3

I have "TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for /: " for this code

class Foo(object):
    def __add__(self, other):
        return print("add")
    def __div__(self, other):
        return print("div")


Foo() + Foo()
add

** BUT for / **

Foo() / Foo()
Traceback (most recent call last):

  File "<ipython-input-104-8efbe0dde481>", line 1, in <module>
    Foo() / Foo()

TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for /: 'Foo' and 'Foo'
  • 2
    Please format your code properly next time. – Carcigenicate Nov 23 '16 at 17:20
  • + also works for strings as in "wor" + "ks!" = "works!". The /openand does not. – Ev. Kounis Nov 23 '16 at 17:23
  • @Ev.Kounis. For the same reason that this fails. So relevant to the problem but not the solution. – Mad Physicist Nov 23 '16 at 17:25
  • 2
    In python3, __div__ is replaced by __truediv__ and __floordiv__. – tdelaney Nov 23 '16 at 17:25
13

Python3 uses special division names: __truediv__ and __floordiv__ for the / and // operators, respectively.

In Python3, the / is a true division in that 5/2 will return the floating point number 2.5. Similarly 5//2 is a floor division or integer division because it will always return an int, in this case 2.

In Python2 the / operator worked the same way that the // operator works in Python3. Because of the way that the operators changed between versions, the __div__ name was removed to to avoid ambiguity.

Reference: http://www.diveintopython3.net/special-method-names.html#acts-like-number

  • 1
    For completeness, , __floordiv__ is also the special method for // in Python 2. __truediv__ can be used in Python 2 with from __future__ import division. See docs.python.org/2/library/operator.html – cdarke Nov 23 '16 at 17:31
0

In python3 you can use truediv:

class Foo(object):
    def __add__(self, other):
        return print("add")
    def __truediv__(self, other):
        return print("div")
  • 3
    Some explanation please. – Mad Physicist Nov 23 '16 at 17:24

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