1

As you know it is not possible to use the std::enable_shared_from_this and shared_from_this() pair from the constructor of an object since a shared_pointer containing the class is not yet in existance. However, I really would like this functionality. I have attempted my own system and it seems to be working OK.

namespace kp
{    

template <class T>
void construct_deleter(T *t)
{
  if(!t->_construct_pself)
  {
    t->~T();
  }

  free(t);
}

template <class T, typename... Params>
std::shared_ptr<T> make_shared(Params&&... args)
{
  std::shared_ptr<T> rtn;
  T *t = (T *)calloc(1, sizeof(T));
  t->_construct_pself = &rtn;
  rtn.reset(t, construct_deleter<T>);
  t = new(t) T(std::forward<Params>(args)...);
  t->_construct_pself = NULL;
  t->_construct_self = rtn;

  return rtn;
}

template <class T>
class enable_shared_from_this
{
public:
  std::shared_ptr<T> *_construct_pself;
  std::weak_ptr<T> _construct_self;

  std::shared_ptr<T> shared_from_this()
  {
    if(_construct_pself)
    {
      return *_construct_pself;
    }
    else
    {
      return _construct_self.lock();
    }
  }
};

}

Can anyone spot any flaws in this logic? I basically use placement new to assign a pointer to the shared_ptr inside the class before the constructor calls.

As it stands I can use it as so:

std::shared_ptr<Employee> emp = kp::make_shared<Employee>("Karsten", 30);

and in the Employee constructor:

Employee::Employee(std::string name, int age)
{
  Dept::addEmployee(shared_from_this());
}

Before I commit this to a relatively large codebase, I would really appreciate some ideas or feedback from you guys.

Thanks!

  • You can only create these via your custom make_shared; if you try to use any other form of initialization, it will fail at runtime. Just use the standard pattern of providing a static create() function that creates an instance, then does any operations requiring shared_from_this() before returning it. – Collin Dauphinee Nov 19 '16 at 1:14
  • Sorry but there's no way this sort of code passes review in my team. Can't you come up with a more simple and self-documenting design? What is the problem that you are really trying to solve, and why do conventional approaches not satisfy that goal? – Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 19 '16 at 1:17
1

I think there is a semantically problem with using shared_from_this() inside the constructor. The issue is when an exception is being thrown there is no valid object, but you already have setup a shared pointer to it. e.g.:

Employee::Employee(std::string name, int age)
{
    Dept::addEmployee(shared_from_this());
    if (...) throw std::runtime_error("...");
}

Now Dept will have a pointer to this object, which wasn't successfully created.

  • Ah but if we only do the addEmployee at the very end of the constructor and make sure to do a removeEmployee at the very beginning of the destructor, then this would also work for "class Manager : public Employee" inheritance. It would then also ensure that an incomplete Employee / Manager would never be in Dept after the make_shared<T> call. – Karsten Pedersen Nov 19 '16 at 15:26
  • I just noticed, your code works a little more unexpected: If an exception is being thrown in the C'tor of Employee, that will force a D'tor call. But the D'tor be called shouldn't if a C'tor throws. – Gene Nov 19 '16 at 15:45
  • You are right. Whilst I still need to free the memory, I should have really surrounded the call to the destructor in something like "if(!t->_construct_pself)" or something a bit nicer. I will fix that now. Thanks. – Karsten Pedersen Nov 19 '16 at 21:45

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