506

In my react and typescript app, I use:

onChange={(e) => data.motto = (e.target as any).value}

How do I correctly define the typings for the class, so I wouldn't have to hack my way around the type system with any?

export interface InputProps extends React.HTMLProps<Input> {
...

}

export class Input extends React.Component<InputProps, {}> {
}

If I put target: { value: string }; I get :

ERROR in [default] /react-onsenui.d.ts:87:18
Interface 'InputProps' incorrectly extends interface 'HTMLProps<Input>'.
  Types of property 'target' are incompatible.
    Type '{ value: string; }' is not assignable to type 'string'.

24 Answers 24

952

Generally event handlers should use e.currentTarget.value, e.g.:

const onChange = (e: React.FormEvent<HTMLInputElement>) => {
  const newValue = e.currentTarget.value;
}

You can read why it so here (Revert "Make SyntheticEvent.target generic, not SyntheticEvent.currentTarget.").

UPD: As mentioned by @roger-gusmao ChangeEvent more suitable for typing form events.

const onChange = (e: React.ChangeEvent<HTMLInputElement>) => {
  const newValue = e.target.value;
}
9
  • 92
    This simply does not work. value is not a property of the interface EventTarget
    – Franc
    Mar 28, 2017 at 17:09
  • 2
    Of course not EventTarget, but part of HTMLInputElement You can see full definition here github.com/DefinitelyTyped/DefinitelyTyped/blob/master/types/…
    – Yozi
    Mar 29, 2017 at 5:31
  • 6
    Oh sorry, you used currentTarget. In that case yes, it works, but the question was about target
    – Franc
    Mar 29, 2017 at 8:10
  • 4
    Yes, you right, but as mentioned in github.com/DefinitelyTyped/DefinitelyTyped/pull/12239 using target incorrect in most cases. Moreover, target does not have T to force us to write correctly
    – Yozi
    Mar 29, 2017 at 16:29
  • 30
    This didn't work for me, I had to cast the event to React.ChangeEvent<HTMLInputElement> rather than a FormEvent. Feb 14, 2019 at 16:55
253

the correct way to use in TypeScript is

  handleChange(e: React.ChangeEvent<HTMLInputElement>) {
    // No longer need to cast to any - hooray for react!
    this.setState({temperature: e.target.value});
  }

  render() {
        ...
        <input value={temperature} onChange={this.handleChange} />
        ...
    );
  }

Follow the complete class, it's better to understand:

import * as React from "react";

const scaleNames = {
  c: 'Celsius',
  f: 'Fahrenheit'
};


interface TemperatureState {
   temperature: string;
}

interface TemperatureProps {
   scale: string;

}

class TemperatureInput extends React.Component<TemperatureProps, TemperatureState> {
  constructor(props: TemperatureProps) {
    super(props);
    this.handleChange = this.handleChange.bind(this);
    this.state = {temperature: ''};
  }

  //  handleChange(e: { target: { value: string; }; }) {
  //    this.setState({temperature: e.target.value});  
  //  }


  handleChange(e: React.ChangeEvent<HTMLInputElement>) {
    // No longer need to cast to any - hooray for react!
    this.setState({temperature: e.target.value});
  }

  render() {
    const temperature = this.state.temperature;
    const scale = this.props.scale;
    return (
      <fieldset>
        <legend>Enter temperature in {scaleNames[scale]}:</legend>
        <input value={temperature} onChange={this.handleChange} />
      </fieldset>
    );
  }
}

export default TemperatureInput;
6
  • 5
    note: to ensure types are available, add lib: ["dom"] to compilerOptions in tsconfig.json Aug 10, 2018 at 19:11
  • 3
    And if you have multiple inputs do you need to make a row for each?
    – Trevor
    Apr 12, 2019 at 4:33
  • Another way to make sure 'this' is assigned appropriately in the handleChange function would be to write handleChange as an arrow function i.e. handleChange = (e: React.ChangeEvent<HTMLInputElement>) => { this.setState(...); }; By doing that, one would no longer have to use the constructor to bind the handleEvent function.
    – tlavarea
    Sep 16, 2019 at 19:05
  • One more way to handle 'this' instead of using the constructor and bind method would be to use the arrow function in the onChange prop i.e. onChange={e => this.handleChange(e)}
    – tlavarea
    Sep 16, 2019 at 19:30
  • With these changes I am getting error: No overload matches this call. Overload 1 of 2, '(props: Readonly<Props>): Input', gave the following error. Type '(e: ChangeEvent<HTMLInputElement>) => void' is not assignable to type '(event: CustomEvent<ChangeDetail>) => void'. Can someone please help me?
    – Sagar
    Mar 8, 2020 at 23:42
90

