At the company I’m working for, we’re developing a large scale application with multiple forms, that the user needs to fill in in order to register for our program. When all questions have been answered, then the user reaches a section that sums up all their answers, highlights invalid answers and gives the user the chance to revisit any of the preceding form steps and revise their answers. This logic will be repeated across a range of top-level sections, each having multiple steps/pages and a summary page.

To accomplish this, we have created a component for each separate form step (they are categories like “Personal Details” or “Qualifications” etc.) along with their respective routes and a component for the Summary Page.

In order to keep it as DRY as possible, we started creating a “master” service which holds the information for all the different form steps (values, validity etc.).

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { Validators } from '@angular/forms';
import { ValidationService } from '../components/validation/index';

@Injectable()
export class FormControlsService {
  static getFormControls() {
    return [
      {
        name: 'personalDetailsForm$',
        groups: {
          name$: [
            {
              name: 'firstname$',
              validations: [
                Validators.required,
                Validators.minLength(2)
              ]
            },
            {
              name: 'lastname$',
              validations: [
                Validators.required,
                Validators.minLength(2)
              ]
            }
          ],
          gender$: [
            {
              name: 'gender$',
              validations: [
                Validators.required
              ]
            }
          ],
          address$: [
            {
              name: 'streetaddress$',
              validations: [
                Validators.required
              ]
            },
            {
              name: 'city$',
              validations: [
                Validators.required
              ]
            },
            {
              name: 'state$',
              validations: [
                Validators.required
              ]
            },
            {
              name: 'zip$',
              validations: [
                Validators.required
              ]
            },
            {
              name: 'country$',
              validations: [
                Validators.required
              ]
            }
          ],
          phone$: [
            {
              name: 'phone$',
              validations: [
                Validators.required
              ]
            },
            {
              name: 'countrycode$',
              validations: [
                Validators.required
              ]
            }
          ],
        }
      },
      {
        name: 'parentForm$',
        groups: {
          all: [
            {
              name: 'parentName$',
              validations: [
                Validators.required
              ]
            },
            {
              name: 'parentEmail$',
              validations: [
                ValidationService.emailValidator
              ]
            },
            {
              name: 'parentOccupation$'
            },
            {
              name: 'parentTelephone$'
            }
          ]
        }
      },
      {
        name: 'responsibilitiesForm$',
        groups: {
          all: [
            {
              name: 'hasDrivingLicense$',
              validations: [
                Validators.required,
              ]
            },
            {
              name: 'drivingMonth$',
              validations: [
                ValidationService.monthValidator
              ]
            },
            {
              name: 'drivingYear$',
              validations: [
                ValidationService.yearValidator
              ]
            },
            {
              name: 'driveTimesPerWeek$',
              validations: [
                Validators.required
              ]
            },
          ]
        }
      }
    ];
  }
}

That service is being used by all the components in order to set up the HTML form bindings for each, by accessing the corresponding object key and creating nested form groups, as well as by the Summary page, whose presentation layer is only 1way bound (Model -> View).

export class FormManagerService {
    mainForm: FormGroup;

    constructor(private fb: FormBuilder) {
    }

    setupFormControls() {
        let allForms = {};
        this.forms = FormControlsService.getFormControls();

        for (let form of this.forms) {

            let resultingForm = {};

            Object.keys(form['groups']).forEach(group => {

                let formGroup = {};
                for (let field of form['groups'][group]) {
                    formGroup[field.name] = ['', this.getFieldValidators(field)];
                }

                resultingForm[group] = this.fb.group(formGroup);
            });

            allForms[form.name] = this.fb.group(resultingForm);
        }

        this.mainForm = this.fb.group(allForms);
    }

    getFieldValidators(field): Validators[] {
        let result = [];

        for (let validation of field.validations) {
            result.push(validation);
        }

        return (result.length > 0) ? [Validators.compose(result)] : [];
    }
}

After, we started using the following syntax in the components in order to reach the form controls specified in the master form service:

personalDetailsForm$: AbstractControl;
streetaddress$: AbstractControl;

constructor(private fm: FormManagerService) {
    this.personalDetailsForm$ = this.fm.mainForm.controls['personalDetailsForm$'];
    this.streetaddress$ = this.personalDetailsForm$['controls']['address$']['controls']['streetaddress$'];
}

which seems like a code smell in our inexperienced eyes. We have strong concerns how an application like this will scale, given the amount of sections we'll have in the end.

We’ve been discussing different solutions but we can’t come up with one that leverages Angular’s form engine, allows us to keep our validation hierarchy intact and is also simple.

Is there a better way to achieve what we’re trying to do?

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

I commented elsewhere about @ngrx/store, and while I still recommend it, I believe I was misunderstanding your problem slightly.

