1

My text file would read as:

111
111
222
222
222
333
333

My resulting file would look like:

1,111
2,111
1,222
2,222
3,222
1,333
2,333

Or the resulting file could alternatively look like the following:

1
2
1
2
3
1
2

I've specified a comma as a delimiter here but it doesn't matter what the delimeter is --- I can modify that at a future date.In reality, I don't even need the original text file contents, just the line numbers, because I can just paste the line numbers against the original text file.

I am just not sure how I can go through numbering the lines based on repeated entries.

All items in list are duplicated at least once. There are no single occurrences of a line in the file.

  • Save the current line in a variable. If the current line is equal to the variable, increment the counter, otherwise set it back to 1. – Barmar Nov 19 '16 at 0:42
  • Are the duplicate lines always together in the input file? – Barmar Nov 19 '16 at 0:43
5
$ awk -v OFS=',' '{print ++cnt[$0], $0}' file
1,111
2,111
1,222
2,222
3,222
1,333
2,333
1

Use a variable to save the previous line, and compare it to the current line. If they're the same, increment the counter, otherwise set it back to 1.

awk '{if ($0 == prev) counter++; else counter = 1; prev=$0; print counter}'
0

Perl solution:

perl -lne 'print ++$c{$_}' file
  • -n reads the input line by line
  • -l handles newlines
  • ++$c{$_} increments the value assigned to the contents of the current line $_ in the hash table %c.
  • I understand the rest but what does handles newlines mean? Handles them how? – Ed Morton Nov 19 '16 at 1:16
  • 1
    @EdMorton: See perlrun for details: it removes newlines from the input and adds them to the output. – choroba Nov 19 '16 at 8:51
  • I read it but it made no sense to me and I just don't understand what it would mean to remove newlines from the input then add them back to the output or why you'd want to do that. Oh well, thanks for the reference anyway. – Ed Morton Nov 19 '16 at 13:03
  • 1
    @EdMorton: Try to run echo $'a\nb' | perl -ne 'print length' and the same with perl -lne to see the difference. – choroba Nov 19 '16 at 22:29
  • first execution output 22 and the second output the error message Can't open print length: No such file or directory.. I was running on OSX FWIW. Oh, wait, I had used -nel instead of -len (that matters???). Now I get 1 then 1. OK.... so what is 22 the length of??? – Ed Morton Nov 19 '16 at 23:48
0
  1. Software tools method, given textfile as input:

    uniq -c textfile | cut -d' ' -f7 | xargs -L 1 seq 1
    
  2. Shell loop-based variant of the above:

    uniq -c textfile | while read a b ; do seq 1 $a ; done
    

Output (of either method):

1
2
1
2
3
1
2

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