I'm trying to make my program calcul all these multiplications: 999*999 , 999*998, 998*998, 998*997, ......... Until 100*100.

Right now, it only calcul 999*999 998*998 997*997 ... 100*100. I don't get why? Can you take a look on my code? Thanks BR

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <cmath>


int main () {
    int i = 999;
    int j = 999;
    while (j >= 100) {
        i == j ;
        while (i >= j-1) {
            std::cout << i*j  << std::endl;
            i -= j;
        }
        j = j-1;
    }

    return 0; 
}
  • 2
    i == j is the reason – apple apple Nov 24 '16 at 13:26
  • I already tried i=j; but the problem remain the same. It calcul only 999*999 998*998 997*997 .... – nolw38 Nov 24 '16 at 13:28
  • 1
    Listing a handful of numbers doesn't specify what the result should be. Until you can clearly and succinctly explain what you want to do, you won't be able to write code to do it, and, conversely, once you can explain it, writing the code will be simple. – Pete Becker Nov 24 '16 at 13:30
  • The specificity of my two variables's loop is that, instead of keeping a static j = 999 while i decrease from 999 to 100, then static j = 998 while i decrease from 999 to 100, ... I want my two variables to be active. But actually, my code is note effective because all the factors couted are for j= i. It is difficult to explain clearly ... – nolw38 Nov 24 '16 at 13:38
  • You will find your code easier to read (for you and others) if you format it well. To get you started, the web site codebeautify.org/cpp-formatter-beautifier can do this for you. – Andy Joiner Nov 24 '16 at 13:45
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are not seeing your loops correctly. Try to write the numbers you want to compute in a table first, and use it to build your loops.

For one value of your first loop variable - call it i, you want it multiplied by one, then two, then three (etc), values of j.

Regardless of what those values of j actually are, your loops should look like:

for(int i=999; i>=100; --i)
     for(int j=999; j>=i; j--)
           ; //computation goes here

Here you clearly see that for one value of i, you will use one value of j when i=999, then two values of j, then thre...

If you are new at coding, I would recommend starting with for loops and switch to while when you feel comfortable with the former ones.

You can use two for loops like this:

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    for (int i = 999; i > 99; --i)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < 2; ++j)
        {
            std::cout << i * (i - j) << std::endl;
        }
    }
}
  • Good idea ! I didnt think about it!! Anyway i would be glad if I could understand why mine didnt work -.-' :)) – nolw38 Nov 24 '16 at 13:39

I was trying to correct your code, but the inner while loop really should be deleted. After I deleted it, I can't tell whether I am rewriting it or correcting it. Anyway, it is delete, no need of it at all.

Here is the right code :

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <cmath>

int main () {
  int i = 999;
  int j = 999;
  while (j >= 100) {
    std::cout << i << " " << j << std::endl;

    if (i==j)
      --j;
    else
      --i;
  }

  return 0;
}

The logic is simple, whenever i==j, we --j. Whenever i!=j, we --i. We begin with i and j at the same position, during the loop, when i is one step behind j, i takes a step. When i and j is at the same position, j takes a step.

  • It works perfectly. Thanks! Its also simpler – nolw38 Nov 24 '16 at 13:44

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