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I wanted to compare different to build a string in Python from different variables:

  • using + to concatenate (referred to as 'plus')
  • using %
  • using "".join(list)
  • using format function
  • using "{0.<attribute>}".format(object)

I compared for 3 types of scenari

  • string with 2 variables
  • string with 4 variables
  • string with 4 variables, each used twice

I measured 1 million operations of each time and performed an average over 6 measures. I came up with the following timings:

           test_plus:   0.29480
        test_percent:   0.47540
           test_join:   0.56240
         test_format:   0.72760
        test_formatC:   0.90000
      test_plus_long:   0.50520
   test_percent_long:   0.58660
      test_join_long:   0.64540
    test_format_long:   1.03400
   test_formatC_long:   1.28020
     test_plus_long2:   0.95220
  test_percent_long2:   0.81580
     test_join_long2:   0.88400
   test_format_long2:   1.51500
  test_formatC_long2:   1.97160

In each scenario, I came up with the following conclusion

  • Concatenation seems to be one of the fastest method
  • Formatting using % is much faster than formatting with format function

I believe format is much better than % (e.g. in this question) and % was almost deprecated.

I have therefore several questions:

  1. Is % really faster than format?
  2. If so, why is that?
  3. Why is "{} {}".format(var1, var2) more efficient than "{0.attribute1} {0.attribute2}".format(object)?

For reference, I used the following code to measure the different timings.

import time
def timing(f, n, show, *args):
    if show: print f.__name__ + ":\t",
    r = range(n/10)
    t1 = time.clock()
    for i in r:
        f(*args); f(*args); f(*args); f(*args); f(*args); f(*args); f(*args); f(*args); f(*args); f(*args)
    t2 = time.clock()
    timing = round(t2-t1, 3)
    if show: print timing
    return timing
    

class values(object):
    def __init__(self, a, b, c="", d=""):
        self.a = a
        self.b = b
        self.c = c
        self.d = d

    
def test_plus(a, b):
    return a + "-" + b

def test_percent(a, b):
    return "%s-%s" % (a, b)

def test_join(a, b):
    return ''.join([a, '-', b])
        
def test_format(a, b):
    return "{}-{}".format(a, b)

def test_formatC(val):
    return "{0.a}-{0.b}".format(val)

    
def test_plus_long(a, b, c, d):
    return a + "-" + b + "-" + c + "-" + d

def test_percent_long(a, b, c, d):
    return "%s-%s-%s-%s" % (a, b, c, d)
        
def test_join_long(a, b, c, d):
    return ''.join([a, '-', b, '-', c, '-', d])
    
def test_format_long(a, b, c, d):
    return "{0}-{1}-{2}-{3}".format(a, b, c, d)

def test_formatC_long(val):
    return "{0.a}-{0.b}-{0.c}-{0.d}".format(val)

    
def test_plus_long2(a, b, c, d):
    return a + "-" + b + "-" + c + "-" + d + "-" + a + "-" + b + "-" + c + "-" + d

def test_percent_long2(a, b, c, d):
    return "%s-%s-%s-%s-%s-%s-%s-%s" % (a, b, c, d, a, b, c, d)
    
def test_join_long2(a, b, c, d):
    return ''.join([a, '-', b, '-', c, '-', d, '-', a, '-', b, '-', c, '-', d])
            
def test_format_long2(a, b, c, d):
    return "{0}-{1}-{2}-{3}-{0}-{1}-{2}-{3}".format(a, b, c, d)

def test_formatC_long2(val):
    return "{0.a}-{0.b}-{0.c}-{0.d}-{0.a}-{0.b}-{0.c}-{0.d}".format(val)


def test_plus_superlong(lst):
    string = ""
    for i in lst:
        string += str(i)
    return string
    

def test_join_superlong(lst):
    return "".join([str(i) for i in lst])
    

def mean(numbers):
    return float(sum(numbers)) / max(len(numbers), 1)
        

nb_times = int(1e6)
n = xrange(5)
lst_numbers = xrange(1000)
from collections import defaultdict
metrics = defaultdict(list)
list_functions = [
    test_plus, test_percent, test_join, test_format, test_formatC,
    test_plus_long, test_percent_long, test_join_long, test_format_long, test_formatC_long,
    test_plus_long2, test_percent_long2, test_join_long2, test_format_long2, test_formatC_long2,
    # test_plus_superlong, test_join_superlong,
]
val = values("123", "456", "789", "0ab")
for i in n:
    for f in list_functions:
        print ".",
        name = f.__name__
        if "formatC" in name:
            t = timing(f, nb_times, False, val)
        elif '_long' in name:
            t = timing(f, nb_times, False, "123", "456", "789", "0ab")
        elif '_superlong' in name:
            t = timing(f, nb_times, False, lst_numbers)
        else:
            t = timing(f, nb_times, False, "123", "456")
        metrics[name].append(t) 

# Get Average
print "\n===AVERAGE OF TIMINGS==="
for f in list_functions:
    name = f.__name__
    timings = metrics[name]
    print "{:>20}:\t{:0.5f}".format(name, mean(timings))
7
  • 3
    Use timeit instead of your custom function, it might that the first execution is slow but the subsequent function execution are faster but in reality you would only call the function once. docs.python.org/2/library/timeit.html Nov 21, 2016 at 7:12
  • As mentioned by @MaximilianPeters you should be using timeit for getting the trust-worthy results Nov 21, 2016 at 7:17
  • Thanks guys. I checked timeit but I should have been high that day because I believed it was only supported on Python 3.x and I am mainly using 2.7. Nov 21, 2016 at 7:20
  • 6
    Consider adding f-strings to you analysis from Python 3.6. It would be interesting to compare those results too. Nice code!
    – pylang
    Nov 21, 2016 at 10:24
  • 2

