I have an Javascript array of objects. I'm looping through the array with a forEach and checking for a specific match, and if that match is true, splicing/removing it from the array at the current index.

Am I mad?
When I find a match and splice/remove that object from the array, it seems like the array is automatically shifting, causing the next item to be skipped as the index is incremented. Is this true? If so, what is the most accurate way to loop and test each ALL of the objects in an array and delete ALL the matches?

Code example (mind you this is clearly not an array of objects, just a quick example):

var fruits = ["Banana", "Orange", "Apple", "Mango"]
document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = fruits;

function myFunction() {
    fruits.forEach(function(fruit, index) { 
      if(fruit == "Banana" || fruit == "Orange" )       {
        fruits.splice(index, 1);
      }
    })
    document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = fruits;
}
myFunction();

RESULT: Orange,Apple,Mango

In that example, Banana is removed, thus "shifting" Orange to 0. At this point, the index is then incremented to 1, skipping 0, or Orange altogether, and continuing through the loop.

The only solution I have at this point is replacing the deleted item with something in order to prevent the "shift".

Splice example

fruits.splice(index, 1, "deleted");

Result

deleted,deleted,Apple,Mango

My Question

Is this the best/most accurate way of deleting items/objects from an array by means of a loop?

Thank you for your time and advice.

  • Two solutions come to mind immediately: Push all non-matches in a new array, and at the end of forEach replace the original array with the new one. 2nd solution would be to iterate over the array index using standard for loop and decreasing the loop index i-- whenever you found a match. – connexo Nov 20 '16 at 4:15
  • A possible 3rd would be to use lodash lodash.com/docs/4.17.2#remove which would also replace splice and probably be the most convenient solution. – connexo Nov 20 '16 at 4:20
  • xyproblem.info – Joe Frambach Nov 20 '16 at 5:02
  • When I find a match and splice/remove that object from the array, it seems like the array is automatically shifting, What else would you expect it to do? That's what you're telling it to do. – user663031 Nov 20 '16 at 11:28
up vote 3 down vote accepted

In general, it's not a good idea to mutate the array that you are currently iterating through, for reasons you mentioned above. What your code is intending to do is a very common use-case called filter in Functional Programming. Read the docs on Array.prototype.filter. Pass the filter function the array and a predicate function to determine if the element is to be included in the filtered result. The filter function will make a copy of the original array without the unwanted elements.

Example code:

function myFunction() {
  var filteredFruits = fruits.filter(function(fruit) { 
    return fruit !== "Banana" && fruit !== "Orange";
  });
  // filteredFruits = ["Apple", "Mango"]
  document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = filteredFruits;
}
myFunction();
  • This worked beautifully. Thank you so much for the information and a solid code. For anyone that uses that code, don't forget to add the closing ')' for the filter function. – user2305363 Nov 21 '16 at 16:59
  • Fixed. Thanks (: – Yangshun Tay Nov 22 '16 at 0:24

You can't expect this code to work correctly when you modify the underlying array used in forEach, MDN Array.prototype.forEach as a section for this case.

Instead, you could use Array.prototype.filter or the traditional for statement.

Filtering is the solution. Try this

var fruits = ["Banana", "Orange", "Apple", "Mango"];
    function myFunction() {
        var newFruitAray = fruits.filter(function(fruit) {
            return fruit !== "Banana" && fruit !== "Orange";
        });

       document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = newFruitAray;
    }
    myFunction();

No, you're not mad.

Just as you described, it is true that removing an item from the collection causes the next item to be skipped when the index is incremented. Also, the docs say that the forEach callback is not invoked for index properties that have been deleted or are uninitialized (i.e. undefined).

The Problem

To avoid skipping as the index is incremented, you might consider using a counter variable that you can increment each time you remove an item. Then each time you access an item, use the counter to shift the index backwards, like so:

var fruits = ["Banana", "Orange", "Apple", "Mango"]

function myFunction() {

    var itemsRemoved = 0; // remember how many items you deleted

    fruits.forEach(function(fruit, index, a) { 

      var shiftedIndex = index - itemsRemoved; // update the index

      fruit = fruits[shiftedIndex];

      if(fruit == "Banana" || fruit == "Orange") {
        fruits.splice(shiftedIndex, 1); // item removed
        itemsRemoved++; // update counter
      }

    })

}

myFunction();

// fruits: ['Apple', 'Mango']

This hack will remove Banana and Orange, however, it has a major drawback: The forEach callback is only executed once per item in the array. Each time you remove an item, the array length is decremented by 1. So if you have 4 items and you remove 2 while iterating, then the forEach loop will only run twice, skipping over the last two array items. This explains why Apple will not be removed if you try to remove Banana, Orange and Apple:

Loop 1:

  • Executed: Yes
  • Fruits: Banana, Orange, Apple, Mango
  • Length: 4
  • Remove: Index 0
  • Length After Removal: 3

Loop 2:

  • Executed: Yes
  • Fruits: Orange, Apple, Mango
  • Length: 3
  • Remove: Index 0
  • Length After Removal: 2

Loop 3:

  • Executed: No
  • Fruits: Apple, Mango
  • Length: 2
  • Remove: n/a
  • Length After Removal: n/a

Loop 3 is never executed because by that point the loop has already run twice. It will not run a third time because after removing Banana and Orange the array length is now 2 and forEach will only run once per array item.

Key Point

In general, when you remove an item from a collection while iterating over it at the same time, the results of the iteration are undefined and may produce strange behavior, ambiguous errors, and silent failures. Some languages even throw a concurrency exception under these circumstances.

Takeaway

The right approach here is to copy the items you want from the existing array over into a new array, ignoring the items you don't want. Then you can either discard the old array or overwrite it with the new array:

var fruits = ["Banana", "Orange", "Apple", "Mango"]

function myFunction() {

    var newFruits = [];

    fruits.forEach(function(fruit, index){

      if(fruit != "Banana" && fruit != "Orange"){

        newFruits.push(fruit);

      }

    })

    fruits = newFruits;

}

myFunction();

// fruits: ['Apple', 'Mango']

To remove objects, the same idea applies, except you will be doing your checks against the object properties instead of strings:

var fruitObjects = [{name:"Banana"},{name:"Orange"},{name:"Apple"},{name:"Mango"}];

function removeFruitObjects(){

  var newFruits = [];

  fruitObjects.forEach(function(fruit, index){

      if(fruit.name != "Banana" && fruit.name != "Orange"){

        newFruits.push(fruit);

      }

    })

  fruitObjects = newFruits;

}

removeFruitObjects(); 

// fruitObjects: [ { name: 'Apple' }, { name: 'Mango' } ]
  • 1
    An extremely long-winded explanation which could be boiled down to a single sentence, namely "don't splice". – user663031 Nov 20 '16 at 11:27

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.