30

I have a simple concurrency use case in go, and it's driving me nuts I can't figure out an elegant solution. Any help would be appreciated.

I want to write a method fetchAll that queries an unspecified number of resources from remote servers in parallel. If any of the fetches fails, I want to return that first error immediately.

My initial, naive implementation, leaks goroutines:

package main

import (
  "fmt"
  "math/rand"
  "sync"
  "time"
)

func fetchAll() error {
  wg := sync.WaitGroup{}
  errs := make(chan error)
  leaks := make(map[int]struct{})
  defer fmt.Println("these goroutines leaked:", leaks)

  // run all the http requests in parallel
  for i := 0; i < 4; i++ {
    leaks[i] = struct{}{}
    wg.Add(1)
    go func(i int) {
      defer wg.Done()
      defer delete(leaks, i)

      // pretend this does an http request and returns an error
      time.Sleep(time.Duration(rand.Intn(100)) * time.Millisecond)
      errs <- fmt.Errorf("goroutine %d's error returned", i)
    }(i)
  }

  // wait until all the fetches are done and close the error
  // channel so the loop below terminates
  go func() {
    wg.Wait()
    close(errs)
  }()

  // return the first error
  for err := range errs {
    if err != nil {
      return err
    }
  }

  return nil
}

func main() {
  fmt.Println(fetchAll())
}

Playground: https://play.golang.org/p/Be93J514R5

I know from reading https://blog.golang.org/pipelines that I can create a signal channel to cleanup the other threads. Alternatively, I could probably use context to accomplish it. But it seems like such a simple use case should have a simpler solution that I'm missing.

21

All but one of your goroutines are leaked, because they're still waiting to send to the errs channel - you never finish the for-range that empties it. You're also leaking the goroutine who's job is to close the errs channel, because the waitgroup is never finished.

(Also, as Andy pointed out, deleting from map is not thread-safe, so that'd need protection from a mutex.)

However, I don't think maps, mutexes, waitgroups, contexts etc. are even necessary here. I'd rewrite the whole thing to just use basic channel operations, something like the following:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "math/rand"
    "time"
)

func fetchAll() error {
    var N = 4
    quit := make(chan bool)
    errc := make(chan error)
    done := make(chan error)
    for i := 0; i < N; i++ {
        go func(i int) {
            // dummy fetch
            time.Sleep(time.Duration(rand.Intn(100)) * time.Millisecond)
            err := error(nil)
            if rand.Intn(2) == 0 {
                err = fmt.Errorf("goroutine %d's error returned", i)
            }
            ch := done // we'll send to done if nil error and to errc otherwise
            if err != nil {
                ch = errc
            }
            select {
            case ch <- err:
                return
            case <-quit:
                return
            }
        }(i)
    }
    count := 0
    for {
        select {
        case err := <-errc:
            close(quit)
            return err
        case <-done:
            count++
            if count == N {
                return nil // got all N signals, so there was no error
            }
        }
    }
}

func main() {
    rand.Seed(time.Now().UnixNano())
    fmt.Println(fetchAll())
}

Playground link: https://play.golang.org/p/mxGhSYYkOb

EDIT: There indeed was a silly mistake, thanks for pointing it out. I fixed the code above (I think...). I also added some randomness for added Realism™.

Also, I'd like to stress that there really are multiple ways to approach this problem, and my solution is but one way. Ultimately it comes down to personal taste, but in general, you want to strive towards "idiomatic" code - and towards a style that feels natural and easy to understand for you.

5
  • the ec := chan error(nil) is interesting, i haven't seen this pattern before. I thought select causes were executed in random order. Is there a race condition where done<-true gets sent before ec<-err? – gerad Nov 29 '16 at 18:10
  • Good catch, there absolutely is a race! I wrote that in a hurry and like I mentioned, didn't test it (which you should always do). Luckily fixing the mistake only makes the entire code even simpler, and in this case, there's no need for the chan error(nil) trick (which is useful sometimes when you want to block out a send from a select statement so you don't have to write multiple conditional selects). Thanks for pointing out my mistake :) – LemurFromTheId Nov 30 '16 at 5:17
  • This can be simplified further. You don't need separate done and error channels and there's a few other things than be improved. play.golang.org/p/1a0ZXuy3Dz – Menno Smits Sep 5 '17 at 3:14
  • @MennoSmits Your simplification is interesting, and in fact I'm wondering why we'd even need the quit channel and the select statement anymore? play.golang.org/p/PmovudTviF – cjauvin Nov 7 '17 at 16:12
  • The quit channel is necessary to stop all goroutines as soon as one of them fails. The OP's problem statement hinted at that. If it's OK that the other goroutines continue when one has failed then your solution is spot on. – Menno Smits Nov 9 '17 at 20:22
48

Using Error Group makes this even simpler. This automatically waits for all the supplied Go Routines to complete successfully, or cancels all those remaining in the case of any one routine returning an error (in which case that error is the one bubble back up to the caller).

package main

import (
        "context"
        "fmt"
        "math/rand"
        "time"

        "golang.org/x/sync/errgroup"
)

func fetchAll(ctx context.Context) error {
        errs, ctx := errgroup.WithContext(ctx)

