I know there's a shortcut like using loadash's uniq but I try to remove duplicated array of object using a native for loop.

var json = [
{name:"james"},
{name:"james_x"},
{name:"jame"},
{name:"james_x"}
]

for(var i = 0;i<json.length-1;i++){
   if(json[i].name == json[i+1].name){
      json.splice(i,i);
   }
}

console.log(json);

https://jsfiddle.net/8wwnvzoc/

I REALLY want to know what's wrong.

  • i think you need two for loop – Mahi Nov 18 '16 at 16:26
  • store each name in a seperate names array. On each loop check if the name already exists in this name array, if it does remove it. – JParkinson1991 Nov 18 '16 at 16:28
  • I REALLY want to know what's wrong. Are you getting an error ? a wrong result ? – Dart Feld Nov 18 '16 at 16:29
  • You are comparing the current item with only the next item in the list. That won't work unless the list was sorted – Matt Burland Nov 18 '16 at 16:29
  • check sorting algorithms using for loop and i would suggest you to delete this question as you are going to earn many negative votes out of this :) – Sachin Nov 18 '16 at 16:34
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can do it like so:

var json = [{
   name: "james"
  }, {
  name: "james_x"
  }, {
  name: "jame"
  }, {
  name: "james_x"
  }]

const unique = []

json.forEach(function(item) {
    var existingName = unique.find(function(name) { return name.name === item.name})
    !existingName ? unique.push(item) : null
})

console.log(unique)
  • this simple???? – Thian Kian Phin Nov 18 '16 at 17:09
  • 1
    Yes that simple ;) It's quite simple in itself though as you just want to loop over every item in an array, check if the item exists in comparison array if not, just push it in :) I hope this helps you! I should add the find method is a prototype of Array which is an ES2015 feature – Jackthomson Nov 18 '16 at 20:49
  • you're passing name in find(), is that correct? please check. I thought u should pass item? – Thian Kian Phin Nov 20 '16 at 15:18
  • @ThianKianPhin if I passed item in there it would no longer be a comparison.item is referencing your JSON data. name is referencing the items within the unique array. If I were to change name to item I would be checking if item is equal to item. Item and name can be compared with one another which is what we are doing in the return statement. I hope this makes sense? – Jackthomson Nov 20 '16 at 17:27

You shouldn't modify an array while you're iterating over it. It will lead to unexpected behavior. I'd recommend building an array of indices to remove and then remove them once you're fully through the array.

To fix your algorithm, you need to keep track of all the names you've seen. You can use an ES6 set for this.

var json = [
{name:"james"},
{name:"james_x"},
{name:"jame"},
{name:"james_x"}
]
var indicesToRemove = [];
var seen = new Set();    

for(var i = 0;i<json.length;i++){
   if (seen.has(json[i].name)) {
     indicesToRemove.push(i) 
   } else {
     seen.add(json[i].name);
   } 
}

for(index of indicesToRemove.reverse()) {
    // iterating backwards to prevent indices changing on us...
    json.splice(index,index);
}
console.log(json);
  • 1
    That's true, but it still doesn't change the fact that their algorithm is all wrong in the first place. – Matt Burland Nov 18 '16 at 16:30
  • @MattBurland Yup good point – Alejandro C. Nov 18 '16 at 16:32
  • Updated answer to address multiple concerns. – Alejandro C. Nov 18 '16 at 16:39
  • If you want to modify an array as you iterate over it, iterate -backwards- so indices don't getting messed up. – Autumn Leonard Nov 18 '16 at 16:49

Try sorting the array before looping over it like this:

var json = [
{name:"james"},
{name:"james_x"},
{name:"jame"},
{name:"james_x"}
]

json = json.sort(function(a, b){a=a.name;b=b.name;return a<b?-1:a>b?1:0});

for(var i = 0;i<json.length-1;i++){
   if(json[i].name == json[i+1].name){
      json.splice(i,1);
   }
}

console.log(json);

Then, the equal values will be near each other so your algorithm will work as expected...

EDIT:

A possibly better approach, though not using a loop:

var json = [
{name:"james"},
{name:"james_x"},
{name:"jame"},
{name:"james_x"}
]

json = json
    .sort(function(a, b){a=a.name;b=b.name;return a<b?-1:a>b?1:0})
    .reduce(function(a, b){var n=a.length;if(n===0||a[n-1].name!==b.name)a[n]=b;return a},[]);

console.log(json);
  • I like the way you saw this. It could be the way the OP intended it to work from the beginning. Let's hope triplicates don't exist though :P – Dart Feld Nov 18 '16 at 16:54
  • "native for loop", only asks for duplicates. I think this could be a clean simple solution. Good job. – Dart Feld Nov 18 '16 at 16:57
  • @DartFeld triplicates will kill this solution? – Thian Kian Phin Nov 18 '16 at 16:57
  • @ThianKianPhin Yes since you check only the neihgboor, delete it, then you increment and go to the next value. – Dart Feld Nov 18 '16 at 16:58
  • This still is a viable solution for the specificly asked question. – Dart Feld Nov 18 '16 at 17:00

You're not checking all other items when testing for duplication. Further you're modifying the array while iterating over it - this might crash.

var json = [
  { name:"james" },
  { name:"james" },
  { name:"james_x" },
  { name:"james_x" },
  { name:"james_x" },
  { name:"jame" },
  { name:"james_x" },
  { name:"jame" },
];

var i = 0,
    index = { /* track what we've seen already */ },
    current;

while (i < json.length) {
  current = json[i].name;

  // check if the name is in index
  if (current in index) {
    // it is, remove it from the array
    json.splice(i, 1);
  } else {
    // not in index, leave it untouched and add it to the index
    // by defining a key in "index" with arbitrary value
    index[current] = true;
    // only step forward when indexing, not when removing
    i++;
  }
}

The increment is limited to the indexing branch since the algorithm would accidentally skip the next item if it's also a duplicate (the following items would shift left-/upwards).

See the progress (2nd column is the following iteration step of the 1st column):

When incrementing in both branches:

1            1
2            2
3            3
2 <= dupe    2 
2            2 <= accidentally incremented
2            4    missed the previous item
4

Correct incrementation:

1            1
2            2
3            3
2 <= dupe    2 <= not incremented, all OK
2            2
2            4
4

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