11

IIS-Manager

To restrict the access to an web app, an Administrator is able to set the url authorization of users and groups via the IIS-Manager:

IIS Autohrization Rules

Web.config

The IIS-Manager stores the Authorization Rules in the web.config of the app:

<security>
  <authorization bypassLoginPages="true"> 
    <remove users="*" roles="" verbs="" />
    <add accessType="Allow" users="Testuser" />
    <add accessType="Deny" users="*" /> 
  </authorization>
</security>

When bypassLoginPages is set to true, all users are authorized to access the login page. When an user is not logged in, he will automatically be redirected to the login page:

<authentication mode="Forms">
  <forms [...] loginUrl="~/Auth/Login" [...] >
    [...]
  </forms>
</authentication>

MVC5 App:

The user has to login in via an custom login page by his Windows SamAccountName and password. The credentials will be sent to the Login action of the AuthController:

[AllowAnonymous]
public class AuthController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult Login
    {
        // validation of SamAccountName and Password against Active Directory here.

        [...]

        // We want to check the authorization here.

        // create authentication ticket
        FormsAuthenticationTicket lFormsAuthenticationTicket = new FormsAuthenticationTicket(1,
            SamAccountName,
            DateTime.Now,
            DateTime.Now.AddMinutes(AuthCookieTimeout),
            RememberMe,
            CustomData,
            FormsAuthentication.FormsCookiePath);

        // Encrypt the ticket.
        string lEncryptedTicket = FormsAuthentication.Encrypt(lFormsAuthenticationTicket);

        var lAuthCookie = new HttpCookie(FormsAuthentication.FormsCookieName, lEncryptedTicket);

        // Create the cookie.
        Response.Cookies.Add(lAuthCookie);

        [...]

        return RedirectToAction("Index", "Main"); // redirect to the main controller
    }
}

All restricted controllers are making the authorization check via the [Authorize] attribute automatically:

[Authorize]
public class MainController : Controller
{
    [...]
}

An decoration like [Authorize(Users="User1,User2")] is no solution because the code is not accessible by the Endusers which should have the possibility to configurate the access to the app.

When a user is not authorized, then he will be redirected to the login page. That works fine. But I need to make the authorization check in the Login action before. So my question:

How can I manually validate in my AuthController if the logged in user is authorized to redirect to the MainController?

6
+50

Q: How can I manually validate in my AuthController if the logged in user is authorized to redirect to the MainController?

Since you are using Authorize attribute, you don't need to check authorization manually in the action. These are some rules:

  • Limit access to Authenticated users: [Authorize]
  • Limit access to some specific users: [Authorize(Users="User1,User2")]
  • Limit access to some specific roles: [Authorize(Roles="Administrators,PowerUsers")]

Since you decorated the MainController with Authorize attribute, it means no one can access its actions without login. So in Logon action you don't need to check if the user is authorized to redirect to main controller. There isn't any security flaw here and you don't need to worry about authorization when you use RedirectToAction("Index", "Main").

Q: A definition in the the Authorize attribute would not solve the problem. How can Administrators restrict users and groups when they buy the software? Thy have no access to the code.

Roles are created for such requirement. You should use [Authorize(Roles="Role1")] above MainController and then each user of Role1 can access the actions of main controller. It can simply be done in user and role management of your application. So:

  1. At development time, decorate controllers and actions with static roles
  2. At run-time, you can manage user role using your application.

Note

In most applications roles are static and you can say which role can have access to which action. In such cases the current Authorize attribute would be enough for authorization. Just add users to roles at run-time. Identity Samples contains required models, views and controllers to do so.

In a case which you want to create new roles at run-time or change permissions of a role at run-time, you need to create a new Authorize attribute which reads role of user from a config file or database and also read permissions of a role from a config file or database and decide about authorization.

  • "Since you decorated the MainController with Authorize attribute, it means no one can access its actions without login." → That´s wrong. When a user is logged in (FormsAuthenticationTicket is set) and is not Authorized (url authorization of users and groups via the IIS-Manager) then in the debug mode, the breakpoint in the first line of the controller declared by [Authorized] will not be touched. But when user is logged in and is Authorized, then he can access the Controller. – Simon Nov 22 '16 at 13:51
  • You didn't get it. 1) If you use [Authorize] no one can access it without login. OK? → it means every one who are logged on, can access it. 2) If you use [Authorize(Users="User1,User2")] it means between logged ion users, just User1 and User2 can access the action. – Reza Aghaei Nov 22 '16 at 14:30
  • You not understood my comment. You said: "If you use [Authorize] no one can access it without login. OK? → it means every one who are logged on, can access it.". That is wrong. Not everyone can access it. When a user will be denied via a definition in the web.config, he cannot access. This is the current fact. A definition in the the Authorize attribute would not solve the problem. How can Administrators restrict users and groups when they buy the software? Thy have no access to the code. – Simon Nov 22 '16 at 14:38
  • It seems you don't know what's the usage of roles. Forget about config and just use attributes. Just decorate your actions/controllers with [Authorize(Roles="SomeRole")] at design time and then at run-time add users to roles. Forget about config and just use attributes. This is exactly what you need. – Reza Aghaei Nov 22 '16 at 16:13
  • +50 for your persistence – Simon Nov 29 '16 at 6:50
3

You should not use <authorization> tag in ASP.Net MVC. It is meant for ASP.Net Web Form. You can read more in SO.

In ASP.Net MVC, you want to use [Authorize] attribute. In addition, you want to use OWIN middleware instead of old FormsAuthenticationTicket.

It has few pieces, so I created a sample project in GitHub AspNetMvcActiveDirectoryOwin. The original souce is to authenticate with AD, but you just need to tweak ActiveDirectoryService class.

The following three are the main classes -

  1. AccountController

  2. ActiveDirectoryService

  3. OwinAuthenticationService replaces FormsAuthentication.

  • I do not want to use <authorization> tag??? I think you didn´t understand my question. – Simon Nov 22 '16 at 13:46
  • I updated my question. Using <authorization> in ASP.Net MVC will lead you to big security hole. – Win Nov 22 '16 at 13:51
  • The app already uses the [Authorize] attribute. Please read my question. – Simon Nov 22 '16 at 13:55
  • You should not mix with <authorization> with [Authorize]. The bottom line is do not use <authorization> tag in ASP.Net MVC. How about a thank for someone give their times for you instead of down-voting them? – Win Nov 22 '16 at 13:57
  • Where to you think, should the Administrator of the Web App (has no access to any code) define his groups and users which have access to the web app? – Simon Nov 22 '16 at 14:02
3

Two options,

Either use the "Roles" option under Authorize like so:

 [Authorize(Roles="TestUsers,Admins")]

And then add the users that should be allowed access to this action to those roles. Roles are provided as part of the ClaimsPrincipal used by ASP Identity.

Or alternatively, provide your own implementation of the Authorize attribute that tests the currently logged in user for whatever business rules you have and then either allow or disallow access.

  • 1
    Does it have anything more than What I said in my answer? If you think it's the solution, you don't need to post your own answer, you can vote the existing answer! – Reza Aghaei Nov 22 '16 at 16:47

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