9

I have a JSON object like below,

"Data Center": {
        "TMSLevel2": {
            "Comp-NX2/4/5/6K": "NX2/4/5/6K",
            "Comp-NX3K": "NX3K",
            "Comp-NX7K": "NX7K",
            "Comp-NX9K": "NX9K",
            "Comp-ACI": "ACI"
         }
}

I named the file as map.js and import it by var map = require ('./map.js') from Node JS. I am accessing it like console.log(map["Data center"]["TMSLevel2"][name]). Now the name be "Comp-NX3K" or "Comp-NX3k" or "Comp-nx3K".

When it is "Comp-NX3K" it prints the corresponding value. But, if it is "Comp-nx3K" it prints "undefined" as there is no matching value. How to fix it ??

  • do you mean to say the json key will be changing it;s key or while searching you will change it's case – brk Nov 21 '16 at 5:13
  • 5
    there's nothing to fix - the code works as it should, you can't "make" javascript ignore case for object keys. You could make all the keys all lower case, then select using name.toLowerCase() – Jaromanda X Nov 21 '16 at 5:13
  • You can have a look at my answer below which used Object.defineProperty to mix and use as same as above map["Data Center"]["TMSLevel2"]["comp-nx3k"] – Aruna Nov 21 '16 at 5:54
11

You could create a function to do a regex check like so:

function findValueOfProperty(obj, propertyName){
    let reg = new RegExp(propertyName, "i"); // "i" to make it case insensitive
    return Object.keys(obj).reduce((result, key) => {
        if( reg.test(key) ) result.push(obj[key]);
        return result;
    }, []);
}

Example Usage

let result = findValueOfProperty(map["Data center"]["TMSLevel2"], name)
console.log(result);

You can bring it one step further my making it a prototype function

Object.prototype.find = function(propertyName) {
    return findValueOfProperty.bind(this, this);
};

And call it like so

var result = map["Data center"]["TMSLevel2"].find(name);
console.log(result);
8

Here's a quick hack:

let map2 = JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(map).toUpperCase());
console.log(map2["DATA CENTER"]["TMSLEVEL2"]["COMP-NX3K"]);

This loses the case of the values in the object, but it looks like they are all upper case, so maybe no problem?

  • 1
    This will work, but as I said it's a hack. The other answer is more correct. – Jim B. Nov 21 '16 at 5:20
7

JavaScript object attributes are case sensitive, which means that JSON keys are also case sensitive. However, assuming you don't have a gargantuan list, then you could use Object.keys, Object.values, and create a lower-cased index.

var searchedFor = ("NX3K").toLowerCase(); // make sure to have them match case
var data =  {
            "Comp-NX2/4/5/6K": "NX2/4/5/6K",
            "Comp-NX3K": "NX3K",
            "Comp-NX7K": "NX7K",
            "Comp-NX9K": "NX9K",
            "Comp-ACI": "ACI"
         };
var iKeys = Object.keys(data) // this is a list of all of the attributed above (Comp-…)
               .map( // this calls a function on every member of an Array
                  function(x){ // this function returns a lower cased version of whatever
                               // value it was given
                      return x.toLowerCase();});

// iKeys is now an array of lower-cased keys.
var myValue = Object.values(data)[
                      // wherever the searched for element shows up, 
                      // will correspond to that value.
                      iKeys.indexOf(searchedFor)];

I do have to warn you, the above will only match the first instance of the key. So if there are cases of Comp-NX9K and Comp-nx9k you'll only get one.

  • You could make it a function that checks if the exact case is not undefined first before lower casing the keys which might help if you have collisions in the data. – Spaceman Nov 21 '16 at 5:25
3

You can deep clone the map object to another object with all the keys lower cased and access the object properties with lower case key from the deep cloned object.

Sample:

var map = {"Data Center": {
        "TMSLevel2": {
            "Comp-NX2/4/5/6K": "NX2/4/5/6K",
            "Comp-NX3K": "NX3K",
            "Comp-NX7K": "NX7K",
            "Comp-NX9K": "NX9K",
            "Comp-ACI": "ACI"
         }
}};

function clone(obj) {
  var cloned = {};
  Object.keys(obj).forEach(function(key){
     cloned[key.toLowerCase()] = (typeof obj[key] === 'object' ? clone(obj[key]) : obj[key]);
  });
  
  return cloned;
}

var mapCloned = clone(map);

console.log(mapCloned["data center"]["tmslevel2"]["comp-nx3k"]);

1

Another nice solution using Object.defineProperty and with help of this, you can clone a new object and access its properties with any one of original key, lower cased key and upper cased key as below. You can mix them as well.

var map = {"Data Center": {
        "TMSLevel2": {
            "Comp-NX2/4/5/6K": "NX2/4/5/6K",
            "Comp-NX3K": "NX3K",
            "Comp-NX7K": "NX7K",
            "Comp-NX9K": "NX9K",
            "Comp-ACI": "ACI"
         }
}};

function defineProperty(obj, prop, val) {
  Object.defineProperty(obj, prop, {
     get: function() {
       return val;
    }
  });
}

function clone(obj) {
  var cloned = {};
  Object.keys(obj).forEach(function(key){
    var val = obj[key];
    if(typeof obj[key] === 'object') {
       val = clone(obj[key]);
    }
    
    defineProperty(cloned, key, val);
    
    if(key !== key.toLowerCase()) {
      defineProperty(cloned, key.toLowerCase(), val);
    }
    
    if(key !== key.toUpperCase()) {
      defineProperty(cloned, key.toUpperCase(), val);
    }
  });
  
  return cloned;
}

var map = clone(map);

console.log(map["data center"]["tmslevel2"]["comp-nx3k"]);

// mixed
console.log(map["Data Center"]["tmslevel2"]["comp-nx3k"])

// mixed more
console.log(map["Data Center"]["TMSLevel2"]["comp-nx3k"])

0

Normalize your json

var map =   [
                {"Comp-NX2/4/5/6K": "NX2/4/5/6K"},
                {"Comp-NX3K": "NX3K"},
                {"Comp-NX7K": "NX7K"},
                {"Comp-NX9K": "NX9K"},
                {"Comp-ACI": "ACI"},
                {"Comp-NX3k": "NX3k"},
                {"Comp-nx3K": "nx3K"},
];

var normalizeMap = [];


for (var i=0;i<map.length;++i) {
  for (var key in map[i]) {
    //console.log(' name=' + key + ' value=' + map[i][key]);

    if (key == "Comp-NX3K" ||  key == "Comp-NX3k" || key == "Comp-nx3K") {
      var key_ = "Comp-NX3K";  
      var value =  map[i][key];        
    }
    else {
      var key_ = key;
      var value =  map[i][key];
    }
    var item = {};
    item[key_]=value;
  }


  console.log(item);
  normalizeMap.push(item);


}

console.log(normalizeMap);
0

I have changed my JSON file like following...

var data =  {
            "Comp-NX2/4/5/6K": "NX2/4/5/6K",
            "Comp-NX3K": "NX3K",
            "Comp-NX7K": "NX7K",
            "Comp-NX9K": "NX9K",

            "Comp-NX2/4/5/6k": "NX2/4/5/6K",
            "Comp-NX3k": "NX3K",
            "Comp-NX7k": "NX7K",
            "Comp-NX9k": "NX9K",
            "Comp-ACI": "ACI"
         }

In this way, it works for a very small number of keys/combinations. But Object.keys is a better Solution

0

You can try this code. It could be helpful.

var res= name.split("-")[0]+"-"+ name.split("-")[1].toUpperCase();
console.log(map["Data Center"]["TMSLevel2"][res]);

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