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What is the purpose of padding in base64 encoding. The following is the extract from wikipedia:

"An additional pad character is allocated which may be used to force the encoded output into an integer multiple of 4 characters (or equivalently when the unencoded binary text is not a multiple of 3 bytes) ; these padding characters must then be discarded when decoding but still allow the calculation of the effective length of the unencoded text, when its input binary length would not be not a multiple of 3 bytes (the last non-pad character is normally encoded so that the last 6-bit block it represents will be zero-padded on its least significant bits, at most two pad characters may occur at the end of the encoded stream)."

I wrote a program which could base64 encode any string and decode any base64 encoded string. What problem does padding solves?

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Your conclusion that padding is unnecessary is right. It's always possible to determine the length of the input unambiguously from the length of the encoded sequence.

However, padding is useful in situations where base64 encoded strings are concatenated in such a way that the lengths of the individual sequences are lost, as might happen, for example, in a very simple network protocol.

If unpadded strings are concatenated, it's impossible to recover the original data because information about the number of odd bytes at the end of each individual sequence is lost. However, if padded sequences are used, there's no ambiguity, and the sequence as a whole can be decoded correctly.

Edit: An Illustration

Suppose we have a program that base64-encodes words, concatenates them and sends them over a network. It encodes "I", "AM" and "TJM", sandwiches the results together without padding and transmits them.

  • I encodes to SQ (SQ== with padding)
  • AM encodes to QU0 (QU0= with padding)
  • TJM encodes to VEpN (VEpN with padding)

So the transmitted data is SQQU0VEpN. The receiver base64-decodes this as I\x04\x14\xd1Q) instead of the intended IAMTJM. The result is nonsense because the sender has destroyed information about where each word ends in the encoded sequence. If the sender had sent SQ==QU0=VEpN instead, the receiver could have decoded this as three separate base64 sequences which would concatenate to give IAMTJM.

Why Bother with Padding?

Why not just design the protocol to prefix each word with an integer length? Then the receiver could decode the stream correctly and there would be no need for padding.

That's a great idea, as long as we know the length of the data we're encoding before we start encoding it. But what if, instead of words, we were encoding chunks of video from a live camera? We might not know the length of each chunk in advance.

If the protocol used padding, there would be no need to transmit a length at all. The data could be encoded as it came in from the camera, each chunk terminated with padding, and the receiver would be able to decode the stream correctly.

Obviously that's a very contrived example, but perhaps it illustrates why padding might conceivably be helpful in some situations.

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    +1 The only answer that actually provides a reasonable answer besides "because we like verbosity and redundancy for some inexplicable reason". – Invalid Jul 31 '15 at 0:27
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    This works OK for chunks that are encoded distinctly, but are expected to be indivisibly concatenated after decoding. If you send U0FNSQ==QU0=, you can reconstruct the sentence, but you lose the words that make up the sentence. Better than nothing, I guess. Notably, the GNU base64 program automatically handles concatenated encodings. – Marcelo Cantos Mar 25 '16 at 4:17
  • What if the length of words was a multiple of 3? This dumb way of concatenation destroys information (endings of words), not the removal of padding. – GreenScape Sep 9 '16 at 8:02
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    I'm torn between upvoting and not wanting to ruin that beautiful "42" number.. – redShadow Dec 21 '16 at 13:11
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    Base64 concatenation allows encoders to process large chunks in parallel without the burden of aligning the chunk sizes to a multiple of three. Similarly, as an implementation detail, there might be an encoder out there that needs to flush an internal data buffer of a size that is not a multiple of three. – Andre D Sep 5 '17 at 6:22
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What are Padding Characters?

Padding characters help satisfy length requirements and carry no meaning.

Decimal Example of Padding: Given the arbitrary requirement all strings be 8 characters in length, the number 640 can meet this requirement using preceding 0's as padding characters as they carry no meaning, "00000640".

Binary Encoding

The Byte Paradigm: The byte is the de facto standard unit of measurement and any encoding scheme must relate back to bytes.

Base256 fits exactly into this paradigm. One byte is equal to one character in base256.

Base16, hexadecimal or hex, uses 4 bits for each character. One byte can represent two base16 characters.

Base64 does not fit evenly into the byte paradigm, unlike base256 and base16. All base64 characters can be represented in 6 bits, 2 bits short of a full byte.

We can represent base64 encoding versus the byte paradigm as a fraction: 6 bits per character over 8 bits per byte. Reduced this fraction is 3 bytes over 4 characters.

This ratio, 3 bytes for every 4 base64 characters, is the rule we want to follow when encoding base64. Base64 encoding can only promise even measuring with 3 byte bundles, unlike base16 and base256 where every byte can stand on it's own.

