I have a global struct that has an array as part of it as follows:

First Implementation:

When I print any value of the array with index higher that 490, it prints garbage value.

#define NUMOFROWS 512

struct matrix {
    int freeSpace;
    int allocSapce;
    unsigned long long bit_matrix[NUMOFROWS];
};

int main() {
    struct matrix b;
    b.bitmap_matrix[NUMOFROWS] = 0;

    printf("MA[0] = %llu \n", b.bitmap_matrix[0]);
    printf("MA[5] = %llu \n", b.bitmap_matrix[5]);
    printf("MA[511] = %llu \n", b.bitmap_matrix[511]);
    return 0;
}

OUTPUT:

MA[0] = 0
MA[5] = 0
MA[511] = 140734799804304

Second Implementation:

I changed it into this, then it worked fine.

#define ROWS 512

struct matrix {
    int freeSpace;
    int allocSapce;
    unsigned long long bit_matrix[NUMOFROWS];
};

int main() {
    struct matrix b;
    for (int i = 0 ; i < ROWS; i++) {
        b.bit_matrix[i] = 0;
    }

    printf("MA[0] = %llu \n", b.bit_matrix[0]);
    printf("MA[5] = %llu \n", b.bit_matrix[5]);
    printf("MA[511] = %llu \n", b.bit_matrix[511]);
    return 0;
}

OUTPUT:

MA[0] = 0 
MA[5] = 0 
MA[511] = 0 

Any idea why?

  • 4
    1. It's not a global array. 2. You're not initializing it to 0. Instead you're setting 1 element after last to 0, which is underfined behaviour. – HolyBlackCat Nov 19 '16 at 18:39
  • 1. Why not? It is defined outside the scope of main .. 2. why would it write over the range? + how could this affect my initial array? Thanks ! – Salma Nov 19 '16 at 18:43
  • 1
    It's not global because it is defined inside a struct. Global would mean it were defined outside any other scope. And b.bitmap_matrix[NUMOFROWS] = 0; is translated to b.bitmap_matrix[512] = 0; after preprocessing, while your highest "defined" index is 511. This may not affect your initial array, but you didn't initialize the actual values of it. – UnholySheep Nov 19 '16 at 18:48
  • What is NUMOFROWS? Provide a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example – too honest for this site Nov 19 '16 at 18:54
  • @Olaf thanks for catching that, it was a typo, ROWS = NUMOFROWS – Salma Nov 19 '16 at 18:58
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The structure b is not global, it has automatic storage (aka on the stack). The type declaration for struct matrix is global but the instance b is local to the main function.

As such it is uninitialized, any members you do not explicitly initialize is uninitialized, even just reading the values invokes undefined behavior.

Furthermore, you access an element of the array beyond the size of the array: b.bitmap_matrix[NUMOFROWS] = 0; invokes undefined behavior too.

Here is a simpler version using an initializer:

#define ROWS 512

struct matrix {
    int freeSpace;
    int allocSapce;
    unsigned long long bit_matrix[NUMOFROWS];
};

int main(void) {
    struct matrix b = { 0 };

    printf("MA[0] = %llu\n", b.bitmap_matrix[0]);
    printf("MA[5] = %llu\n", b.bitmap_matrix[5]);
    printf("MA[511] = %llu\n", b.bitmap_matrix[511]);
    return 0;
}

Output:

MA[0] = 0 
MA[5] = 0 
MA[511] = 0 
  • Great thanks! but how can define the struct as global? do I have to define it in another header then include the header in the main? – Salma Nov 19 '16 at 18:53
  • 1
    @Salma It doesn't matter where you declare the struct. It does matter where you make a variable or the array. Your array is inside of the function, thus it's local. – HolyBlackCat Nov 19 '16 at 19:00
  • @HolyBlackCat I finally got it, thanks a lot ! – Salma Nov 19 '16 at 19:11

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