1

This question already has an answer here:

I’m working on some code that should run under both Python 2.7.x and Python 3.3+ unchanged, and uses Unicode data text file I/O.

So which is better—and why?

Variant 1:

import io
encoding = 'utf-8'

with io.open('Unicode.txt', 'w', encoding=encoding) as f:
    …
with io.open('Unicode.txt', 'r', encoding=encoding) as f:
    …

Variant 2:

from io import open
encoding = 'utf-8'

with open('Unicode.txt', 'w', encoding=encoding) as f:
    …
with open('Unicode.txt', 'r', encoding=encoding) as f:
    …

Personally, I’d tend to use Variant 2, because the code should be as Python-3-ish as possible, just providing backport stubs for Python 2.7.x. It also looks cleaner and I wouldn’t have to change existing code much. Also I think maybe I could save a little by not importing the whole io module.

marked as duplicate by Jim Fasarakis Hilliard, Martijn Pieters python Nov 25 '16 at 17:23

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 2
    You always import a whole module. The only difference this makes is what name is bound in your current module globals (so either io is bound, or open is bound). – Martijn Pieters Nov 25 '16 at 17:23
  • Didn’t know that, thanks for the explanation, Martijn! – Moonbase Nov 25 '16 at 17:35
  • 2
    @MartijnPieters this is not a duplicate of the other question. It's specific to 'open'. Using Variant 2 means that you can just delete the whole import line once Python 3 has been fully adopted. – Emil Dec 5 '17 at 20:43
1

Formally there is no better way, it is up to you, but I think it is good to use variant 1 since in case you will use another module that has a function called open(), the last import will override the former.

You are right that in general in Python 3 is very common to use from module import field, but I personally would use the first variant. In the end, if you are worried about typing more, a good editor or IDE would help you. :-)

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