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Is there a way without using logic and bitwise operators, just arithmetic operators, to flip between integers with the value 0 and 1?

ie. variable ?= variable will make the variable 1 if it 0 or 0 if it is 1.

2
  • Note that in JavaScript, many of the answers below evaluate to a boolean, not a number. For example: !x, (x <= 0), (x == 0), etc. Dec 11, 2015 at 3:07
  • Since the OP's need is often named "toggle" and described as "alternating", I'm mentioning these terms here. Ideally the mention will help people find this thread. These terms--and others that people think of--may be worth adding elsewhere in the thread to help search engines index the information.
    – Kay V
    Jun 14, 2021 at 16:44

11 Answers 11

267
x = 1 - x

Will switch between 0 and 1.

2
  • 2
    To apply this more broadly, if x is in a specific range of positive numbers, then you can also use this to reverse its value (ie. 7-x = 0/7, 1/6, 2/5, 3/4).
    – Pluto
    Mar 30, 2017 at 22:43
  • 1
    Its sad my brain could not come up with this by itself ..
    – Benjamin
    Jan 11 at 17:52
31

Edit: I misread the question, thought the OP could use any operator

A Few more...(ignore these)

x ^= 1       // bitwise operator
x = !x       // logical operator
x = (x <= 0) // kinda the same as x != 1

Without using an operator?

int arr[] = {1,0}
x = arr[x]
3
  • ^ is a bitwise operator and ! is a logical operator.
    – MAK
    Nov 3, 2010 at 20:04
  • While your second idea works, x = 1 - x is a much better solution. Having an array is overkill/wasteful.
    – Khalos
    Nov 4, 2010 at 4:33
  • x = !x is a good solution because it copes with values that aren't zero or one. Oct 28, 2015 at 9:23
21

Yet another way:

x = (x + 1) % 2
4
  • 5
    +1 because this will always give you 0 or 1 even if you accidentally give an integer outside that range.
    – Nick Forge
    Nov 4, 2010 at 4:30
  • @NickForge Cosidering that input other that 1 or 0 is illegal in scope of this question, are you sure that it is good that it won't protest on it?
    – Alex
    Dec 23, 2015 at 16:13
  • 1
    @Alex whether or not that's a good thing depends on the language and expectations of "defensiveness". In C for example, booleans are stored as integers with more than 1 bit, so the concept of "illegal" is somewhat fuzzy.
    – Nick Forge
    Dec 29, 2015 at 5:43
  • 1
    Bingo! I wanted to perform an integer-based "XOR", and this does exactly that: x = (A + B) % 2 if A and B are both 0 or 1. Thanks!
    – noio
    Feb 26, 2018 at 10:58
20

Assuming that it is initialized as a 0 or 1:

x = 1 - x
6

Comedy variation on st0le's second method

x = "\1"[x]
2
  • heh, love the non-obvious solutions.
    – Hamish
    Nov 7, 2010 at 22:46
  • 2
    And if you like that, you'll love x = x["\1"]; (C and C++). Nov 8, 2010 at 22:03
6

Another way to flip a bit.

x = ABS(x - 1) // the absolute of (x - 1)
4
int flip(int i){
    return 1 - i;
};
4

Just for a bit of variety:

x = 1 / (x + 1);

x = (x == 0);

x = (x != 1);

Not sure whether you consider == and != to be arithmetic operators. Probably not, and obviously although they work in C, more strongly typed languages wouldn't convert the result to integer.

4

you can simply try this

+(!0) // output:1

+(!1) // output:0
1
  • This is highly language dependent though.
    – L. Dai
    May 4, 2020 at 16:54
-1

You can use simple: abs(x-1) or just: int(not x)

-1

yet another variation of may others that I was surprised wasn't here - (x-1)*-1

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