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I like the way infinite values on the x-axis are represented as half-points on the edges of the graph; after all, what could possibly go on the left of -Inf?

Unfortunately, I've been tasked with plotting infinite values on the x-axis as full points, away from the edges and with a corresponding tick mark.

Any idea how I can control those points?

Example of data to plot:

v <- c(-Inf, -5:5, Inf)
X <- data.frame(x = v, y= plogis(v))
ggplot(X) + geom_point(aes(x=x, y=y))

To re-iterate, I need the two extreme points to be away from the edges and with a corresponding tick mark.

Thank you

  • could you write a new scale? – Ben Bolker Nov 23 '16 at 15:21
  • hmm that's an idea. I'll look into that. – Murray Bozinsky Nov 23 '16 at 15:33
  • I tried but this solution still requires to know the minimum and maximum finite values in the whole dataset in advance: nonEdgy_trans <- function(){ scales::trans_new("nonEdgy", transform = function(x) {ifelse(is.finite(x), x, sign(x) * 6)}, inverse = function(x) {ifelse(abs(x) == 6, sign(x) * Inf, x)} ) }; ggplot(X) + geom_point(aes(x=x, y=y)) + scale_x_continuous(trans = "nonEdgy") – Murray Bozinsky Nov 24 '16 at 9:50
5

Here is a pretty simple workaround, where we set the -Inf and Inf to a real number then relabel the x-axis with Inf and -Inf:

Edit: to make the reassignment of Inf values more dynamic

X$x[!is.finite(X$x)]<-sign(X$x[!is.finite(X$x)])*(abs(max(v[is.finite(v)]))+1) 

ggplot(X) + geom_point(aes(x=x, y=y)) + scale_x_continuous(breaks=X$x, labels = v)

enter image description here

  • That was quick! Thanks. I thought of doing something along those lines but as I add more layers and data to the plot, this is becoming a bit unwieldy to check minimum and maximum values in all the data used. Not to mention that the plot won't adapt to the subsequent addition of new layers. Unless this is do-able? – Murray Bozinsky Nov 23 '16 at 15:12
  • If you are plotting multiple groups of data on one chart, just mind the abs(max) from a concatenated list of v's – emilliman5 Nov 23 '16 at 15:19

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