7

This code fails with g++ 4.9 and later (including build from svn current,) but compiles without warning with clang++ and microsofts compiler (from VS2015.)

#include <functional>

struct A {
  void operator()() const {}
};
struct B {
  void operator()() const {}
};
struct C : private A, private B
{
  operator std::function<void()>() const { return nullptr; }
};

int main()
{
  std::function<void()> f{C{}};
}

The construction of f in main() fails due to operator() being ambiguous in struct C.

Why does g++ consider this to be ambiguous? The function call operators in C are privately inherited and not accessible. Adding a private, or explicitly deleted, void operator()() const to struct C makes the code compile and use the conversion operator as intended. Why would these inaccessible operators not cause problems when the inaccessible inherited ones do?

6
  • That makes sense @ildjarn. So clang++ and ms compiler both have it wrong by accepting the code?
    – rollbear
    Nov 20, 2016 at 16:28
  • 1
    I'm not sure actually; access checks are indeed performed after overload resolution, but I honestly don't know where C's conversion operator comes into it. My gut instinct says GCC is right, but I won't stand behind that too much... Have an upvote, good question. ;-]
    – ildjarn
    Nov 20, 2016 at 16:35
  • 4
    privately inherited and not visible Incorrect, private doesn't mean invisible, it means inaccessible. Access is checked after overload resolution. Nov 20, 2016 at 16:40
  • Thanks @n.m. I miswrote. Edited. It does not in any way change the confusion that both clang++ and microsoft compiler accepts the code.
    – rollbear
    Nov 20, 2016 at 16:44
  • 3
    private is a red herring. Reported as gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=78446.
    – T.C.
    Nov 21, 2016 at 10:50

3 Answers 3

3

Constructor: template<class F> function(F f);

C++11:

f shall be Callable for argument types ArgTypes and return type R.

C++14:

Shall not participate in overload resolution unless f is Callable for argument types ArgTypes... and return type R.


In C++11, this constructor template is a better match than the conversion sequence involving the std::function move constructor and your user-defined conversion operator. So overload resolution selects the constructor template, which then fails to compile because f is not Callable.

In C++14, the constructor template is subject to a substitution failure, because f is not Callable. So the constructor template does not participate in overload resolution, and the best remaining match is the conversion sequence involving the std::function move constructor and your user-defined conversion operator, which is therefore used.


Clang compiles your testcase in both C++11 and C++14 mode. GCC rejects your testcase in both C++11 and C++14 mode. Here is another testcase that demonstrates the same problem in GCC:

#include <type_traits>

struct A {
  void operator()() const {}
};
struct B {
  void operator()() const {}
};
struct C : A, B {};

template <typename F, typename = std::result_of_t<F&()>>
void test(int) {}

template <typename F>
void test(double) {}

int main() {
  test<C>(42);
}

test(int) should not participate in overload resolution because std::result_of_t<F&()> should be a substitution failure, so test(double) should be called. However, this code fails to compile in GCC.

This is the same problem seen in your testcase, because this is the same mechanism used to implement SFINAE in the constructor template of std::function in libstdc++.

2
  • My real case is for C++14. I tagged C++11 because I saw the same error, not expecting the rules to have changed. Do you happen to have a GCC bug number?
    – rollbear
    Nov 21, 2016 at 5:07
  • 1
    private is irrelevant. GCC appears to treat this kind of ambiguous lookup as a hard error, but only for a function call expression.
    – T.C.
    Nov 21, 2016 at 10:40
2

The difference between clang++ and g++ seems to be because of some fuzziness of SFINAE:

...

A substitution failure is any situation when the type or expression above would be ill-formed (with a required diagnostic), if written using the substituted arguments.

Only the failures in the types and expressions in the immediate context of the function type or its template parameter types are SFINAE errors. If the evaluation of a substituted type/expression causes a side-effect such as instantiation of some template specialization, generation of an implicitly-defined member function, etc, errors in those side-effects are treated as hard errors.

Now, std::function<R(Args...)> provides a template constructor

template<class F> function( F f );

which (through utilization of SFINAE)

does not participate in overload resolution unless f is Callable for argument types Args... and return type R.

struct C from your example is not a Callable type, because of the ambiguity of operator() (the fact that the latter is inaccessible in C doesn't play any role at this stage of overload resolution). Thus, depending on the implementation of the is-this-type-callable check in the Standard Library your code may or may not fail to compile. This can explain the difference between g++ and msvc, but not the difference between clang++ and g++, which, using the same Standard Library, work differently - clang++ compiles your code and g++ doesn't. I don't exclude the possibility that the C++ standard defines strictly which of them is correct, however IMHO it is beyond what most C++ programmers should be able to figure out on their own.

1
  • "does not participate in overload resolution unless f is [Callable][3] for argument types Args... and return type R" Doesn't this only apply to C++14 onward? The question is tagged c++11.
    – ildjarn
    Nov 20, 2016 at 18:39
1

In C++11, std::function has a universal constructor

template<class F>
function( F f )

that "blindly" tries to treat f as a callable object.

It is selected (quite greedily) if the other constructors are not.

The private bases should not be required to break your code.

In C++14, there are rules about this overload only being considered in certain cases. It appears your C++11 compiler is enforcing such rules, but the private inheritance confuses it. This, however, is outside the scope of the question.

Here are the 1 arg constructors of std::function:

function( std::nullptr_t );
function( const function& other );
function( function&& other );
template< class F >
function( F f );

The one you want

function( function&& other );

requires a user defined conversion over

template< class F >
function( F f );

so this one should apply, and then fail to compile.

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