9

I want to have a program where the user have 10 seconds to enter the password. If the timer goes over 10 seconds, the program displays a message. My current code is this:

 #include <iostream>
 #include <ctime>
 #include <string>

int main(){
std::string password;

int start_s=clock();

int stop_s=clock();
if(stop_s-start_s <= 0){

    std::cout << "TIME RAN OUT!";
}
std::cout << "Enter your password! \n";
std::cout << "Password: ";
std::cin >> password;
std::cout << "\n \n";

if (password == "password123"){

    std::cout << "Correct!";
} else {
    std::cout << "Wrong!";
}

}

This of course is not working... But I am not sure what to do next... Any ideas?

If you need more details, ask in the comments.

EDIT:

I just realized what the problem was... It took a time stamp and then quickly made another time stamp. And when the difference was found, it was below 0...

But I still don't know what to do next...

9
  • You'll probably need to use threads
    – ForceBru
    Nov 25, 2016 at 19:42
  • Is this Unix/Linux/POSIX? Or Windows? Or does it have to be standard C++?
    – hyde
    Nov 25, 2016 at 19:43
  • This may be of help: stackoverflow.com/questions/4511732/…
    – hyde
    Nov 25, 2016 at 19:46
  • @hyde That's C. I need C++.
    – BoeNoe
    Nov 25, 2016 at 19:46
  • 1
    no need for threads, after std::cout << "\n \n"; you could just check if the difference between start and current is greater 10 seconds...
    – ampawd
    Nov 25, 2016 at 19:47

3 Answers 3

12

What you are trying to do is to have an non-blocking (asynchronous) read from stdin with a timeout of 10 seconds. This is not too tough but may involve many new concepts depending on your current level.

The key concept here is that cin >> password; is a blocking call, i.e., until it is completed, control will not flow further in this code. So we need to make it non-blocking in some way, or keep it blocking and break out of it when the timeout expires.

There are a few common implementations based on the design requirements and constraints of the system. Each implementation is different depending on the OS but the techniques are very similar.

1. Asynchronous: STDIN with timeout This approach is commonly used in network programming and can be extended to other forms of input such as the current case.

  1. Place the standard input (STDIN) handle (handle = 0) into a 'watch-list'.
  2. Place a timeout on the watch-list.
  3. Whenever there is a change in the STDIN, process it.
  4. When the timeout has expired, check if what we have processed does the job.

In Linux (and many other Unix flavors), the watch-list can be handled using FD_SET and a select system call. In Windows, you will need to use WaitForMultipleEvents.

I'm not sure I can do justice to explaining these concepts accurately for the purposes of this question. As a reference, another question which has some code pointers for exactly the same thing is here.

2. Synchronous: Multithreaded with Interrupt This is a common technique used for cases where we need a fine-grained event-scheduler / timer.

  1. Create two threads, A and B.
  2. A will wait on the indicated timeout.
  3. B will wait on a blocking read
  4. If A terminates (times out) before B finishes, A signals B and B decides what to do next (terminate, repeat a message etc)
  5. If B reads the password and it's fine, B signals A and asks it to die.

Another way to achieve the same is to make the OS interrupt thread B as described in one of the comments.

3. Synchronous: Polling This is used for cases where we don't need too much of a fine-grained control over time.

  1. Check if there is anything in the input using a non-blocking read (kbhit())
  2. If there is none, and if there is time remaining in the timeout, wait for a smaller amount of time delta (say 10ms)
  3. If the timeout has expired and there is no more time remaining, do whatever processing is needed (message the user, exit etc)

Note that in this case, depending on the delta, the approach may consume a lot of CPU and may be inefficient. For example, if delta=10ms as above, the thread will be woken up 100 times every second and it will be not efficient, especially when users do not type characters on their keyboard that fast.

2
  • Another way is to make the OS interrupt the STDIN read after some time (a link in the comments under question). Doing that will be simpler than what is proposed in this answer, but of course much more limited too.
    – hyde
    Nov 25, 2016 at 20:50
  • Yes, or waiting for small amounts of time (10ms) and then polling. These again are decisions we consider depending on the system. I think I'll update the answer to include the other options. Nov 25, 2016 at 20:52
0

This code does it using thread.

#include <iostream>
#include <thread>
#include <chrono>
#include <string>

int main()
{
   std::string password;
   std::cout << "Enter your password! \n";
   std::cout << "Password: ";

   //try to read a passsword in 10 seconds
   std::thread t1([&]() {
       std::cin >> password;
       });
   std::this_thread::sleep_for(std::chrono::seconds(10));
   t1.detach();

   //check if password was entered
   if (password.empty())
       std::cout << "TIME IS OUT\n";
   else
       if (password == "password123")
           std::cout << "Correct";
       else
           std::cout << "Worng";

   return 0;
}

But if you check out you can see that it waits untill the end of the 10 seconds even if the user entered a passsword in time. So you can improve it this way:

#include <iostream>
#include <thread>
#include <chrono>
#include <string>

int main()
{
    std::string password;
    std::cout << "Enter your password! \n";
    std::cout << "Password: ";


    time_t start = time(NULL);
    time_t waitTime = 10;

    //try to read a passsword in 10 seconds
    while (time(NULL) < start + waitTime && password.empty())
    {
        std::thread t1([&]() {
            std::cin >> password;
            });
        std::this_thread::sleep_for(std::chrono::milliseconds(20));
        t1.detach();
    }
    
    

    //check if password was entered
    if (password.empty())
        std::cout << "\nTIME IS OUT\n";
    else
        if (password == "password123")
            std::cout << "Correct";
        else
            std::cout << "Worng";

    return 0;
}
-2

A canonical c++ solution should look like:

#include <iostream>
#include <chrono>
#include <string>

int main() {
     std::string password;

     std::cout << "Enter your password! \n";
     std::cout << "Password: ";
     auto start_s = std::chrono::system_clock::now();
     std::cin >> password;

     auto stop_s = std::chrono::system_clock::now();
     if(stop_s - start_s >= std::chrono::seconds(10)) {
        std::cout << "TIME RAN OUT!";
     }
     else if (password == "password123") {
            std::cout << "Correct!";
     } else {
         std::cout << "Wrong!";
     }

}
5
  • 3
    This will block on std::cin >> password; and the program may not terminate in the expected timeout. Nov 25, 2016 at 20:49
  • 1
    @Raindrop7 Sure one can move the blocking cin to a separate thread, and end (abort) the program after the time is expired. Nov 28, 2016 at 18:49
  • That will block the thread that runs the cin, but another thread can interrupt that blocked thread and make it do other things, or may even terminate the blocked thread gracefully. Nov 28, 2016 at 18:49
  • 1
    @user1952500 I read your comment, that's a poor man's solution yes. "or may even terminate the blocked thread gracefully." Not really. Nov 28, 2016 at 18:50
  • The OP said: "After 10 seconds the program displays a message". If the user never hits return with your code, it never reaches the timeout.
    – kfsone
    Sep 8, 2019 at 5:16

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