Hey there i have like +15000000 record on a text file and i need to process each line of them is using multi threading will be useful any suggestions ? like for example creating 10000 thread and dividing 15000000 / 10000 to give each thread small ammount of data ?

closed as too broad by Kevin Workman, Liam, Servy, WilQu, Qirel Nov 22 '16 at 16:00

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Why don't just try and see - will it be any benefit from multithreading or not? Anyway, 10000 threads looks too much unless you have processor with 1000 cores. – Andy Korneyev Nov 22 '16 at 13:33
  • Have a look at parallel Linq (PLinq): File.ReadLines(@"C:\MyFile.txt").AsParallel()...: compare parallel (i.e. AsParallel()) and sequential (comment AsParallel() out) versions – Dmitry Bychenko Nov 22 '16 at 13:33
  • There's a limit for how much threads you can open. – Fabricio Koch Nov 22 '16 at 13:35
  • I second the recommendation for PLinq in this situation. If that proves to be too simplistic, though, take a look at TPL (Task Parallel Library, the Task class primarily) rather than creating your own Thread objects, since it will intelligently create them as necessary and reuse, etc.. – Yushatak Nov 22 '16 at 13:36
  • Don't use 10k threads this will lead to disaster. Use the number of cores of your processor or x2. – mybirthname Nov 22 '16 at 13:47
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can play with Parallel Linq (PLinq):

var result = File
  .ReadLines(@"C:\MyFile.txt")
  .AsParallel()
  //.AsOrdered() // if you want to preserve the order of file lines
  .WithDegreeOfParallelism(10) // let's try 10 threads
  .Select(line => ProcessLine(line)) // whatever
  ...   

You can easy compare parallel version with sequential one: either comment out .AsParallel() and .WithDegreeOfParallelism(10) or add .AsSequential()

  • are you propose to speed up reading of file? – tym32167 Nov 22 '16 at 13:56
  • @tym32167: often, the file reading speed is a limiting factor (esp. in case when the file has been stored on HDD). We can try separating file reading and file processing (while next file's chunk is reading we can well process some prior lines). In the best case, the time required to read and process the file equals to the time required just to read the file. – Dmitry Bychenko Nov 22 '16 at 14:03
  • that's not what you are trying here. According with your code, you are trying read each line from file in parallel (and Im not sure that it safe or faster that sequental). And then, you want to process each line separately. How much context swithces it raises? But you dont know, how much time spends for process 1 line. From my point, if process 1 line is very fast, there should be only 2 threads, one for reading file and one for processing. – tym32167 Nov 22 '16 at 14:13
  • @tym32167: File.ReadLines uses buffer when reading lines (i.e. it reads, e.g., 8k of the file data and then split it into, say, 20 lines which are now in memory buffer referencesource.microsoft.com/#mscorlib/system/io/…, referencesource.microsoft.com/#mscorlib/system/io/…). The best degree of parallelism (2 or 10 or Environment.ProcessorCount) is mootable question, since we don't know (you're quite right!) the time required for the single line. That's why I recommended PLinq: the degree is easy to specify. – Dmitry Bychenko Nov 22 '16 at 14:23
  • I didnt get how the fact about buffer affects on concurrent access to File.ReadLines. I didnt found anything about concurrent access to File.ReadLined in MSDN. But still dont think that we can suggest anything to user without knowing about ProcessLine(...) function, because in case where ProcessLine is much faster than reading, its not make sense to use multithreading at all. If this ProcessLine is veery slow, it makes sense to change this ProcessLine to be able process chunk of lines at once. – tym32167 Nov 22 '16 at 14:40

You need a thread safe collection and a parallel loop. Say you read all lines into a thread safe list, you can use it this way:

required Namespaces:

using System.Collections.Concurrent;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

Code:

ConcurrentBag<string> items = new ConcurrentBag<string>(File.ReadLines(@"C:\input.txt"));
ParallelOptions po = new ParallelOptions() { MaxDegreeOfParallelism = 10 };
Parallel.ForEach<string>(items, po, line =>
{
    ProcessItem(line);
});
  • are you propose to read all data before starting processing? – tym32167 Nov 22 '16 at 13:53

That's really depends of your line processing function. For example, I generated file with 5000000 lines. Then I created 3 functions:

void Seq()
{
    foreach (var line in File.ReadLines(fname))
    {
        Process(line);
    }
}

void Parallel1()
{
    Parallel.ForEach(File.ReadLines(fname), line=>Process(line));
}

void Parallel2()
{
    var list = new List<string>();
    var tasks = new List<Task>();

    foreach (var line in File.ReadLines(fname))
    {
        list.Add(line);
        if (list.Count > 1000)
        {
            var local = list;
            list = new List<string>();
            tasks.Add(Task.Run(()=>local.ForEach(x=>Process(x))));
        }
    }

    tasks.Add(Task.Run(()=>list.ForEach(x=>Process(x))));

    Task.WaitAll(tasks.ToArray());
}

Then I wanted to test them in that way:

void Main()
{   
    var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    Seq();
    sw.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine($"Seq {sw.Elapsed}");


    sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    Parallel1();
    sw.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine($"Parallel1 {sw.Elapsed}");


    sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    Parallel2();
    sw.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine($"Parallel2 {sw.Elapsed}");
}

and my process function is very fast:

private void Process (string line)
{   
    for (var i = 0; i < 20; i++)
    {
    }
}

I got results:

Seq 00:00:00.9817211
Parallel1 00:00:01.0199068
Parallel2 00:00:00.6581931 <- fastest

BUT, if I make my function even faster

private void Process (string line)
{   
    for (var i = 0; i < 2; i++)
    {
    }
}

Seq 00:00:00.6474700 <- fastest
Parallel1 00:00:00.9247764
Parallel2 00:00:00.6642463

BUT2

if I make function slower:

private void Process (string line)
{   
    for (var i = 0; i < 200; i++)
    {
    }
}

Seq 00:00:04.3995186
Parallel1 00:00:01.4569537 <- fastest
Parallel2 00:00:02.0348749

So, there are no correct answer, which faster, It depends at least of Process function and Im sure that it can depends of other stuff, like parallelism settings.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.