval. :) – erip Nov 17 '16 at 13:04
  • 1
    @Dr_Sam why are you concerned about the dummy argument, is it because its a reference to a more complicated type? Remember that you can always also use declval for the dummy argument itself. – Smeeheey Nov 17 '16 at 13:20
  • @Smeeheey Indeed, using mappedType = decltype(std::declval<Mapper>().map(std::declval<const int&>())); works fine – Dr_Sam Nov 17 '16 at 13:29
  • @Dr_Sam: The main advantage of the dummy argument (or a use of declval again) is that unlike your attempted solution conversion rules and overload resolution apply. So for example if I was to create a mapper with a double map(long) it would still work, likewise if map had a second (defaulted) argument, or was template, or... – Matthieu M. Nov 17 '16 at 20:06
5

Assuming that Mapper::map is not an overloaded method, its return type can be resolved automatically as follows:

template< typename Mapper >
class Helper
{
private:
    template<class R, class... T>
    static R resolveReturnType(R (Mapper::*)(T...));

    template<class R, class... T>
    static R resolveReturnType(R (Mapper::*)(T...) const);

public:
    using mappedType = decltype(resolveReturnType(&Mapper::map));
};

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