I am trying to store a JSON object in MySQL database in spring boot. I know I am doing something wrong but I a can't figure out what it is because I am fairly new to Spring.

I have a rest endpoint where I get the following JSON object (via HTTP PUT) and I need to store it in database so that the user can fetch it later (via HTTP GET).

{
  "A": {
    "Name": "Cat",
    "Age": "1"
  },
  "B": {
    "Name": "Dog",
    "Age": "2"
  },
  "C": {
    "Name": "Horse",
    "Age": "1"
  }
}

Note that in the above case The number of keys in the object may vary, Due to that requirement I am using a HashMap to catch the object in the controller.

@RequestMapping(method = RequestMethod.POST)
    public String addPostCollection(@RequestBody HashMap<String, Animal> hp) {

        hp.forEach((x, y) -> {
            postRepository.save(hp.get(x));
        });

        return "OK";

    }

As you can see in the method, I can iterate the HashMap and persist each Animal object in db. But I am looking for a way to persist the entire HashMap in a single record. I have did some reading and they suggest me to use a @ManyToMany mapping.

Can anyone point me in a direction to persist the HashMap in a different way? (or is using the @ManyToMany the only and right way to do this?)

  • "entire HashMap in a single record" ?? Or entire hashmap in a single db transaction? – Ramanujan R Nov 25 '16 at 10:29
  • I meant single record. – Fawzan Nov 25 '16 at 12:10
up vote 13 down vote accepted

As I explained in this article, it's very easy to persist JSON object using Hibernate.

You don’t have to create all these types manually, you can simply get them via Maven Central using the following dependency:

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.vladmihalcea</groupId>
    <artifactId>hibernate-types-52</artifactId>
    <version>${hibernate-types.version}</version> 
</dependency> 

For more info, check out the hibernate-types open-source project.

Now, to explain how it all works.

Assuming you have the following entity:

@Entity(name = "Book")
@Table(name = "book")
@TypeDef(
    name = "jsonb-node", 
    typeClass = JsonNodeBinaryType.class
)
public class Book {

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue
    private Long id;

    @NaturalId
    private String isbn;

    @Type( type = "jsonb-node" )
    @Column(columnDefinition = "jsonb")
    private JsonNode properties;

    //Getters and setters omitted for brevity
}

Notice two things in the code snippet above:

  • the @TypeDef is used to define a new custom Hibernate Type, jsonb-node which is handled by the JsonNodeBinaryType
  • the properties attribute has a jsonb column type and it's mapped as a Jackson JsonNode

The JsonNodeBinaryType is implemented like this:

public class JsonNodeBinaryType
    extends AbstractSingleColumnStandardBasicType<JsonNode> {

    public JsonNodeBinaryType() {
        super( 
            JsonBinarySqlTypeDescriptor.INSTANCE, 
            JsonNodeTypeDescriptor.INSTANCE 
        );
    }

    public String getName() {
        return "jsonb-node";
    }
}

The JsonBinarySqlTypeDescriptor looks as follows:

public class JsonBinarySqlTypeDescriptor 
    extends AbstractJsonSqlTypeDescriptor {

    public static final JsonBinarySqlTypeDescriptor INSTANCE = 
        new JsonBinarySqlTypeDescriptor();

    @Override
    public <X> ValueBinder<X> getBinder(
            final JavaTypeDescriptor<X> javaTypeDescriptor
        ) {
        return new BasicBinder<X>(javaTypeDescriptor, this) {
            @Override
            protected void doBind(
                    PreparedStatement st, 
                    X value, 
                    int index, 
                    WrapperOptions options
                ) throws SQLException {
                st.setObject(
                    index, 
                    javaTypeDescriptor.unwrap(
                        value, 
                        JsonNode.class, 
                        options
                    ), 
                    getSqlType()
                );
            }

            @Override
            protected void doBind(
                    CallableStatement st, 
                    X value, 
                    String name, 
                    WrapperOptions options
                ) throws SQLException {
                st.setObject(
                    name, 
                    javaTypeDescriptor.unwrap(
                        value, 
                        JsonNode.class, 
                        options
                    ), 
                    getSqlType()
                );
            }
        };
    }
}

The AbstractJsonSqlTypeDescriptor source code can be visualized in this article.

Now, the JsonNodeTypeDescriptor is responsible for transforming the JsonNode into various representations which might be used by the underlying JDBC Driver during binding parameters or fetching from the JSON object from the underlying ResultSet.

public class JsonNodeTypeDescriptor
        extends AbstractTypeDescriptor<JsonNode> {

    public static final JsonNodeTypeDescriptor INSTANCE = 
        new JsonNodeTypeDescriptor();

    public JsonNodeTypeDescriptor() {
        super( 
            JsonNode.class, 
            new MutableMutabilityPlan<JsonNode>() {
                @Override
                protected JsonNode deepCopyNotNull(
                        JsonNode value
                    ) {
                    return JacksonUtil.clone(value);
                }
            }
        );
    }

    @Override
    public boolean areEqual(JsonNode one, JsonNode another) {
        if ( one == another ) {
            return true;
        }
        if ( one == null || another == null ) {
            return false;
        }
        return
            JacksonUtil.toJsonNode(
                JacksonUtil.toString(one)
            ).equals(
                JacksonUtil.toJsonNode(
                    JacksonUtil.toString(another)
                )
            );
    }

