1

My next step is if the input is not in the Fibonacci Series, the program has to give an output with a number which is in the series that is nearest to the input. I do not know how to proceed, can anyone help me?

def fibs():
    a,b = 0,1
    yield a
    yield b
    while True:
        a,b = b,a+b
        yield b

n = int(input("please, enter a number: "))
for fib in fibs():
    if n == fib:
        print("Yes! Your number is a Fibonacci number!")
        break
    if fib > n:
        print("No! Your number is not a Fibonacci number!")
        break
  • 4
    You could have a variable that keeps the old number, and compare it to input to see if the old variable is closer to the input or the new generated one is closer.... – MooingRawr Nov 18 '16 at 17:37
  • If (5*n^2 + 4) or (5*n^2 – 4) is a perfect square, then n is a Fibonacci number. You can use this to be able to do very large Fibonacci numbers very quickly. – Douglas Nov 18 '16 at 18:26
  • I've added a faster algorithm to my answer, as well as some timing code that compares the speed of the various main algorithms. – PM 2Ring Nov 19 '16 at 8:16
  • Also see stackoverflow.com/questions/5162780/… – PM 2Ring Nov 19 '16 at 9:19
  • is it possible to find the position of my input or the nearest fibonacci number in the series? i figure out the way to find the value of the fibonacci number by typing in the n th but not the other way around – Tammy Nov 19 '16 at 14:46
1

Why this method works well:

This is a way that does not require previous computation, so is fantastic for performance and such when checking very large numbers.


The Program:

from math import *

n = int(input("Enter a number:"))

if sqrt(5*n**2+4)%1==0 or sqrt(5*n**2-4)%1==0:
    print("Your number is a Fibonacci number!")
else:
    print("Your number is not a Fibonacci number.")
    c = 0
    while 1:
        c += 1
        if sqrt(5*(n+c)**2+4)%1==0 or sqrt(5*(n+c)**2-4)%1==0:
            print("%s is the closest Fibonacci number to your entry." % str(n+c))
            break
        if sqrt(5*(n-c)**2+4)%1==0 or sqrt(5*(n-c)**2-4)%1==0:
            print("%s is the closest Fibonacci number to your entry." % str(n-c))
            break

The Explanation:

If (5*n^2 + 4) or (5*n^2 – 4) is a perfect square, then n is a Fibonacci number.


Program Input/Output

Enter a number: 9999999999
Your number is not a Fibonacci number.
9999816735 is the closest Fibonacci number to your entry.


Enter a number: 9999816735
Your number is a Fibonacci number!

  • If you could rig up a way to do this with multithreading, it would be extremely fast! – Douglas Nov 18 '16 at 18:27
  • This algorithm is brilliant when n is actually a Fibonacci number, but it can get really slow when it has to search, especially for large n. I've added a faster algorithm to my answer, as well as some timing code that compares the speed of our algorithms and Rockybilly's. – PM 2Ring Nov 19 '16 at 8:20
  • is it possible to find the position of my input or the nearest fibonacci number in the series? i figure out the way to find the value of the fibonacci number by typing in the n th but not the other way around – Tammy Nov 19 '16 at 14:15
  • Here is a VERY useful formula to find the nth Fibonacci number: F(n) = round( (Phi**n) / √5 ) provided n ≥ 0. To solve for n, you just use algebra to swap the equation around: n = 1.67227594 + 2.07808692 ln(F(n)). You can get very in-depth with Fibonacci numbers, and I suggest doing some research on them, especially if you plan on going so far into it. There are many cool things about Fibonacci numbers that people don't know. Did you know that everything in nature shows Fibonacci (or Lucas) numbers, like the swirls on a pinecone? – Douglas Nov 19 '16 at 22:48
  • You may have noticed that I used that formula in my updated nearest_fib function: y = int((log(n) + logroot5) / logphi)... – PM 2Ring Nov 20 '16 at 17:38
5

Here's a simple way using your generator that's ok for testing small numbers.

def fibs():
    a,b = 0,1
    yield a
    yield b
    while True:
        a,b = b,a+b
        yield b

def nearest_fib(n):
    ''' If n is a Fibonacci number return True and n
        Otherwise, return False and the nearest Fibonacci number
    '''
    for fib in fibs():
        if fib == n:
            return True, n
        elif fib < n:
            prev = fib
        else:
            # Is n closest to prev or to fib?
            if n - prev < fib - n:
                return False, prev
            else:
                return False, fib

