28

set -e (or a script starting with #!/bin/sh -e) is extremely useful to automatically bomb out if there is a problem. It saves me having to error check every single command that might fail.

How do I get the equivalent of this inside a function?

For example, I have the following script that exits immediately on error with an error exit status:

#!/bin/sh -e

echo "the following command could fail:"
false
echo "this is after the command that fails"

The output is as expected:

the following command could fail:

Now I'd like to wrap this into a function:

#!/bin/sh -e

my_function() {
    echo "the following command could fail:"
    false
    echo "this is after the command that fails"
}

if ! my_function; then
    echo "dealing with the problem"
fi

echo "run this all the time regardless of the success of my_function"

Expected output:

the following command could fail:
dealing with the problem
run this all the time regardless of the success of my_function

Actual output:

the following output could fail:
this is after the command that fails
run this all the time regardless of the success of my_function

(ie. the function is ignoring set -e)

This presumably is expected behaviour. My question is: how do I get effect and usefuless of set -e inside a shell function? I'd like to be able to set something up such that I don't have to individually error check every call, but the script will stop on encountering an error. It should unwind the stack as far as is needed until I do check the result, or exit the script itself if I haven't checked it. This is what set -e does already, except it doesn't nest.

I've found the same question asked outside Stack Overflow but no suitable answer.

  • 2
    This question is not a duplicate. I asked this question three years before the other question. This question is specifically about finding a way to achieve the same behaviour as set -e, but inside a function. The other question simply asks about similar surprising behaviour. This question has far more votes, stars, views and useful answers covering different alternatives, and I think makes far more sense to keep open than the other one. If anything, mark the duplicate the other way round. – Robie Basak Mar 23 '18 at 16:35
  • In all fairness however, the answer on the other question is very on point, and answers this question as well. I'm not versed enough in bash to decide which should go where and how, but if a gold badge owner thinks that way, I'd be inclined to follow the dupe vote. – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Mar 26 '18 at 17:24
  • 2
    I have nothing against the other question. This question, however, is here for developers who want to solve the specific question I asked. It is clear that there is no good answer, but all the answers here provide something useful. I don't think it's appropriate to keep this question closed to new answers which might be equally useful. Providing an answer in the other question instead will hide it as that question asks a subtly different question ("Why does it do that?" rather than "How can I achieve this?"). – Robie Basak Mar 28 '18 at 10:03
  • I've edited the title (now taken from the original question body) to try to make this clearer. – Robie Basak Mar 28 '18 at 10:05
  • What's wrong with setting an error trap, as per the duplicate? – jthill Nov 14 '18 at 15:21
15

From documentation of set -e:

When this option is on, if a simple command fails for any of the reasons listed in Consequences of Shell Errors or returns an exit status value > 0, and is not part of the compound list following a while, until, or if keyword, and is not a part of an AND or OR list, and is not a pipeline preceded by the ! reserved word, then the shell shall immediately exit.

In your case, false is a part of a pipeline preceded by ! and a part of if. So the solution is to rewrite your code so that it isn't.

In other words, there's nothing special about functions here. Try:

set -e
! { false; echo hi; }
  • There's no pipeline. It's a compound command as opposed to a simple command. – Dennis Williamson Nov 2 '10 at 1:21
  • 1
    There is a pipeline, although a degenerate one. If you check with the standard (particularly "2.10.2 Shell Grammar Rules"), you'll see that a pipeline consists of at least one command (which may be simple, compound of func.def.) preceded by optional bang sign. There's no other way to introduce a negation except pipeline. – Roman Cheplyaka Nov 2 '10 at 6:21
  • 3
    This explains behaviour - thanks - but it doesn't really solve my problem. How do I get the behaviour of set -e, but localised to a function? I want to write my function with no care for whether individual simple commands succeed or fail, and have the function immediately return non-zero (presumably $?) as soon as any one of these simple commands fail. As Gintautas points out in another answer, combining with && will do this, but I want something that means that for convenience I don't have to change the body of the function. – Robie Basak Feb 16 '16 at 20:35
  • 2
    @RobieBasak I appreciate why you're asking that, but your request doesn't really make sense. set -e does apply to the contents of functions, unless the function is invoked in one of the ways excluded from set -e, as described in the documentation Roman linked to. set -e only applies to certain invocation contexts, so If you want your function to return as soon as something goes wrong no matter what appending || return to each command (or chaining everything with &&) is the standard solution. – dimo414 Mar 16 '17 at 23:42
  • 2
    Put another way, set -e is a fiddly beast, and often not really what you want your script to do even though it seems like a really useful hammer. – dimo414 Mar 16 '17 at 23:44
11

You may directly use a subshell as your function definition and set it to exit immediately with set -e. This would limit the scope of set -e to the function subshell only and would later avoid switching between set +e and set -e.

In addition, you can use a variable assignment in the if test and then echo the result in an additional else statement.

# use subshell for function definition
f() (
   set -exo pipefail
   echo a
   false
   echo Should NOT get HERE
   exit 0
)

# next line also works for non-subshell function given by agsamek above
#if ret="$( set -e && f )" ; then 
if ret="$( f )" ; then
   true
else
   echo "$ret"
fi

# prints
# ++ echo a
# ++ false
# a
  • Interesting. if ret=$( set -e; f );then exits f early with dash -e, but not with bash -e. I defined f() { echo a; false; echo "Should NOT get HERE"; }, since I wanted to test it with normally-defined functions, not subshell functions. – Peter Cordes Nov 14 '15 at 5:30
7

This is a bit of a kludge, but you can do:

export -f f
if sh -ec f; then 
...

