I'm playing around with writing generic makefiles for my project. What I want to be able to do is provide a list of objects, and have them all compiled automatically. Here is a simple makefile that does that:

OBJS=\
main.o \
more_stuff.o \
and_even_more_stuff.o \

all: $(OBJS)
   ld $(OBJS) -o some_library.so

%.o: %.c
    gcc $< -o $@

As you can see, all it does is go through all the objects, checks to see if the relevant source file exists, and then it compiles it.

This works, but once I try to put stuff In subdirectories, it works no longer:

OBJS=\
src/main.o \
src/foo/more_stuff.o \
src/bar/and_even_more_stuff.o \

all: $(OBJS)
   ld $(OBJS) -o some_library.so

# These targets no longer exist?
%.o: %.c
    gcc $< -o $@

In order to get this to work, I have to create a new target for every directory...

OBJS=\
src/main.o \
src/foo/more_stuff.o \
src/bar/and_even_more_stuff.o \

all: $(OBJS)
   ld $(OBJS) -o some_library.so

src/%.o: src/%.c
    gcc $< -o $@

src/foo/%.o: src/foo/%.c
    gcc $< -o $@

src/bar/%.o: src/bar/%.c:
    gcc %< -o $@

This works, but its ugly and annoying... how can I just define one target for all the objects (in every directory)?

Hope this made sense!

  • Your second makefile works for me (using GNU make 3.81). I can run e.g. make src/main.o and it's fine. What version of make are you using? – Ismail Badawi Nov 26 '16 at 0:28
  • Yes, the first one is supposed to work... Try the second one... – IHazza Nov 26 '16 at 0:30
  • Sorry, I did mean the second one. It works. – Ismail Badawi Nov 26 '16 at 0:31
  • Yes, but not when you run make all... I think – IHazza Nov 26 '16 at 0:32
  • 2
    You should (a) explain exactly what happens, with cut/paste of commands and errors: saying "it doesn't work" is useless to us, and (b) run make -d to see what make is trying to do, and (c) cut and paste the exact makefile you're testing with that doesn't work (if it's too big, create a minimal version that shows the problem). My suspicion is that what you've posted here is subtly different than what you're using but without knowing what actually doesn't work, there's no way to tell what that might be. – MadScientist Nov 26 '16 at 6:20

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