# Test
for i in range(35):
    print(i, nearest_fib(i))

output

0 (True, 0)
1 (True, 1)
2 (True, 2)
3 (True, 3)
4 (False, 5)
5 (True, 5)
6 (False, 5)
7 (False, 8)
8 (True, 8)
9 (False, 8)
10 (False, 8)
11 (False, 13)
12 (False, 13)
13 (True, 13)
14 (False, 13)
15 (False, 13)
16 (False, 13)
17 (False, 21)
18 (False, 21)
19 (False, 21)
20 (False, 21)
21 (True, 21)
22 (False, 21)
23 (False, 21)
24 (False, 21)
25 (False, 21)
26 (False, 21)
27 (False, 21)
28 (False, 34)
29 (False, 34)
30 (False, 34)
31 (False, 34)
32 (False, 34)
33 (False, 34)
34 (True, 34)

Update

Here's a more efficient method which uses Binet's formula to first approximate y: F(y) = n. It then uses a pair of identities related to the matrix form (which can compute F(n) in O(log(n)) time) to recursively find the nearest Fibonacci numbers to n. The recursion is quite fast because it uses a cache to hold values that have already been computed. Without the cache this algorithm is roughly the same speed as Rockybilly's.

from math import log, sqrt

def fast_fib(n, cache={0: 0, 1: 1}):
    if n in cache:
        return cache[n]
    m = (n + 1) // 2
    a, b = fast_fib(m - 1), fast_fib(m)
    fib = a * a + b * b if n & 1 else (2 * a + b) * b
    cache[n] = fib
    return fib

logroot5 = log(5) / 2
logphi = log((1 + 5 ** 0.5) / 2)

def nearest_fib(n):
    if n == 0:
        return 0
    # Approximate by inverting the large term of Binet's formula
    y = int((log(n) + logroot5) / logphi)
    lo = fast_fib(y)
    hi = fast_fib(y + 1)
    return lo if n - lo < hi - n else hi

for i in range(35):
    print(i, nearest_fib(i))

output

0 0
1 1
2 2
3 3
4 5
5 5
6 5
7 8
8 8
9 8
10 8
11 13
12 13
13 13
14 13
15 13
16 13
17 21
18 21
19 21
20 21
21 21
22 21
23 21
24 21
25 21
26 21
27 21
28 34
29 34
30 34
31 34
32 34
33 34
34 34

Note that fast_fib uses a default mutable argument for the cache, but that's ok here because we want the cache to remember its previous contents.

In my speed tests a default mutable argument cache is faster than any other form of cache but it has the downside that it's impossible to clear the cache from outside of the function, and if you add logic to the function for cache clearing it impacts the performance for the majority of the calls when you don't want to clear the cache.

Update

It is actually possible to clear a default mutable argument cache from outside the function. We can access a function's default arguments via its .__default__ attribute (or .func_defaults in old versions of Python 2; .__default__ works in Python 2.6, but not in 2.5).

Eg,

d = fast_fib.__defaults__[0]
d.clear()
d.update({0: 0, 1: 1})

Here is some code (which runs on Python 2 and Python 3) that performs timing tests on some of the algorithms submitted for this question. Rockybilly's is very similar to my first version except it avoids having to save the previous value. I've also made the OP's fibs generator a little more compact.

Douglas's code is ok for small numbers, or when the argument is, in fact, a Fibonacci number, but it gets very slow for large non-Fibonacci numbers due to the slow one-by-one search. I've been able to optimize it a little by avoiding recalculation of various quantities, but that doesn't make a huge difference to the running speed.

In this version, my fast_fib() function uses a global cache so that it can be cleared between tests to make the timings fairer.

#!/usr/bin/env python3

""" Find the nearest Fibonacci number to a given integer

    Test speeds of various algorithms

    See https://stackoverflow.com/questions/40682947/fibonacci-in-python

    Written by PM 2Ring 2016.11.19
    Incorporating code by Rockybilly and Douglas
"""

from __future__ import print_function, division
from math import log, sqrt
from time import time

def fibs():
    a, b = 0, 1
    while True:
        yield a
        a, b = b, a + b

def nearest_fib_Rocky(n):
    ''' Find the nearest Fibonacci number to n '''
    fibgen = fibs()
    for fib in fibgen:
        if fib == n:
            return n
        elif fib > n:
            next_fib = next(fibgen)
            return next_fib - fib if 2 * n < next_fib else fib

