3

I am finding some weird behavior when using index.

#Defined in the class's initialize    
@my_list = [] of Type

index = @my_list.index { |i| i.value == 2 } # => 0

@my_list[0] # => 2
@my_list[index] # => error

I get the error:

no overload matches 'Array(Type)#[]' with type (Int32 | Nil)

Not sure why index does not work, as index = 0.

EDIT:

More information. If I do this:

if index == nil
  #Do something
#error => undefined method '>=' for Nil (compile-time type is (Int32 | Nil))
elsif index >= 0
  #Do something else
end

Which I understand. It could be nil, but since I'm already checking to see if it is nil there shouldn't be a problem here. I'm thinking the previous code snippet is running into the same issue.

4 Answers 4

3

The problem is that Array#index is nilable; it may not find anything and return nil, hence it returns an Int32|Nil union.

The compiler eventually fails because Array#[] expects an Int32 argument, but we pass it an Int32|Nil. You must take care of this case (to avoid later bugs) by checking if the return value is truthy for example.

1

As stated by @julien-portalier :

The problem is that Array#index is nilable; it may not find anything in the array and return Nil, hence it returns an (Int32 | Nil) union.

You can use Object#not_nil! to get ride of the Nil type :

@my_list = [2, 4, 6, 8]

index = @my_list.index { |i| i == 6 }.not_nil! # => 2
# compile type of 'index' is Int32

@my_list[0] # => 2
@my_list[index] # => 6

It will make sure the type returned by Array#index is not Nil, if it is, an exception will be raised (see Nil#not_nil!)


And if you need to handle an index error without using exceptions, you can simply check if Array#index failed :

@my_list = [2, 4, 6, 8]

index = @my_list.index { |i| i == 6 } # => 2
# compile-time type of 'index' is (Int32 | Nil)

if index
    # In this scope, compile-time type of 'index' is Int32
    @my_list[0] # => 2
    @my_list[index] # => 6
end
0

I'm just going to do this:

def get_index(val)
  i = 0
  while i < @my_list.size
    if @my_list[i].value == val
       return i
    end

    i += 1
  end

  return -1
end

This way only int values will be returned, no nils. It seems to work fine.

0

better way is to use times method it's more simple and more clear:

def get_index(val)
  @my_list.size.times do |i|
    return i if @my_list[i] == val
  end
  -1
end

UPD

or more simple

def get_index(val)
  @my_list.index { |value| value == val } || -1
end

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