    @Override
    public String toString(JsonNode value) {
        return JacksonUtil.toString(value);
    }

    @Override
    public JsonNode fromString(String string) {
        return JacksonUtil.toJsonNode(string);
    }

    @SuppressWarnings({ "unchecked" })
    @Override
    public <X> X unwrap(
            JsonNode value, 
            Class<X> type, 
            WrapperOptions options
        ) {
        if ( value == null ) {
            return null;
        }
        if ( String.class.isAssignableFrom( type ) ) {
            return (X) toString(value);
        }
        if ( JsonNode.class.isAssignableFrom( type ) ) {
            return (X) JacksonUtil.toJsonNode(toString(value));
        }
        throw unknownUnwrap( type );
    }

    @Override
    public <X> JsonNode wrap(X value, WrapperOptions options) {
        if ( value == null ) {
            return null;
        }
        return fromString(value.toString());
    }

}

That's it!

Now, if you save an entity:

Book book = new Book();
book.setIsbn( "978-9730228236" );
book.setProperties(
    JacksonUtil.toJsonNode(
        "{" +
        "   \"title\": \"High-Performance Java Persistence\"," +
        "   \"author\": \"Vlad Mihalcea\"," +
        "   \"publisher\": \"Amazon\"," +
        "   \"price\": 44.99" +
        "}"
    )
);

entityManager.persist( book );

Hibernate is going to generate the following SQL statement:

INSERT INTO
    book 
(
    isbn, 
    properties, 
    id
) 
VALUES
(
    '978-9730228236', 
    '{"title":"High-Performance Java Persistence","author":"Vlad Mihalcea","publisher":"Amazon","price":44.99}',  
    1
)

And you can also load it back and modify it:

Session session = entityManager.unwrap( Session.class );

Book book = session
    .bySimpleNaturalId( Book.class )
    .load( "978-9730228236" );

LOGGER.info( "Book details: {}", book.getProperties() );

book.setProperties(
    JacksonUtil.toJsonNode(
        "{" +
        "   \"title\": \"High-Performance Java Persistence\"," +
        "   \"author\": \"Vlad Mihalcea\"," +
        "   \"publisher\": \"Amazon\"," +
        "   \"price\": 44.99," +
        "   \"url\": \"https://www.amazon.com/High-Performance-Java-Persistence-Vlad-Mihalcea/dp/973022823X/\"" +
        "}"
    )
);

Hibernate taking caare of the UPDATE statement for you:

SELECT  b.id AS id1_0_
FROM    book b
WHERE   b.isbn = '978-9730228236'

SELECT  b.id AS id1_0_0_ ,
        b.isbn AS isbn2_0_0_ ,
        b.properties AS properti3_0_0_
FROM    book b
WHERE   b.id = 1

-- Book details: {"price":44.99,"title":"High-Performance Java Persistence","author":"Vlad Mihalcea","publisher":"Amazon"}

UPDATE
    book 
SET
    properties = '{"title":"High-Performance Java Persistence","author":"Vlad Mihalcea","publisher":"Amazon","price":44.99,"url":"https://www.amazon.com/High-Performance-Java-Persistence-Vlad-Mihalcea/dp/973022823X/"}'
WHERE
    id = 1

All code avilable on GitHub.

  • Thank you for the tip! However, can you make this work with H2 database which does not know any JSON type? I use Spring Boot and H2 for testing. Perhaps overriding H2 dialect somehow to treat JSON type as text? But did not figure how.. Thanks – vernjan Nov 25 '17 at 10:40
  • If you don't run H2 in production and you use it for testing, while your production system uses PostgreSQL or MySQL, then your integration tests have no value at all. You need to use the same DB you use in production for testing. Check out this article to see how you cna run integration tests on PostgreSQL and MySQL almost as fast as on an in-memory DB. – Vlad Mihalcea Nov 25 '17 at 11:23

You can use FasterXML (or similar) to parse the Json into an actual object (you need to define the class) and use Json.toJson(yourObj).toString() to retrieve the Json String. It also simplifies working with the objects since your data class may also have functionality.

Your JSON is well structered, so usually theres no need to persist the entire map in one single record. You won't be able to use the Hibernate/JPA query functions and a lot more.

If you really want to persist the entire map in one single record, you could persist the map in its string representation and, as already proposed, use a JSON parser like Jackson to rebuild your HashMap

@Entity
public class Animals {

  private String animalsString;

  public void setAnimalsString(String val) {
    this.animalsString = val;
  }

  public String getAnimalsString() {
    return this.animalsMap;
  }

  public HashMap<String, Animal> getAnimalsMap() {
    ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
    TypeReference<HashMap<String,Animal>> typeRef = new TypeReference<HashMap<String,Animal>>() {};
    return mapper.readValue(animalsString, typeRef); 
  }

}

Your animal class:

public class Animal {

  private String name;
  private int age;

  /* getter and setter */
  /* ... */
}

And you could change your controller method to

@RequestMapping(method = RequestMethod.POST)
public String addPostCollection(@RequestBody String hp) {
  Animals animals = new Animals();
  animals.setAnimalsString(hp);
  animalsRepository.save(hp);
  return "OK";
}
  • I think this is the best option for me. Saving the Objects as string and map it to a Map. – Fawzan Nov 27 '16 at 13:28

One animal is one record. You are saving more records, not one record. You can commit more records in one transaction. See: How to persist a lot of entities (JPA)

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