Anyway, your FormsControlService is basically a global const. Seriously, replace the export class FormControlService ... with

export const formControlsDefinitions = {
   // ...
};

and what difference does it make? Instead of getting a service, you just import the object. And since we're now thinking of it as a typed const global, we can define the interfaces we use...

export interface ModelControl<T> {
    name: string;
    validators: ValidatorFn[];
}

export interface ModelGroup<T> {
   name: string;
   // Any subgroups of the group
   groups?: ModelGroup<any>[];
   // Any form controls of the group
   controls?: ModelControl<any>[];
}

and since we've done that, we can move the definitions of the individual form groups out of the single monolithic module and define the form group where we define the model. Much cleaner.

// personal_details.ts

export interface PersonalDetails {
  ...
}

export const personalDetailsFormGroup: ModelGroup<PersonalDetails> = {
   name: 'personalDetails$';
   groups: [...]
}

But now we have all these individual form group definitions scattered throughout our modules and no way to collect them all :( We need some way to know all the form groups in our application.

But we don't know how many modules we'll have in future, and we might want to lazy load them, so their model groups might not be registered at application start.

Inversion of control to the rescue! Let's make a service, with a single injected dependency -- a multi-provider which can be injected with all our scattered form groups when we distribute them throughout our modules.

export const MODEL_GROUP = new OpaqueToken('my_model_group');

/**
 * All the form controls for the application
 */
export class FormControlService {
    constructor(
        @Inject(MMODEL_GROUP) rootControls: ModelGroup<any>[]
    ) {}

    getControl(name: string): AbstractControl { /etc. }
}

then create a manifest module somewhere (which is injected into the "core" app module), building your FormService

@NgModule({
   providers : [
     {provide: MODEL_GROUP, useValue: personalDetailsFormGroup, multi: true}
     // and all your other form groups
     // finally inject our service, which knows about all the form controls
     // our app will ever use.
     FormControlService
   ]
})
export class CoreFormControlsModule {}

We've now got a solution which is:

  • more local, the form controls are declared alongside the models
  • more scalable, just need to add a form control and then add it to the manifest module; and
  • less monolithic, no "god" config classes.
  • Thanks @ovangle! I think your suggestions are very close to what I'm trying to achieve, and provided enough food for thought. – Manolis Dec 5 '16 at 9:45

I did a similar application. The problem is that you are creating all your inputs at the same time, which is not likely scalable.

In my case, I did a FormManagerService who manages an array of FormGroup. Each step has a FormGroup that is initialized once in the execution on the ngOnInit of the step component by sending his FormGroup config to the FormManagerService. Something like that:

stepsForm: Array<FormGroup> = [];
getFormGroup(id:number, config: Object): FormGroup {
    let formGroup: FormGroup;
    if(this.stepsForm[id]){
        formGroup = this.stepsForm[id];
    } else {
        formGroup = this.createForm(config); // call function to create FormGroup
        this.stepsForm[id] = formGroup;
    }
    return formGroup;
}

You'll need an id to know which FormGroup corresponds to the step. But after that, you'll be able to split your Forms config in each step (so small config files that are easier for maintenance than a huge file). It will minimize the initial load time since the FormGroups are only create when needed.

Finally before submitting, you just need to map your FormGroup array and validate if they're all valid. Just make sure all the steps has been visited (otherwise some FormGroup won't be created).

This may not be the best solution but it was a good fit in my project since I'm forcing the user to follow my steps. Give me your feedback. :)

Is it really necessary to keep the form controls in the service? Why not just leave the service as the keeper of data, and have the form controls in the components? You could use the CanDeactivate guard to prevent the user from navigating away from a component with invalid data.

https://angular.io/docs/ts/latest/api/router/index/CanDeactivate-interface.html

  • Thing is, we don't want to prevent the users from navigating away from the component, even if there is invalid data. The point of the Summary page is to prevent them submitting the application unless all the data is valid, but not before that. In the beginning we had the form controls in their components, and a service for all the http requests. But as the application grew bigger, that quickly became non-DRY. I guess my question is, how can we achieve application-wide form-state awareness of each control the best way possible, given the huge amount of form controls that we'll have. – Manolis Nov 28 '16 at 22:30
  • 1
    I think @ngrx/store in combination with @ngrx/effects is what you're looking for to solve your problems. It's designed to solve your exact use case, keeping track of all the state in your application as a discrete bundle that you pass around between components. – ovangle Dec 3 '16 at 6:04
  • The application store will allow you to track all the information the user has provided in any of your forms, regardless of validity, and the effects module for the store will let you set up gate on the validity of any subset of the data before you submit the entire completed form state. – ovangle Dec 3 '16 at 6:12

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