So why is padding encouraged even though encoding could work just fine without the padding characters? The padding characters communicate explicitly that those extra spots should be empty and rules out any ambiguity or potentially nasty bugs. Padding allows us to decode base64 encoding with the promise of no lost bits. Without padding there is no longer the explicit acknowledgement of measuring in three byte bundles and we can no longer guarantee exact reproduction of original encoding without additional information.

Examples

Here is the example form RFC 4648 (http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4648#section-8)

Each character inside the "BASE64" function uses one byte (base256). We then translate that to base64.

BASE64("")       = ""           (No bytes used. 0%3=0.)
BASE64("f")      = "Zg=="       (One byte used. 1%3=1.)
BASE64("fo")     = "Zm8="       (Two bytes. 2%3=2.)
BASE64("foo")    = "Zm9v"       (Three bytes. 3%3=0.)
BASE64("foob")   = "Zm9vYg=="   (Four bytes. 4%3=1.)
BASE64("fooba")  = "Zm9vYmE="   (Five bytes. 5%3=2.)
BASE64("foobar") = "Zm9vYmFy"   (Six bytes. 6%3=0.)

Here's an encoder that you can play around with: http://www.motobit.com/util/base64-decoder-encoder.asp

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    -1 It's a nice and thorough post on how number systems work, but it doesn't explain why padding is used when the encoding would work perfectly without. – Matti Virkkunen Nov 11 '14 at 20:09
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    Did you even read the question? You don't need padding to decode correctly. – Navin Dec 10 '15 at 21:02
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    I think this answer did in fact explain the reason as stated here: "we can no longer guarantee exact reproduction of original encoding without additional information". It's simple really, the padding let us know that we received the complete encoding. Every time you have 3 bytes, you can safely assume it's ok to go ahead and decode it, you don't worry that, hum... maybe one more byte is going to come possibly changing the encoding. – Didier A. Jan 12 '16 at 3:56
  • @DidierA. How do you know that there isn't 3 more bytes in a base64 substring? To decode a char*, you need either the size of the string or a null terminator. Padding is redundant. Hence, OP's question. – Navin Mar 10 '16 at 11:59
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    @Navin If you are stream decoding the base64 bytes, you do not know the length, with the 3 bytes padding, you know that every time you got 3 bytes you can process the 4 characters, until you reach the end of the stream. Without it, you might need to backtrack, because the next byte could cause the previous character to change, therefore making it that you can only be sure you decoded it properly once you've reached the end of the stream. So, it's not very useful, but it has a few edge cases where you might want it on. – Didier A. Mar 10 '16 at 18:48
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This is only a theory of mine, and I cannot provide any sources, but I think the padding character(s) only serve to make some implementations of the decoding algorithm a tiniest bit simpler. In particular, if the algorithm puts the encoded string into something like int[] then the final value will sometimes be too long.

If the padding is already present in the input then nothing else needs to be done - the algorithm can just read and decode the input.

If the algorithm is not allowed to assume the padding to be present, however, and it uses int[]-like datastructure, then it needs to manually pad the final integer before decoding, or do some extra bookkeeping on the input's original length.

I personally don't think the padding serves any purpose whatsoever anymore, but back when CPU and RAM were not quite as abundant as now this slight optimization may have mattered. I doubt it mattered that much though... a good implementation would still need to do something sensible when fed input that was truncated randomly, and that, IMO, would give the ability to process unpadded inputs at no extra cost.

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    In the absence of padding, an attempt to concatenate two strings when the first string's length is not a multiple of three would often yield a seemingly-valid string, but the contents of the second string would decode incorrectly. Adding the padding ensures that does not occur. – supercat Sep 12 '16 at 22:05
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    @supercat If that were the goal, wouldn't it be easier to end every base64 string with just a single "="? The average length would be shorter, and it would still prevent erroneous concatenations. – Roman Starkov Sep 12 '16 at 22:32
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    The average length of b'Zm9vYmFyZm9vYg==' b'Zm9vYmFyZm9vYmE=' b'Zm9vYmFyZm9vYmFy' b'Zm9vYmFyZm9vYmFyZg==' b'Zm9vYmFyZm9vYmFyZm8=' b'Zm9vYmFyZm9vYmFyZm9v' is the same as that of b'Zm9vYmFyZm9vYg=' b'Zm9vYmFyZm9vYmE=' b'Zm9vYmFyZm9vYmFy=' b'Zm9vYmFyZm9vYmFyZg=' b'Zm9vYmFyZm9vYmFyZm8=' b'Zm9vYmFyZm9vYmFyZm9v=' – Scott Jun 19 '18 at 16:06

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