3

I want to be able to completely transparently wrap any Ruby proc (including ones that I have not written the source code for myself), and log its execution time.

my_proc

That is, I want to create a proc that calls my_proc preserving

  1. the context/receiver
  2. the arguments
  3. the block.

and print out the execution time when it was called.


For example:

my_proc = proc { |*args, &block| p self: self, args: args, block: block }

Object.new.instance_eval &my_proc
#=> {
#  :self=>#<Object:0x007fd4c985f3e0>,
#  :args=>[#<Object:0x007fd4c985f3e0>],
#  :block=>nil
# }

Object.instance_exec '5', &my_proc
#=> {
#  :self=>Object,
#  :args=>["5"],
#  :block=>nil
# }

my_proc.call(1, 2) { }
#=> {
#  :self=>main,
#  :args=>[1, 2],
#  :block=>#<Proc:0x007fd4c985e9b8>
# }

And then I want to wrap it, and it should behave exactly the same:

def wrap(prc)
  # what does this look like?
end

wrapped_proc = wrap(my_proc)

Object.new.instance_eval(&wrapped_proc)
# took 1s
#=> {
#  :self=>#<Object:0x007fd4c985f3e0>,
#  :args=>[#<Object:0x007fd4c985f3e0>],
#  :block=>nil
# }

Object.instance_exec '5', &wrapped_proc
# took 2s
#=> {
#  :self=>Object,
#  :args=>["5"],
#  :block=>nil
# }

wrapped_proc.call(1, 2) { }
# took 3s
#=> {
#  :self=>main,
#  :args=>[1, 2],
#  :block=>#<Proc:0x007fd4c985e9b8>
# }

It doesn't seem like a transparent function wrapper should be hard, but I can't figure this out.

  • 1
    You code doesn't work for me. Do you mean p self, args, block and instance_eval(&wrapped_proc)? And you probably want my_proc instead of wrapped_proc in your first example. – Stefan Nov 18 '16 at 6:00
  • 1
    @mudasobwa: inspect my answer edit history. This was the first thing I posted. However, it does not qualify as wrapping. – Sergio Tulentsev Nov 18 '16 at 10:29
  • 1
    @mudasobwa: no, that's cloning :) You surely are familiar with concept of decorators. That is wrapping. Get a new object (new identity) but some functionality is delegated to the wrapped object. – Sergio Tulentsev Nov 18 '16 at 10:35
  • 1
    Of course it does. Yet, it’s still a Delegate pattern, meaning it still has zero value in this particular case. – Aleksei Matiushkin Nov 18 '16 at 10:39
  • 1
    I cannot even reproduce the OP's unwrapped examples. – Jörg W Mittag Nov 18 '16 at 10:42
3

The only trick here is to handle both λ.call and pass-through-block cases because in the latter scenario the Proc#call is not invoked. Sic.

My first [wrong] intent was to simply:

def wrap λ
  λ.singleton_class.prepend(Module.new do
    def call(*args, &cb)
      puts "⇓⇓⇓"
      super
      puts "⇑⇑⇑"
    end
  end)
end

but as I have already said, the specific_eval does not call Proc#call nor Proc#to_proc and I gave up.


On the other hand, we might simply instance_exec wrapped λ in the context of the receiver, but there is no way to pass a block as a parameter to instance_exec, since it already receives λ itself.

The plot thickens. Since we can’t pass a block as a parameter to instance_exec, neither can the consumer of our wrapper. Yes, that solves the task:

def wrap λ
  -> (*args, &cb) do
    puts "⇓⇓⇓"
    (cb ? λ.call(*args, &cb) : instance_exec(*args, &λ)).tap do |result|
      puts result.inspect
      puts "⇑⇑⇑"
    end
  end
end

Here you go.

| improve this answer | |
  • "neither can the consumer of our wrapper" - Ah! How did I not think of that! – Sergio Tulentsev Nov 18 '16 at 18:38
  • @SergioTulentsev frankly, I am still digging into the ruby code (code of ruby itself :), trying to understand what was the reason to bypass Proc#call within calls. And I can not find any. The first snippet I posted makes way more sense to me. – Aleksei Matiushkin Nov 18 '16 at 18:42
  • Nice solution, and the first try would have made sense. Is UTF-8 code being used in big official Ruby projects? – Eric Duminil Nov 18 '16 at 19:24
  • "neither can the consumer of our wrapper" Not quite true. We can pass self, arg, and block, if we modify the self object. a = Object.new; a.define_singleton_method :foo, λ; a.λ(arg) {} – Paul Draper Nov 18 '16 at 19:29
  • 1
    @EricDuminil Mike Perham’s Sidekiq is a big official project. Yes, it’s still more of a joke there, but in my experience (linux/ext{2,4}) I never met any problems with UTF8 since 2000 and I constantly introduce these symbols into our company’s codebase. E.g. using and as “alert method name,” for internal log and for OK status makes my code both freaky and lovely. Also, rails uses as a value for UTF-8 in params of every single request, check your logs :) – Aleksei Matiushkin Nov 18 '16 at 20:09

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