8

I have an ArrayList with duplicate string values and want to make the duplicates unique by appending a count.

public static void main(String[] args) {
    List<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();
    list.add("a");
    list.add("b");
    list.add("c");
    list.add("d");
    list.add("b");
    list.add("c");
    list.add("a");
    list.add("a");
    list.add("a");

    HashSet<String> set = new HashSet<String>();
    List<String> duplicateList = new ArrayList<String>();

    for (String item : list) {
        // If String is not in set, add it to the list and the set.
        if (!set.contains(item)) {              
            set.add(item);
        } else {
            duplicateList.add(item);
        }
    }

    for (String element : duplicateList) {
        System.out.println(element);
    }
}

Is there any way to make the list like:

a
b
c
d
b1
c1
a1
a2
a3
  • 2
    Why are you storing the data in an array list? This is the point to start in the first place. – Thomas Junk Nov 26 '16 at 8:51
  • @ThomasJunk. I want the list with duplicate values. Is there anyway? – user2196474 Nov 26 '16 at 9:13
10

Assuming that you use Java 8, if you want to get the total amount of duplicates of each value of your List, you could do that thanks to the Stream API by grouping by values then counting occurences of each value as next:

Map<String, Long> counter = list.stream()
    .collect(Collectors.groupingBy(Function.identity(), Collectors.counting()));
System.out.println(counter);

Output:

{a=4, b=2, c=2, d=1}

If you want to prevent duplicates by adding a counter at the end of the original String, you can use LinkedHashSet to preserve the values' ordering as proposed by Elliott Frisch.

A slightly different approach from Elliott Frisch's one:

List<String> list = Arrays.asList("a", "b", "c", "d", "b", "c", "a", "a", "a");
Set<String> set = new LinkedHashSet<>();
for (String str : list) {
    String value = str;
    // Iterate as long as you can't add the value indicating that we have
    // already the value in the set
    for (int i = 1; !set.add(value); i++) {
        value = str + i;
    }
}
System.out.println(set);

Output:

[a, b, c, d, b1, c1, a1, a2, a3]
9

It seems like you have the right idea. You just need to use a Map and actually count the encountered strings instead of just noting that they were encountered:

Map<String, Integer> counter = new HashMap<>();
List<String> duplicateList = new ArrayList<>();

for (String item : list) {

    // If String is not in set, add it to the list and the set, and 
    // note this is the first time it's encountered
    if (!counter.containsKey(item)) {
        duplicateList.add(item);
        counter.put(item, 1);
    } else {
        Integer count = counter.get(item);
        duplicateList.add(item + count);
        item.put(item, count + 1);
    }
}
4

You might use a LinkedHashSet, and you can use Arrays.asList(T...) to initialize your List. First, check if the set contains the element from the list. If it does, iterate values until you find one that does not already appear. Something like,

List<String> list = new ArrayList<>(Arrays.asList("a", "b", "c", "d", 
        "b", "c", "a", "a", "a"));
Set<String> mySet = new LinkedHashSet<>();
for (String str : list) {
    if (mySet.contains(str)) {
        int i = 1;
        while (mySet.contains(str + i)) {
            i++;
        }
        str = str + i;
    }
    mySet.add(str);
}
System.out.println(mySet);

Which outputs (as requested)

[a, b, c, d, b1, c1, a1, a2, a3]
  • @NicolasFilotto That List isn't mutable. Not certain if it matters in OP's case. – Elliott Frisch Nov 26 '16 at 10:25

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.