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I am unable to connect to amazon ec2 instance (public domain) form office network. It works fine outside the office network.

Looks like something is getting blocked in the network. Not sure how to figure out or which logs need to be checked to find out what exactly is getting blocked.

Error Message: ec2-54-218-186-23.us-west-2.compute.amazonaws.com took too long to respond.

  • Is it Linux or Windows? What are the setting in your Security Group(s) associated with the instance? – John Rotenstein Nov 21 '16 at 10:16
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Typically, if the connection takes too long to respond, the problem is due to the Security Group assigned to the instance. Check that it is allowing Inbound access from the entire Internet (0.0.0.0/0) on your desired port (Windows RDP port 3389, SSH port 80).

Of course, opening up access to the entire Internet is not good for security, so it is better to limit it to a smaller range of IP addresses, such as your corporate network and your home IP address.

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Reason

Security groups enable you to control traffic to your instance, including the kind of traffic that can reach your instance. For example, you can allow computers from only your home network to access your instance using SSH. If your instance is a web server, you can allow all IP addresses to access your instance using HTTP or HTTPS, so that external users can browse the content on your web server.

Before You Start

Decide who requires access to your instance; for example, a single host or a specific network that you trust such as your local computer's public IPv4 address. The security group editor in the Amazon EC2 console can automatically detect the public IPv4 address of your local computer for you. Alternatively, you can use the search phrase "what is my IP address" in an internet browser, or use the following service: Check IP. If you are connecting through an ISP or from behind your firewall without a static IP address, you need to find out the range of IP addresses used by client computers.

Warning

If you use 0.0.0.0/0, you enable all IPv4 addresses to access your instance using SSH. If you use ::/0, you enable all IPv6 address to access your instance. This is acceptable for a short time in a test environment, but it's unsafe for production environments. In production, you authorize only a specific IP address or range of addresses to access your instance.

THE SOLUTION BEGINS HERE

Your default security groups and newly created security groups include default rules that do not enable you to access your instance from the Internet. To enable network access to your instance, you must allow inbound traffic to your instance. To open a port for inbound traffic, add a rule to a security group that you associated with your instance when you launched it.

Adding a Rule for Inbound SSH Traffic to a Linux Instance

  1. In the navigation pane of the Amazon EC2 console, choose Instances. Select your instance and look at the Description tab; Security groups lists the security groups that are associated with the instance. Choose view rules to display a list of the rules that are in effect for the instance.

  2. In the navigation pane, choose Security Groups. Select one of the security groups associated with your instance.

  3. In the details pane, on the Inbound tab, choose Edit. In the dialog, choose Add Rule, and then choose SSH from the Type list.

  4. In the Source field, choose My IP to automatically populate the field with the public IPv4 address of your local computer. Alternatively, choose Custom and specify the public IPv4 address of your computer or network in CIDR notation. For example, if your IPv4 address is 203.0.113.25, specify 203.0.113.25/32 to list this single IPv4 address in CIDR notation. If your company allocates addresses from a range, specify the entire range, such as 203.0.113.0/24.

  5. Choose Save.

You can find detailed solution here

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