5

Suppose we have a string str. If str contains only one character, for example, str = "1", then str[-1..1] returns 1.
But if the size (length) of str is longer than one, like str = "anything else", then str[-1..1] returns "" (empty string).

Why does Ruby interpret string slicing like this?

3
  • my ruby version is ruby 2.3.0p0 (2015-12-25 revision 53290) [x86_64-darwin15]
    – YaphetS_Bo
    Nov 28 '16 at 1:43
  • 2
    If you wish to elaborate, please edit the question rather than using comments. "Ruby v2.3" is sufficient. Nov 28 '16 at 2:03
  • As you say, "a"[-1..1] #=> "a" and "abf"[-1..1] => "", but in addition, "ab"[-1..1] => "b". Nov 28 '16 at 2:26
6

This behaviour is just how ranges of characters work.

The range start is -1, which is the last character in the string. The range end is 1, which is the second position from the start.

So for a one character string, this is equivalent to 0..1, which is that single character.

For a two character string, this is 1..1, which is the second character.

For a three character string, this is 2..1, which is an empty string. And so on for longer strings.

1
  • Very good. If anyone is wondering about one character strings, "a"[0..999] #=> "a". Nov 28 '16 at 3:24
3

To get a non-trivial substring, the start position has to represent a position earlier than the end position.

For a single-length string, index -1 is the same as index 0, which is smaller than 1. Thus, [-1..1] gives a non-trivial substring.

For a string longer than a single character, index -1 is larger than index 0. Thus, [-1..1] cannot give a non-trivial substring, and by default, it returns an empty string.

1

Writing down the indices usually helps me:

#      0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10  11  12
str = 'a' 'n' 'y' 't' 'h' 'i' 'n' 'g' ' ' 'e' 'l' 's' 'e' #=> "anything else"
#     -13 -12 -11 -10 -9  -8  -7  -6  -5  -4  -3  -2  -1

You can refer to each character by either its positive or negative index. For example, you can use either 3 or -10 to refer to "t":

str[3]   #=> "t"
str[-10] #=> "t"

and either 7 or -6 to refer to "g":

str[7]  #=> "g"
str[-6] #=> "g"

Likewise, you can use each of these indices to retrieve "thing" via a range:

str[3..7]    #=> "thing"
str[3..-6]   #=> "thing"
str[-10..7]  #=> "thing"
str[-10..-6] #=> "thing"

str[-1..1] however would return an empty string, because -1 refers to the last character and 1 refers to the second. It would be equivalent to str[12..1].

But if the string consists of a single character, that range becomes valid:

#      0
str = '1'
#     -1

str[-1..1] #=> "1"

In fact, 1 refers to an index after the first character, so 0 would be enough:

str[-1..0] #=> "1"

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.