3

I am not super familiar with numpy but I am using it to calculate a confusion matrix at which it is fantastic other than the fact that it doesn't print the labels on the x and y axis. since my data labels aren't always the same it is a pain to go back and check in which order they were given. Right now I am using:

Right now I am using:

true_val = [int(i) for i in y]
predict_val = [int(i) for i in y_pred]
confusion = confusion_matrix(true_val, predict_val)
np.savetxt('confusion_matrix.txt', confusion, delimiter=',')

Right now I get a matrix like this:

[[0 2]
[0 2]]

but say my labels are named "1" and "3"

I would like to get:

   1  3
1  0  2
3  0  2

Is there any library that would do something like this or do I need to do it by hand in the array

1

Pandas does the job !

import pandas as pd

d = {'1' : pd.Series([0,0], index=[1,3]),
     '3' : pd.Series([2,2], index=[1,3])}
df = pd.DataFrame(d)
print(df)
  • thank you. But I still need to manually put in each of my labels and the series associated with them. I wanted to use the confusion matrix calculated and print it neatly to a file with the labels and the ability use use the code with different datasets which would have different labels and data. – badner Nov 27 '16 at 22:29
  • print(pd.DataFrame(yourArray, index = ["1", "3"], names = ["1","3"]) ) – Mohamed AL ANI Nov 27 '16 at 22:52
  • print(pd.DataFrame(confusion_matrix, index = true_val, names = true_val) ) TypeError: __init__() got an unexpected keyword argument 'names' – badner Nov 27 '16 at 23:19
  • typo correct: print(pd.DataFrame(confusion, index = true_val, names = true_val) ) TypeError: __init__() got an unexpected keyword argument 'names' – badner Nov 27 '16 at 23:57

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