36

Why is the following illegal in C++?

auto x = unsigned int(0);

Whereas the following are all OK:

auto y = int(0);
auto z = unsigned(0);
auto w = float(0);

or in general:

auto t = Type(... c-tor-args ...);

(with the exception of Type being unsigned int).

  • 3
    Of course you could just say 'auto a = 10u' but you probably knew that. The syntax you're using has nothing to do with construction, even if it superficially resembles it. Use literals of the correct type and that's that. – Reinstate Monica Nov 24 '16 at 2:50
34

The syntax is Explicit type conversion (functional notation) here. According to the grammatical rule, it only works with simple type specifier or typedef specifier (i.e. a single-word type name).

(emphasis mine)

2) The functional cast expression consists of a simple type specifier or a typedef specifier (in other words, a single-word type name: unsigned int(expression) or int*(expression) are not valid), followed by a single expression in parentheses. This cast expression is exactly equivalent to the corresponding C-style cast expression.

You can change it to c-style cast expression or static_cast, or use it with typedef specifier as @Jean-FrançoisFabre suggested.

auto x1 = (unsigned int)(0);
auto x2 = static_cast<unsigned int>(0);

Quotes from the standard, $5.2.3/1 Explicit type conversion (functional notation) [expr.type.conv]

A simple-type-specifier ([dcl.type.simple]) or typename-specifier ([temp.res]) followed by a parenthesized optional expression-list or by a braced-init-list (the initializer) constructs a value of the specified type given the initializer.

And $7.1.7.2/1 Simple type specifiers [dcl.type.simple]

The simple type specifiers are

simple-type-specifier:
    nested-name-specifieropt type-name
    nested-name-specifier template simple-template-id
    nested-name-specifieropt template-name
    char
    char16_t
    char32_t
    wchar_t
    bool
    short
    int
    long
    signed
    unsigned
    float
    double
    void
    auto
    decltype-specifier
type-name:
    class-name
    enum-name
    typedef-name
    simple-template-id
decltype-specifier:
  decltype ( expression )
  decltype ( auto )
  • @Asu Yes, because it's a simple type specifier. – songyuanyao Nov 23 '16 at 13:24
  • Could you be specific about where that quote is from? Thanks :) – Steve Nov 23 '16 at 18:45
  • 2
    The quote and the answer are saying different things; note the colon : in the quote. The quote says that the specifier must be a single-word type name, but the answer says that single-word type specifier is not valid. – shoover Nov 23 '16 at 19:24
21

Because of parsing priority. The compiler is lost because int(0) is matched before unsigned int.

You have to enclose your type in parentheses:

auto x = (unsigned int)(0);

or use a typedef:

typedef unsigned int uint;
auto x = uint(0);
  • 2
    I'm not sure "operator precedence" is the right term here. – juanchopanza Nov 23 '16 at 13:02
  • 3
    I'm not sure either. What would you suggest? parsing priority ? I'm editing that way. – Jean-François Fabre Nov 23 '16 at 13:05
  • 3
    Parsing priority is probably sufficiently clear, but this is really just rules of the language's grammar. Function-style casts must be a single identifier. – Cody Gray Nov 23 '16 at 17:17

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