You can do the following:

import { ChangeEvent } from 'react';

const onChange = (e: ChangeEvent<HTMLInputElement>)=> {
   const newValue = e.target.value;
}
0
27

ChangeEvent<HTMLInputElement> is the type for change event in typescript. This is how it is done-

import { ChangeEvent } from 'react';

const handleInputChange = (event: ChangeEvent<HTMLInputElement>) => {
    setValue(event.target.value);
};
0
24

we can also use the onChange event fire-up with defined types(in functional component) like as follows:

 const handleChange = (
    e: React.ChangeEvent<HTMLTextAreaElement | HTMLInputElement>
  ) => {
        const name = e.target.name;
        const value = e.target.value;
};

18

as HTMLInputElement works for me

2
  • 3
    That doesn't have a .target?
    – J86
    Jul 28, 2021 at 10:10
  • @J86 It's the target you're casting as HTMLInputElement. Since the EventTarget is an HTML element
    – Jeff Klein
    Jul 26, 2023 at 19:22
14

I use something like this:

import { ChangeEvent, useState } from 'react';


export const InputChange = () => {
  const [state, setState] = useState({ value: '' });

  const handleChange = (event: ChangeEvent<{ value: string }>) => {
    setState({ value: event?.currentTarget?.value });
  }
  return (
    <div>
      <input onChange={handleChange} />
      <p>{state?.value}</p>
    </div>
  );
}
1
  • 4
    Finally something worked. I still don't understand how a ChangeEvent<HTMLInputElement> does not have a value on currentTarger or target...
    – AO19
    Jan 17, 2021 at 20:15
12

The target you tried to add in InputProps is not the same target you wanted which is in React.FormEvent

So, the solution I could come up with was, extending the event related types to add your target type, as:

interface MyEventTarget extends EventTarget {
    value: string
}

interface MyFormEvent<T> extends React.FormEvent<T> {
    target: MyEventTarget
}

interface InputProps extends React.HTMLProps<Input> {
    onChange?: React.EventHandler<MyFormEvent<Input>>;
}

Once you have those classes, you can use your input component as

<Input onChange={e => alert(e.target.value)} />

without compile errors. In fact, you can also use the first two interfaces above for your other components.

1
  • The value type is not string! Mar 23, 2018 at 22:16
11

When using Child Component We check type like this.

Parent Component:

export default () => {

  const onChangeHandler = ((e: React.ChangeEvent<HTMLInputElement>): void => {
    console.log(e.currentTarget.value)
  }

  return (
    <div>
      <Input onChange={onChangeHandler} />
    </div>
  );
}

Child Component:

type Props = {
  onChange: (e: React.ChangeEvent<HTMLInputElement>) => void
}

export Input:React.FC<Props> ({onChange}) => (
  <input type="tex" onChange={onChange} />
)
1
  • 1
    tiny edit remove extraneous parentheses - const onChangeHandler = (e: React.ChangeEvent<HTMLInputElement>): void => {
    – Oversteer
    Oct 20, 2020 at 10:44
10

An alternative that has not been mentioned yet is to type the onChange function instead of the props that it receives. Using React.ChangeEventHandler:

const stateChange: React.ChangeEventHandler<HTMLInputElement> = (event) => {
    console.log(event.target.value);
};
8
const handleChange = (
    e: ChangeEvent<HTMLInputElement>
  ) => {
    const { name, value } = e.target;
    this.setState({ ...currentState, [name]: value });
  };

you can apply this on every input element in the form component

6

Here is a way with ES6 object destructuring, tested with TS 3.3.
This example is for a text input.

