5

So I manage to save multiple datas at once using laravel model::insert(array(...));

example data

array (
  0 => 
  array (
    'organization' => '1',
    'status' => false,
    'project' => '1',
    'act_date' => '2016-11-23 08:19:06',
  ),
  1 => 
  array (
    'organization' => '1',
    'status' => false,
    'project' => '1',
    'act_date' => '2016-11-23 08:19:06',
  ),
)  

What I want is to get the data, or the id at least of the inserted array. This data must also contain the multiple id's (array({ data[0].id=>1 }, { data[1].id=>2 })) corresponding to the number of data's inserted.

The problem with model::insert(array(...)); is that it returns true when successful and false otherwise.

model::create(array(...)); returns the data of the inserted row, but doesnt support multiple row inserts.

4 Answers 4

4

I would really recommend you to use create() method if you want to get an ID of each inserted row.

But if you really want to use insert() you could try this (method has it's own disadvantages though and I wouldn't use it):

model::insert($array);
$lastIds = model::orderBy('id', 'desc')->take(count($array))->pluck('id');
6
  • great, one thing tho what disadvantages are you refering? @Alexey Nov 23, 2016 at 9:31
  • 1
    @HardSpocker in theory you can get wrong last IDs inserted by another query on high load system. I guess it depends on DB type you're using and you better ask this question to DB guys. So, I would recommend you to use loop and multiple create()->id Nov 23, 2016 at 9:37
  • is there another way? i mean looping multiple create()->id takes too much time and resources if the array is large enough. Nov 23, 2016 at 9:45
  • @HardSpocker I don't know about any other way. Looping create() will usually not take a lot of resources, because usually inserting queries are executed not very often. I know one insert() is faster, but still, I would use multiple create(), especially on a high load system. Nov 23, 2016 at 9:50
  • from docs: "For LAST_INSERT_ID(), the most recently generated ID is maintained in the server on a per-connection basis. It is not changed by another client. It is not even changed if you update another AUTO_INCREMENT column with a nonmagic value (that is, a value that is not NULL and not 0). Using LAST_INSERT_ID() and AUTO_INCREMENT columns simultaneously from multiple clients is perfectly valid. Each client will receive the last inserted ID for the last statement that client executed." dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/getting-unique-id.html
    – jonlink
    Nov 27, 2017 at 18:13
0

I think this method is helpful for you

 $data = array(
        array (
    'organization' => '1',
    'status' => false,
    'project' => '1',
    'act_date' => '2016-11-23 08:19:06',
  ),
        array (
    'organization' => '1',
    'status' => false,
    'project' => '1',
    'act_date' => '2016-11-23 08:19:06',
  ),
///////
    );

    Model::insert($data);
    DB::table('table')->insert($data);
0

re: @Alexey Mezenin's concerns about returning the wrong rows on a high load system.

What works for me is to generate a random string, or you could use the current timestamp, and add that to each row I'm inserting, I call this "insert_key", then after the batch insert has finished, I query the DB for all records that have my "insert_key", now I have all the newly inserted ID's

0

Another way:

    $savedIds = [];
    foreach($data as $record) {
        $savedIds[] = Model::insertGetId($record);
    }
    $savedRecords = Model::whereIn('id', $savedIds)->get();

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