        // run all the http requests in parallel
        for i := 0; i < 4; i++ {
                errs.Go(func() error {
                        // pretend this does an http request and returns an error                                                  
                        time.Sleep(time.Duration(rand.Intn(100)) * time.Millisecond)                                               
                        return fmt.Errorf("error in go routine, bailing")                                                      
                })
        }

        // Wait for completion and return the first error (if any)                                                                 
        return errs.Wait()
}

func main() {
        fmt.Println(fetchAll(context.Background()))
}
3
  • 4
    +1, this is brilliant. So clean and idiomatic. A small addendum though - the "remaining" goroutines are untouched by the errgroup. Errgroup just normally waits for their completion. For a fail-fast, each goroutine should have the same ctx and actively pay attention to ctx.Done. In other words, the verb 'cancel' in Go lingo doesn't mean 'kill the goroutine'. – kubanczyk Dec 21 '19 at 22:25
  • however we are not able to pass aruments to errs.Go – Luna Lovegood Mar 26 '20 at 4:46
  • @here, will there be any go routines leak, if there was a case like fetchAll() got returned before reaching return errs.Wait() - (it's a bad practise though) – chinmayan Aug 19 '20 at 16:05
5

Here's a more complete example using errgroup suggested by joth. It shows processing successful data, and will exit on the first error.

https://play.golang.org/p/rU1v-Mp2ijo

package main

import (
    "context"
    "fmt"
    "golang.org/x/sync/errgroup"
    "math/rand"
    "time"
)

func fetchAll() error {
    g, ctx := errgroup.WithContext(context.Background())
    results := make(chan int)
    for i := 0; i < 4; i++ {
        current := i
        g.Go(func() error {
            // Simulate delay with random errors.
            time.Sleep(time.Duration(rand.Intn(100)) * time.Millisecond)
            if rand.Intn(2) == 0 {
                return fmt.Errorf("goroutine %d's error returned", current)
            }
            // Pass processed data to channel, or receive a context completion.
            select {
            case results <- current:
                return nil
            // Close out if another error occurs.
            case <-ctx.Done():
                return ctx.Err()
            }
        })
    }

    // Elegant way to close out the channel when the first error occurs or
    // when processing is successful.
    go func() {
        g.Wait()
        close(results)
    }()

    for result := range results {
        fmt.Println("processed", result)
    }

    // Wait for all fetches to complete.
    return g.Wait()
}

func main() {
    fmt.Println(fetchAll())
}

1
  • 1
    That "elegant way" comment somehow made me nearly sure that extra goroutine is a race. Now I interpret it as just a small additional producer which only closes the door. This straightens out my intuition. As always, the producer closes and not the consumer. – kubanczyk Dec 21 '19 at 23:22
2

As long as each goroutine completes, you won't leak anything. You should create the error channel as buffered with the buffer size equal to the number of goroutines so that the send operations on the channel won't block. Each goroutine should always send something on the channel when it finishes, whether it succeeds or fails. The loop at the bottom can then just iterate for the number of goroutines and return if it gets a non-nil error. You don't need the WaitGroup or the other goroutine that closes the channel.

I think the reason it appears that goroutines are leaking is that you return when you get the first error, so some of them are still running.

By the way, maps are not goroutine safe. If you share a map among goroutines and some of them are making changes to the map, you need to protect it with a mutex.

1
  • I agree that using a buffered channel would work, I was trying to avoid that solution though the number of fetches isn't easily known in advance (the actual code is more complex than the example). – gerad Nov 29 '16 at 17:56
-1

This answer includes the ability to get the responses back into doneData -

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "math/rand"
    "os"
    "strconv"
)

var doneData []string // responses

func fetchAll(n int, doneCh chan bool, errCh chan error) {
    partialDoneCh := make(chan string)

    for i := 0; i < n; i++ {
        go func(i int) {

            if r := rand.Intn(100); r != 0 && r%10 == 0 {
                // simulate an error
                errCh <- fmt.Errorf("e33or for reqno=" + strconv.Itoa(r))
            } else {
                partialDoneCh <- strconv.Itoa(i)
            }
        }(i)
    }

    // mutation of doneData
    for d := range partialDoneCh {
        doneData = append(doneData, d)
        if len(doneData) == n {
            close(partialDoneCh)
            doneCh <- true
        }
    }
}

func main() {
    // rand.Seed(1)
    var n int
    var e error
    if len(os.Args) > 1 {
        if n, e = strconv.Atoi(os.Args[1]); e != nil {
            panic(e)
        }
    } else {
        n = 5
    }

    doneCh := make(chan bool)
    errCh := make(chan error)

    go fetchAll(n, doneCh, errCh)
    fmt.Println("main: end")

    select {
    case <-doneCh:
        fmt.Println("success:", doneData)
    case e := <-errCh:
        fmt.Println("failure:", e, doneData)
    }
}

Execute using go run filename.go 50 where N=50 i.e amount of parallelism

3
  • this is not diomatic. This is not a right answer, it works that is not the problem, it does not take advantage of dioms provided by the language to write the solution, and that is not in line with the OP. furthermore it is convoluted, at least, doneDaa is useless and doneCh is totally optional using the approprate idiom. – mh-cbon May 3 at 6:58
  • @mh-cbon Would be helpful if you provided specific corrections. – human May 3 at 10:09

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.