name: string = '';

private updateName({ target }: { target: HTMLInputElement }) {
    this.name = target.value;
}
1
  • This is a great answer that works across the board. I was heavy on Angular, was forced onto React for a year, and am now playing with Angular again to stay fresh on it. React provides some really nice event interfaces that Typescript natively lacks. This approach helps get the same desired typing, even in vanilla. Thanks. Oct 11, 2021 at 17:14
5

This is when you're working with a FileList Object:

onChange={(event: React.ChangeEvent<HTMLInputElement>): void => {
  const fileListObj: FileList | null = event.target.files;
  if (Object.keys(fileListObj as Object).length > 3) {
    alert('Only three images pleaseeeee :)');
  } else {
    // Do something
  }

  return;
}}
5

This works for me also it is framework agnostic.

const handler = (evt: Event) => {
  console.log((evt.target as HTMLInputElement).value))
}
4

You no need to type if you do this:

<input onChange={(event) => { setValue(e.target.value) }} />

Because if you set a new value with the arrow function directly in the html tag, typescript will understand by default the type of event.

4
const onChange = (event: React.ChangeEvent<HTMLInputElement>) => {
    const newValue = (event.target || event.currentTarget) as HTMLInputElement;
    return newValue.value;
}
1
  • 1
    When we can expect not having event.target? I'm interested what case it handles? event.target || event.currentTarget
    – Yozi
    Dec 24, 2023 at 14:08
3

Thanks @haind

Yes HTMLInputElement worked for input field

//Example
var elem = e.currentTarget as HTMLInputElement;
elem.setAttribute('my-attribute','my value');
elem.value='5';

This HTMLInputElement is interface is inherit from HTMLElement which is inherited from EventTarget at root level. Therefore we can assert using as operator to use specific interfaces according to the context like in this case we are using HTMLInputElement for input field other interfaces can be HTMLButtonElement, HTMLImageElement etc.

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/HTMLInputElement

For more reference you can check other available interface here

1
  function handle_change(
    evt: React.ChangeEvent<HTMLInputElement>
  ): string {
    evt.persist(); // This is needed so you can actually get the currentTarget
    const inputValue = evt.currentTarget.value;

    return inputValue
  }

And make sure you have "lib": ["dom"] in your tsconfig.

1

Convert string to number simple answer

<input
    type="text"
    value={incrementAmount}
    onChange={(e) => {
      setIncrementAmmount(+e.target.value);
    }}
/>
1

This worked great for me.

  const [form, setForm] = useState<string>();

  const updateFormState = (event: { target: { value: React.SetStateAction<string | undefined>; }; }) => {
    setForm(event.target.value)
    console.log(form)
  }

And then the form in the return

<form onSubmit={handleClick}>
        <label>Input</label>
        <input value={form} onChange={updateFormState} type='text'></input>
        <button type='submit'>Submit</button>
 </form>
1

In case anyone having trouble with event.target.file, you can refer to the following code which solved my problem for my react project.

    const target = event.target as HTMLInputElement;
    const selectedFile: File = (target.files as FileList)[0];
    console.log("Selected File:", selectedFile, event);
  };
0
import { NativeSyntheticEvent, TextInputChangeEventData,} from 'react-native';



  // Todo in java script
 const onChangeTextPassword = (text : any) => {
    setPassword(text);
  }
    

// Todo in type script use this

  const onChangeTextEmail = ({ nativeEvent: { text },}: NativeSyntheticEvent<TextInputChangeEventData>) => {
    console.log("________ onChangeTextEmail _________ "+ text);
    setEmailId(text);
  };


 <TextInput
          style={{ width: '100%', borderBottomWidth: 1, borderBottomColor: 'grey', height: 40, }}
          autoCapitalize="none"
          returnKeyType="next"
          maxLength={50}
          secureTextEntry={false}
          onChange={onChangeTextEmail}
          value={emailId}
          defaultValue={emailId}
          
        />

  
0
const event = { target: { value: 'testing' } as HTMLInputElement };
handleChangeFunc(event as ChangeEvent<HTMLInputElement>);

this work for me.

0

The most useless feature/requirement in typescript. It's Event, everybody knows it an event. They got to introduce so much problem for such non-issue.

U got to declare type for an event.target? crazy

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