def nearest_fib_Doug(n):
    a = 5 * n * n
    if sqrt(a + 4)%1 == 0 or sqrt(a - 4)%1 == 0:
        return n
    c = 1
    while True:
        m = n + c
        a = 5 * m * m
        if sqrt(a + 4)%1 == 0 or sqrt(a - 4)%1 == 0:
            return m
        m = n - c
        a = 5 * m * m
        if sqrt(a + 4)%1 == 0 or sqrt(a - 4)%1 == 0:
            return m
        c += 1

cache={0: 0, 1: 1}
def fast_fib(n):
    if n in cache:
        return cache[n]
    m = (n + 1) // 2
    a, b = fast_fib(m - 1), fast_fib(m)
    fib = a * a + b * b if n & 1 else (2 * a + b) * b
    cache[n] = fib
    return fib

logroot5 = log(5) / 2
logphi = log((1 + 5 ** 0.5) / 2)

def nearest_fib_PM2R(n):
    if n == 0:
        return 0
    # Approximate by inverting the large term of Binet's formula
    y = int((log(n) + logroot5) / logphi)
    lo = fast_fib(y)
    hi = fast_fib(y + 1)
    return lo if n - lo < hi - n else hi

funcs = (
    nearest_fib_PM2R,
    nearest_fib_Rocky,
    nearest_fib_Doug,
)

# Verify that all the functions return the same result
def verify(lo, hi):
    for n in range(lo, hi):
        a = [f(n) for f in funcs]
        head, tail = a[0], a[1:]
        if not all(head == u for u in tail):
            print('Error:', n, a)
            return False
    else:
        print('Ok')
        return True

def time_test(lo, hi):
    print('lo =', lo, 'hi =', hi)
    for f in funcs:
        start = time()
        for n in range(lo, hi):
            f(n)
        t = time() - start
        print('{0:18}: {1}'.format(f.__name__, t))
    print()

verify(0, 1000)
cache={0: 0, 1: 1}
time_test(0, 1000)

funcs = funcs[:-1]
cache={0: 0, 1: 1}
time_test(1000, 50000)

typical output

Ok
lo = 0 hi = 1000
nearest_fib_PM2R  : 0.005465507507324219
nearest_fib_Rocky : 0.02432560920715332
nearest_fib_Doug  : 0.45461463928222656

lo = 1000 hi = 50000
nearest_fib_PM2R  : 0.26880311965942383
nearest_fib_Rocky : 1.266334056854248

These times are on an old 2GHz 32 bit machine running Python 3.6 on Linux. Python 2.6 gives similar timings.

FWIW, both Rockybilly's and my code can easily handle very large numbers. Here's the timing output of time_test(10**1000, 10**1000 + 1000):

nearest_fib_PM2R  : 0.011492252349853516
nearest_fib_Rocky : 7.556792497634888
2

Keeping the previous fibonacci is not necessary if you don't mind making an extra generator call.

First store the generator inside a variable.

gen = fibs()

n = int(input("please, enter a number: "))
for fib in gen:
    if n == fib:
        print("Yes! Your number is a Fibonacci number!")
        break
    if fib > n:
        print("No! Your number is not a Fibonacci number!")

        next_fib = next(gen)
        prev = next_fib - fib 
        closest = prev if n - prev < fib - n else fib # Search for Python ternary operator
                                                      # If you are a stranger to this line of code. 
        print("The closest fibonacci number to your entry is %s" % closest)

        break

Edit: I first used gen.next() to get the next value of the yield, however I forgot that in Python 3, it is renamed as usage to gen.__next__(). Please take care using it. next(gen) is the expected usage for both Python versions.

  • 'generator' object has no attribute 'next' error at next = gen.next() statement – Ébe Isaac Nov 18 '16 at 17:55
  • Let me correct that, I actually written this with Python 2. – Rockybilly Nov 18 '16 at 17:57
  • Oh! So what's the alternative for Python 3.x? – Ébe Isaac Nov 18 '16 at 17:58
  • @ÉbeIsaac Please check the edit. – Rockybilly Nov 18 '16 at 17:59
  • 1
    @user7043763 You have to combine it with your code of course. Where your fibs is defined. – Rockybilly Nov 19 '16 at 8:43
1

You could zip fibs with itself:

n = int(input("please, enter a number: "))
for fib, next_fib in itertools.izip(fibs(), itertools.islice(fibs(), 1, None)):
    if n == fib:
        print("Yes! Your number is a Fibonacci number!")
        break
    if next_fib > n:
        closest = fib if n - fib < next_fib - n else next_fib
        print("The closest Fibonacci number is {}".format(closest))
        break

You could use itertools.tee to optimize it a bit.

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