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I am struggling to correctly parse the text. There is a lot of variation in the text. Ideally I would like to do this in Python, but any language would work.

Example strings:

  • "if magic code is 543, and type is 5642, 912342, or 7425, type has to have a period. EX: 02-15-99"
  • "If Magic Code is 722, 43, or 643256 and types is 43234, 5356, and 2112, type has to start with period."
  • "if magic code is 4542 it is not valid in type."
  • "if magic code is 532 and date is within 10 years from current data, and the type is 43, the type must begin with law number."

Results that I would like:

  • [543] [5642, 912342, 7425][type has to have a period.]
  • [722, 43, 643256][3234, 5356, and 2112][type has to start with period.]
  • [4542][it is not valid in type.]
  • [532][43][the type must begin with law number.]

There are other variations, but you see the concept. Sorry I am not very good with regular expressions.

  • What are the rules with the string part you are looking to grab? – idjaw Nov 24 '16 at 2:28
  • The results I want are in the post. – Luke all things spatial Nov 24 '16 at 2:30
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    There is a lot of variation in the text -- Looks like you want natural language recognition, not regular expressions. How – cricket_007 Nov 24 '16 at 2:32
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    @Lukeallthingsspatial yes, I see that. But you aren't clear on what are the rules with the matching. Also, cricket_007 is right. Based on the different patterns you look to match, you might want to consider a different direction. Unless you know the explicit rule boundaries like "match a sentence between digit, comma and ending in ." But if you are dealing with much more complex blocks of text, NLP might be the direction you want to go. – idjaw Nov 24 '16 at 2:33
  • The boundaries are not clear and defined. That was one of the problems I was running into. Thank you idjaw for the fast reply. – Luke all things spatial Nov 24 '16 at 2:39
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Well ... this does what you asked. But it's very ugly and quite specific to the examples you've provided. I suspect it will fail against the real data file.

When faced with this kind of parsing job, one way to approach the problem is to run the input data through some preliminary cleanups, simplifying and rationalizing the text where possible. For example, handling the different flavors of lists-of-integers is annoying and makes the regexes more complex. If you could removed the needless commas-between-integers and drop the terminal "or-and" the regexes can be much simpler. Once that kind of cleanup done, sometimes you can apply one or more regexes to extract the needed bits. In some cases, the number of outliers that fail to meet the main regexes can be handled with specific lookups or hard-coded special-case rules.

import re

lines = [
    "if magic code is 543, and type is 5642, 912342, or 7425, type has to have a period. EX: 02-15-99",
    "If Magic Code is 722, 43, or 643256 and types is 43234, 5356, and 2112, type has to start with period.",
    "if magic code is 4542 it is not valid in type.",
    "if magic code is 532 and date is within 10 years from current data, and the type is 43, the type must begin with law number.",
]

mcs_rgx = re.compile(r'magic code is (\d+ (or|and) \d+|\d+(, \d+)*,? (or|and) \d+|\d+)', re.IGNORECASE)
types_rgx = re.compile(r'types? is (\d+ (or|and) \d+|\d+(, \d+)*,? (or|and) \d+|\d+)', re.IGNORECASE)
rest_rgx1 = re.compile(r'(type (has|must).+)')
rest_rgx2 = re.compile(r'.+\d(.+)')
nums_rgx = re.compile(r'\d+')

for line in lines:

    m = mcs_rgx.search(line)
    if m:
        mcs_text = m.group(1)
        mcs = map(int, nums_rgx.findall(mcs_text))
    else:
        mcs = []

    m = types_rgx.search(line)
    if m:
        types_text = m.group(1)
        types = map(int, nums_rgx.findall(types_text))
    else:
        types = []

    m = rest_rgx1.search(line)
    if m:
        rest = [m.group(1)]
    else:
        m = rest_rgx2.search(line)
        if m:
            rest = [m.group(1)]
        else:
            rest = ['']

    print mcs, types, rest

Output:

[543] [5642, 912342, 7425] ['type has to have a period. EX: 02-15-99']
[722, 43, 643256] [43234, 5356, 2112] ['type has to start with period.']
[4542] [] [' it is not valid in type.']
[532] [43] ['type must begin with law number.']
  • How did you get good with regular expressions? Thank you for the post. Do you have any suggestions for the mere mortal on learning regular expressions? – Luke all things spatial Nov 24 '16 at 20:59
  • @Lukeallthingsspatial Mostly practice. Jeffrey Friedl's "Mastering regular expressions" is very good, but there are many other online tutorials as well. One key thing to focus on: the goal is not to learn regular expressions; rather, it is to become skilled at text parsing. That's a broader endeavor, with regex being only one tool among several. With text parsing, you want to focus on your points of leverage: which aspects of the text are the common points (the "regularities" so to speak) that will allow you to break the text down into simpler parts. Good luck! – FMc Nov 25 '16 at 4:27
0

Here's a solution with a single regular expression plus some cleaning up after the fact. This works for all your examples, but as stated in the comments, if your sentences vary much more than this you should explore options other than regex.

import re

sentences = ["if magic code is 543, and type is 5642, 912342, or 7425, type has to have a period. EX: 02-15-99",
             "If Magic Code is 722, 43, or 643256 and types is 43234, 5356, and 2112, type has to start with period.",
             "if magic code is 4542 it is not valid in type.",
             "if magic code is 532 and date is within 10 years from current data, and the type is 43, the type must begin with law number."]

pat = '(?i)^if\smagic\scode\sis\s(\d+(?:,?\s(?:\d+|or))*)(?:.*types?\sis\s(\d+(?:,?\s(?:\d+|or|and))*,)(.*\.)|(.*\.))'

find_ints = lambda s: [int(d) for d in re.findall('\d+', s)]

matches = [[g for g in re.match(pat,s).groups() if g] for s in sentences]

results = [[find_ints(m) for m in match[:-1]]+[[match[-1].strip()]] for match in matches] 

And if you need things printed nicely like in your example:

for r in results:
    print(*r, sep='')

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