13

It seems like the simplest question I can't find the answer for.

  1. I build a docker image.
  2. run docker images shows that it's present.
  3. I then add a new line to the Docker file.
  4. Then I rebuild the image.
  5. The old image is still in docker images and there's now a new image.

How does one simply update the old image without creating a new one?

My docker command: docker build -t nick_app . --force-rm --no-cache

(Note: I just tossed those --force-rm command and --no-cache command' because it seemed like it would work.)

Before:

Dockerfile:

FROM ruby:2.3.3
RUN apt-get update -qq && apt-get install -y
CMD ["echo", "Sup"]

docker images command:

REPOSITORY          TAG                 IMAGE ID            CREATED             SIZE
nick_app            latest              421662154c3f        9 minutes ago       746.9 MB
ruby                2.3.3               d00ebde6a601        2 days ago               730.1 MB
hello-world         latest              c54a2cc56cbb        4 months ago          1.848 kB

After: Dockerfile:

FROM ruby:2.3.3
RUN apt-get update -qq && apt-get install -y \
   build-essential
CMD ["echo", "Sup"]

docker images command:

REPOSITORY          TAG                 IMAGE ID            CREATED             SIZE
nick_app            latest              bcf9b3667202        3 seconds  ago       746.9 MB
<none>              <none>              421662154c3f        10 minutes ago      746.9 MB
ruby                2.3.3               d00ebde6a601        2 days ago          730.1 MB
hello-world         latest              c54a2cc56cbb        4 months ago        1.848 kB

Every dockerfile change I make creates a new none image on rebuild. They're cumulative so every time I make a change and rebuild I get another none image.

How does one get rid of that intermediate none every time I make a dockerfile change?

2
  • After all, you are creating new versions of an image, so what is happening makes sense. You'd have to wrap it in some way, i.e have a bash script that you call instead of docker build directly (taking the command show in the answers).
    – Arran
    Nov 24, 2016 at 17:19
  • It makes sense in the way that when I make changes to textfile it's technically a new version of the textfile but the word processor still handles updating the new textfile in place without creating intermediates. Seems like this could be a useful case for the Docker application peeps: if I rebuild with the same tag assume it will be the same image and delete all intermediates/old versions. Nov 24, 2016 at 17:26

1 Answer 1

14

Those <none>:<none> are actually the old version of your application, that has lost its named pointer, since you moved the nick_app:latest to your new build.

When building your image, I don't think that you can tell it to destroy the old image, it will simply create a new one. But there is a command that helps you to list or remove those dangling images :

docker images --filter dangling=true #lists all images that are dangling and has no pointer to it
docker rmi `docker images --filter dangling=true -q` #Removes all those images.
3
  • 5
    Thanks for the info. Not loving that there's no flag or option to do this automatically. It seems like a pretty common use case. I've got the short cut docker rmi $(docker images -f "dangling=true" -q) but seems a little inelegant to have to do this every rebuild. Nov 24, 2016 at 17:20
  • is there a difference between dicker image rm and docker rmi?
    – CpILL
    Aug 28, 2018 at 9:23
  • @CpILL it's docker, not dicker lol. docker rmi is to remove the images with the same id, but different tags. Whereas docker image rm is to remove docker image, which isn't under above scenario.
    – KunYu Tsai
    Apr 15, 2020 at 9:09

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