60

In my react and typescript app, I use: onChange={(e) => data.motto = (e.target as any).value}.

How do I correctly define the typings for the class, so I wouldn't have to hack my way around the type system with any?

export interface InputProps extends React.HTMLProps<Input> {
...

}

export class Input extends React.Component<InputProps, {}> {
}

If I put target: { value: string }; I get :

ERROR in [default] /react-onsenui.d.ts:87:18
Interface 'InputProps' incorrectly extends interface 'HTMLProps<Input>'.
  Types of property 'target' are incompatible.
    Type '{ value: string; }' is not assignable to type 'string'.
97

Generally event handlers should use e.currentTarget.value, e.g.:

onChange = (e: React.FormEvent<HTMLInputElement>) => {
    const newValue = e.currentTarget.value;
}

You can read why it so here https://github.com/DefinitelyTyped/DefinitelyTyped/pull/12239

UPD: As mentioned by @roger-gusmao ChangeEvent more suitable for typing form events.

onChange = (e: React.ChangeEvent<HTMLInputElement>)=> {
   const newValue = e.target.value;
}
52

the correct way to use in TypeScript is

  handleChange(e: React.ChangeEvent<HTMLInputElement>) {
    // No longer need to cast to any - hooray for react!
    this.setState({temperature: e.target.value});
  }

  render() {
        ...
        <input value={temperature} onChange={this.handleChange} />
        ...
    );
  }

Follow the complete class, it's better to understand:

import * as React from "react";

const scaleNames = {
  c: 'Celsius',
  f: 'Fahrenheit'
};


interface TemperatureState {
   temperature: string;
}

interface TemperatureProps {
   scale: string;

}

class TemperatureInput extends React.Component<TemperatureProps, TemperatureState> {
  constructor(props: TemperatureProps) {
    super(props);
    this.handleChange = this.handleChange.bind(this);
    this.state = {temperature: ''};
  }

  //  handleChange(e: { target: { value: string; }; }) {
  //    this.setState({temperature: e.target.value});  
  //  }


  handleChange(e: React.ChangeEvent<HTMLInputElement>) {
    // No longer need to cast to any - hooray for react!
    this.setState({temperature: e.target.value});
  }

  render() {
    const temperature = this.state.temperature;
    const scale = this.props.scale;
    return (
      <fieldset>
        <legend>Enter temperature in {scaleNames[scale]}:</legend>
        <input value={temperature} onChange={this.handleChange} />
      </fieldset>
    );
  }
}

export default TemperatureInput;
  • 2
    note: to ensure types are available, add lib: ["dom"] to compilerOptions in tsconfig.json – James Conkling Aug 10 '18 at 19:11
  • 1
    This should be a correct answer – sztrzask Aug 20 '18 at 14:04
  • 1
    @JamesConkling Thank you so much! – Alexandre Rivest Mar 29 at 19:32
  • And if you have multiple inputs do you need to make a row for each? – Trevor Wood Apr 12 at 4:33
7

as HTMLInputElement works for me

6

The target you tried to add in InputProps is not the same target you wanted which is in React.FormEvent

So, the solution I could come up with was, extending the event related types to add your target type, as:

interface MyEventTarget extends EventTarget {
    value: string
}

interface MyFormEvent<T> extends React.FormEvent<T> {
    target: MyEventTarget
}

interface InputProps extends React.HTMLProps<Input> {
    onChange?: React.EventHandler<MyFormEvent<Input>>;
}

Once you have those classes, you can use your input component as

<Input onChange={e => alert(e.target.value)} />

without compile errors. In fact, you can also use the first two interfaces above for your other components.

  • The value type is not string! – Roger Gusmao Mar 23 '18 at 22:16
2

lucky i find a solution. you can

import { ChangeEvent } from 'react';

and then write code like: e:ChangeEvent<HTMLInputElement>

0

Here is a way with ES6 object destructuring, tested with TS 3.3.
This example is for a text input.

name: string = '';

private updateName({ target }: { target: HTMLInputElement }) {
    this.name = target.value;
}

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