This will work if your shell supports export -f (bash does).

Note that this will not terminate the script. The echo after the false in f will not execute, nor will the body of the if, but statements after the if will be executed.

If you are using a shell that does not support export -f, you can get the semantics you want by running sh in the function:

f() { sh -ec '
  echo This will execute
  false
  echo This will not
  '
}
  • Just to clarify, since the -f f looked confusing. If I have a function whatsamacallit, would I use sh -ec whatsamacallit to have the function to return at the first error? – Ehtesh Choudhury Apr 5 '13 at 3:14
  • @Shurane Yes, replace f with the name of the function. – William Pursell Apr 5 '13 at 11:00
6

I eventually went with this, which apparently works. I tried the export method at first, but then found that I needed to export every global (constant) variable the script uses.

Disable set -e, then run the function call inside a subshell that has set -e enabled. Save the exit status of the subshell in a variable, re-enable set -e, then test the var.

f() { echo "a"; false;  echo "Should NOT get HERE"; }

# Don't pipe the subshell into anything or we won't be able to see its exit status
set +e ; ( set -e; f ) ; err_status=$?
set -e

## cleaner syntax which POSIX sh doesn't support.  Use bash/zsh/ksh/other fancy shells
if ((err_status)) ; then
    echo "f returned false: $err_status"
fi

## POSIX-sh features only (e.g. dash, /bin/sh)
if test "$err_status" -ne 0 ; then
    echo "f returned false: $err_status"
fi

echo "always print this"

You can't run f as part of a pipeline, or as part of a && of || command list (except as the last command in the pipe or list), or as the condition in an if or while, or other contexts that ignore set -e. This code also can't be in any of those contexts, so if you use this in a function, callers have to use the same subshell / save-exit-status trickery. This use of set -e for semantics similar to throwing/catching exceptions is not really suitable for general use, given the limitations and hard-to-read syntax.

trap err_handler_function ERR has the same limitations as set -e, in that it won't fire for errors in contexts where set -e won't exit on failed commands.

You might think the following would work, but it doesn't:

if ! ( set -e; f );then    ##### doesn't work, f runs ignoring -e
    echo "f returned false: $?"
fi

set -e doesn't take effect inside the subshell because it remembers that it's inside the condition of an if. I thought being a subshell would change that, but only being in a separate file and running a whole separate shell on it would work.

  • 1
    Note: This will not work when this is part of a function that is again used with if, || , && , etc. :( – jomo Aug 24 '15 at 21:47
  • nicer-looking way to write the test: if ((EXIT)); then echo "f failed"; fi. Arithmetic contexts are quite nice for doing boolean stuff. – Peter Cordes Nov 14 '15 at 4:48
3

This is by design and POSIX specification. We can read in man bash:

If a compound command or shell function executes in a context where -e is being ignored, none of the commands executed within the compound command or function body will be affected by the -e setting, even if -e is set and a command returns a failure status. If a compound command or shell function sets -e while executing in a context where -e is ignored, that setting will not have any effect until the compound command or the command containing the function call completes.

therefore you should avoid relying on set -e within functions.

Given the following exampleAustin Group:

set -e
start() {
   some_server
   echo some_server started successfully
}
start || echo >&2 some_server failed

the set -e is ignored within the function, because the function is a command in an AND-OR list other than the last.

The above behaviour is specified and required by POSIX (see: Desired Action):

The -e setting shall be ignored when executing the compound list following the while, until, if, or elif reserved word, a pipeline beginning with the ! reserved word, or any command of an AND-OR list other than the last.

1

Join all commands in your function with the && operator. It's not too much trouble and will give the result you want.

  • Yes, I realise I can do this, but I don't like it. It's messy, too easy to miss one when modifying the function later, and gets complicated when dealing with other shell constructs and with control flow. The whole point of set -e is to avoid having to do this. I will accept the answer "there is no such mechanism" though! – Robie Basak Nov 1 '10 at 21:06
  • set -e has no "whole point" because it's a kludge. I use it all the time because it saved me a lot of time many times but I keep very low expectations about it and so should everyone. – MarcH Nov 14 '18 at 17:32
1

I know this isn't what you asked, but you may or may not be aware that the behavior you seek is built into "make". Any part of a "make" process that fails aborts the run. It's a wholly different way of "programming", though, than shell scripting.

1

You will need to call your function in a sub shell (inside brackets ()) to achieve this.

I think you want to write your script like this:

#!/bin/sh -e

my_function() {
    echo "the following command could fail:"
    false
    echo "this is after the command that fails"
}

(my_function)

if [ $? -ne 0 ] ; then
    echo "dealing with the problem"
fi

echo "run this all the time regardless of the success of my_function"

Then the output is (as desired):

the following command could fail:
dealing with the problem
run this all the time regardless of the success of my_function
  • 3
    My experiments show that using a subshell (my_function) call doesn't help here. You have just moved my_function execution out of the if statement and this has helped. I reopened this question here stackoverflow.com/questions/5754845/set-e-in-a-function . Please take a look if you know the correct answer. I appreciate it. – agsamek Apr 22 '11 at 11:16
  • 2
    When running the script above I only get this single line of output: the following command could fail:. The script seems to quit completely on the false command which makes it impossible to implement error handling. Tried it using bash and dash. – Daniel Alder Sep 24 '14 at 11:59

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