I trying to develop a simple file system (Linux kernel) and I'm thinking of using bitmap to keep track of used/free blocks as described in here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_space_bitmap

However, I could not find any implementation of such system in C. I would like to see some examples so I could implement a similar thing to my system.

Any suggestion where I could find them?

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's a quick implementation I made after reading this question.

int mem_block_size;
int mem_block_count;
uint *bit_map;
char *buffer;

void init_memory_map(int block_size, int block_count)
{
    mem_block_size = block_size;
    mem_block_count = block_count;
    buffer = (char*)malloc(block_size * block_count);
    bit_map = (uint*)calloc((block_count / 32) + ((block_count % 32) != 0), 4);
}

inline
int is_allocated(int index)
{
    return (bit_map[index / 32] & (1 << (index % 32))) != 0;
}

inline
void allocate_frame(int index)
{
    bit_map[index / 32] |= 1 << (index % 32);
}

inline
void clear_frame(int index)
{
    bit_map[index / 32] &= ~(1 << (index % 32));
}

char* allocate_block(int block_count)
{
    int index = 0, free_frames = 0;
    while(index < mem_block_count)
    {
        if (!is_allocated(index))
        {
            free_frames++;
            if (free_frames == block_count)
            {
                int frame_index = index - block_count + 1;

                index = 0;
                while(index < block_count)
                {
                    allocate_block(frame_index + index);
                    index++;
                }
                return (buffer + frame_index * mem_block_size);
            }
        }
        else free_frames = 0;
        index++;
    }

    perror("memory error\n");
    return 0;
}

The basic idea is, you maintain a bit map which keep tracks of allocated frames. each frame act's as a buffer of fixed size. when you are done with the frame you can mark it free by setting bit off in the bit map.

  • thanks a lot this is very helpful .. I have some questions if you don't mind .. why did you choose 32 in your division by blockcount? is it your assumption that the each block has 32 frames? and also I didn't get why do you have mode with 4? – Salma Nov 20 '16 at 16:07
  • 1
    @Salma oh that's because my bit map is defined as unsigned integer array. integer has 4 bytes which means 32 bits. And Yeah that mod 4 my bad. :p – amaneureka Nov 20 '16 at 16:25
  • 1
    To be more specific; that bit map is just a bit's matrix represented as integer array no relation with 32 frames size. – amaneureka Nov 20 '16 at 16:28

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