20

I have two libraries that I work with and I wrote a converter between some of the types/structs they use, for convenience.

template<typename T>
struct unsupportedType : std::false_type
{};

template<typename T>
FormatB getFormat()
{
    static_assert(
        unsupportedType<T>::value, "This is not supported!");
}

template<>
FormatB getFormat<FormatA::type1>()
{
    return FormatB(//some parameters);
}

template<>
FormatB getFormat<FormatA::type2>()
{
    return FormatB(//some other parameters);
}

Now due to the unsupportedType struct, the compiler does not immediately see that the assertion will always fail and thus does not throw a compilation error if the non-specialized version is not called somewhere. However, the compiler therefore also does not know that a return statement after the static_assert is unnecessary. I do not just want to place an arbitrary return statement after the assert to get rid of the warning.

Question: What is a clean way to get rid of the warning?

  • 1
    Have you tried the C++ attribute [[noreturn]] on the function declaration? – KABoissonneault Nov 18 '16 at 16:07
  • 1
    What's wrong with just putting return after static assert? – HolyBlackCat Nov 18 '16 at 16:39
  • 1
    What is the expected behaviour when the static_assert fails? The reason the compiler warns is that there are ways to break the static_assert (specializing the unsupportedType struct). – NOhs Nov 18 '16 at 16:44
20

I would try to avoid the static_assert, by using something like

template<typename T> FormatB getFormat()=delete;

The compiler writers can then work on improving those error messages.

  • 1
    This actually does not answer the question directly, but it gives the best answer to my actual problem, I guess, how to not allow the non specialized version to be called. I don't know if I should now reformulate the question, or how to proceed to make this question + answer the most useful to everyone. – NOhs Nov 18 '16 at 16:50
  • 1
    Somehow I missed the elephant in the room. – Quentin Nov 18 '16 at 18:20
  • While this is legal code, at least one compiler (clang) will reject it. – Sam Nov 18 '16 at 22:19
6

There's more than one way to exit a function, returning is one, but throwing is another:

template<typename T>
FormatB getFormat()
{
    static_assert(
        unsupportedType<T>::value, "This is not supported!");
    throw 0; // Unreachable
}
  • Is it considered good practice to just throw 0? I could imagine that if for some reason somebody is "clever" enough to specialize unsupportedType giving it a true value, it might be hard to track if it just throws an arbitrary 0. – NOhs Nov 18 '16 at 16:22
  • @MrZ that throw is unreachable, it'll never actually happen. It's there to make the compiler think that the function always finished execution in well-defined manner (because for the compiler the static_assert is not guaranteed to fire). – krzaq Nov 18 '16 at 16:23
  • 2
    @MrZ then I suggest throw std::runtime_error{"Why the hell are you trying to break my TMP?"}; ;) – Quentin Nov 18 '16 at 16:24
  • 4
    @MrZ in the words of...someone, "Guard against Murphy, not Machiavelli" – jaggedSpire Nov 18 '16 at 16:24
  • 3
    @MrZ I know you've decided on the other answer, but future visitors here might want a logic_error instead: succeeding in calling a function that should issue a compile error indicates an error in the program logic, after all – jaggedSpire Nov 18 '16 at 16:51
6

For you said in a comment to the accepted answer that it actually does not answer the question directly, here is a working solution that can be of help for future readers.


To solve the issue you can just define your function template as it follows:

template<typename T, typename R = void>
R getFormat()
{
    static_assert(
        unsupportedType<T>::value, "This is not supported!");
}

No changes are required for the other specializations, the type R can be deduced directly from the return type.


It follows a minimal, working example that shows how it works:

#include<type_traits>

template<typename T>
struct unsupportedType : std::false_type
{};

struct FormatA{
    using type1 = int;
    using type2 = char;
};

struct FormatB{};

template<typename T, typename R = void>
R getFormat()
{
    static_assert(
        unsupportedType<T>::value, "This is not supported!");
}

template<>
FormatB getFormat<FormatA::type1>()
{
    return FormatB();
}

template<>
FormatB getFormat<FormatA::type2>()
{
    return FormatB();
}

int main() {}
4

You can use GCC's __builtin_unreachable (it's way down on that link) to communicate to the compiler that a given line is unreachable, which will suppress that warning. (I mostly mention this for C devs who end up here; for C++, the method using delete above is better).

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