7

Is there a way to achieve the following with TypeScript?

function add(x, y) {
    return x + y;
}

I want the following to compile:

add(1, 2);
add("hello ", "world");

But I do not want the following to compile:

add(4, "world");
add("hello ", 4);

Note also, I want it to compile for strings and numbers only.

7

You can do this with generic types:

function add<T extends string | number>(x: T, y: T): T {
  return x + y;
}

add<string>("a", "b"); // OK
add<number>(5, 3); // OK
add<boolean>(true, false); // Type 'boolean' does not satisfy constraint 'string | number'

Notice that you don't always need to give the generic type when calling the function, as long as it satisfies the constraints:

add("a", "b"); // OK
add(5, 3); // OK
add(5, "b"); // Type argument candidate 'number' is not a valid type argument because it is not a supertype of candidate 'string'.
add(true, "c"); // Type argument candidate 'boolean' is not a valid type argument because it is not a supertype of candidate 'string'.

As you can see, this is saying:

  • x and y must be the same type
  • that type must either be a string or a number (or an extension of either)

The TypeScript compiler is clever enough to work out the type without specifying the generics in the calls (but you must put them in the definition).


As you noticed, this is an issue with the TypeScript compiler. I've logged it on the TypeScript Github repo.

For now, you can do this:

function add<T extends string | number>(x: T, y: T): T {
    return <any>x + <any>y;
}

x and y are still of type T (ensured by the compiler) but we trick it into letting us do + on them.

  • 2
    Sadly it does not compile... Operator '+' cannot be applied to types 'T' and 'T' – Balzard Nov 21 '16 at 16:21
  • What version of TypeScript are you using? It may be an issue with the compiler. – James Monger Nov 21 '16 at 16:30
  • @JamesMonger Nope, it doesn't work even in typescript 2.2 (@next). – Erik Cupal Nov 22 '16 at 16:16
  • It's an issue with the compiler @Erigotto, I've logged it on the TypeScript GitHub. github.com/Microsoft/TypeScript/issues/12410 – James Monger Nov 22 '16 at 16:16
  • 1
    I've updated my answer for a workaround until it is fixed @Erigotto. – James Monger Nov 22 '16 at 16:20
1

It can be done like this:

function add<T extends string | number>(x: T, y: T): T;
function add(x: any, y: any) {
  return x + y;
}

let s = add("a", "b"); // fine
let n = add(1, 2); // fine
let n2 = add(1,"2"); // error

This is how you have to do it for now, although I'm glad @JamesMongar opened GitHub issue. If T extends the primitives string or number, then + operator on T must definitely be legit.

  • Nice solution @Erigotto – James Monger Nov 22 '16 at 16:26

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