1 Answer 1

45
  1. Yes, % string formatting is faster than the .format method
  2. most likely (this may have a much better explanation) due to % being a syntactical notation (hence fast execution), whereas .format involves at least one extra method call
  3. because attribute value access also involves an extra method call, viz. __getattr__

I ran a slightly better analysis (on Python 3.8.2) using timeit of various formatting methods, results of which are as follows (pretty-printed with BeautifulTable) -

Type \ num_vars 1 2 5 10 50 250
f_str_str 0.056 0.063 0.115 0.173 0.754 3.717
f_str_int 0.055 0.148 0.354 0.656 3.186 15.747
concat_str 0.012 0.044 0.169 0.333 1.888 10.231
pct_s_str 0.091 0.114 0.182 0.313 1.213 6.019
pct_s_int 0.090 0.141 0.248 0.479 2.179 10.768
dot_format_str 0.143 0.157 0.251 0.461 1.745 8.259
dot_format_int 0.141 0.192 0.333 0.620 2.735 13.298
dot_format2_str 0.159 0.195 0.330 0.634 3.494 18.975
dot_format2_int 0.158 0.227 0.422 0.762 4.337 25.498

The trailing _str & _int represent the operation was carried out on respective value types.

Kindly note that the concat_str result for a single variable is essentially just the string itself, so it shouldn't really be considered.

My setup for arriving at the results -

from timeit import timeit
from beautifultable import BeautifulTable  # pip install beautifultable

times = {}

for num_vars in (250, 50, 10, 5, 2, 1):
    f_str = "f'{" + '}{'.join([f'x{i}' for i in range(num_vars)]) + "}'"
    # "f'{x0}{x1}'"
    concat = '+'.join([f'x{i}' for i in range(num_vars)])
    # 'x0+x1'
    pct_s = '"' + '%s'*num_vars + '" % (' + ','.join([f'x{i}' for i in range(num_vars)]) + ')'
    # '"%s%s" % (x0,x1)'
    dot_format = '"' + '{}'*num_vars + '".format(' + ','.join([f'x{i}' for i in range(num_vars)]) + ')'
    # '"{}{}".format(x0,x1)'
    dot_format2 = '"{' + '}{'.join([f'{i}' for i in range(num_vars)]) + '}".format(' + ','.join([f'x{i}' for i in range(num_vars)]) + ')'
    # '"{0}{1}".format(x0,x1)'

    vars = ','.join([f'x{i}' for i in range(num_vars)])
    vals_str = tuple(map(str, range(num_vars))) if num_vars > 1 else '0'
    setup_str = f'{vars} = {vals_str}'
    # "x0,x1 = ('0', '1')"
    vals_int = tuple(range(num_vars)) if num_vars > 1 else 0
    setup_int = f'{vars} = {vals_int}'
    # 'x0,x1 = (0, 1)'

    times[num_vars] = {
        'f_str_str': timeit(f_str, setup_str),
        'f_str_int': timeit(f_str, setup_int),
        'concat_str': timeit(concat, setup_str),
        # 'concat_int': timeit(concat, setup_int), # this will be summation, not concat
        'pct_s_str': timeit(pct_s, setup_str),
        'pct_s_int': timeit(pct_s, setup_int),
        'dot_format_str': timeit(dot_format, setup_str),
        'dot_format_int': timeit(dot_format, setup_int),
        'dot_format2_str': timeit(dot_format2, setup_str),
        'dot_format2_int': timeit(dot_format2, setup_int),
    }

table = BeautifulTable()
table.column_headers = ['Type \ num_vars'] + list(map(str, times.keys()))
# Order is preserved, so I didn't worry much
for key in ('f_str_str', 'f_str_int', 'concat_str', 'pct_s_str', 'pct_s_int', 'dot_format_str', 'dot_format_int', 'dot_format2_str', 'dot_format2_int'):
    table.append_row([key] + [times[num_vars][key] for num_vars in (1, 2, 5, 10, 50, 250)])
print(table)

I couldn't go beyond num_vars=250 because of the max arguments (255) limit with timeit.

tl;dr - Python string formatting performance : f-strings are fastest and more elegant, but at times (due to some implementation restrictions & being Py3.6+ only), you might have to use other formatting options as necessary.

4
  • 3
    Python: where it's OK to build strings to use to do timing tests on various methods for building strings... and then import an external library that builds a custom object with it's own __str__ that builds a string (and likely building that string out of strings that build strings within the process) out of all the results of your timing tests. Nov 24, 2018 at 4:01
  • 1
    Do you know or have at least an idea why the f-string and format versions seem to take more time for one variable than for two? Jun 3, 2020 at 7:29
  • 1
    The setup code for the 1-vars case is broken. It resolves to x0 = ('0',), which does not unpack the tuple. x0, = ('0',) would be correct. Use setup_str = f'{vars}, = {vals_str}' and setup_int = f'{vars}, = {vals_int}' (or attach the , to vars) instead to force unpacking. Jun 4, 2020 at 8:49
  • @ExternalCompilerError the issue was due to the incorrect setup as pointed out by MisterMiyagi. I've fixed it & the results are as expected now. Jun 4, 2020 at 9:14

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