#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>  

int main()

{
    const char *chess[8][8]; //using 2 dimensional array 

    chess[0][0] = "X";
    chess[0][2] = "X";
    chess[0][4] = "X";   //writing values step by step
    chess[0][6] = "X";


    chess[1][1] = "X";
    chess[1][3] = "X"; //same
    chess[1][5] = "X";
    chess[1][7] = "X";

    chess[2][0] = "X";
    chess[2][2] = "X";// same
    chess[2][4] = "X";
    chess[2][6] = "X";

    chess[3][1] = "X";
    chess[3][3] = "X";
    chess[3][5] = "X";
    chess[3][7] = "X";

    chess[4][0] = "X";
    chess[4][2] = "X";
    chess[4][4] = "X";  // same
    chess[4][6] = "X";

    chess[5][1] = "X";
    chess[5][3] = "X";
    chess[5][5] = "X";  // same
    chess[5][7] = "X";

    chess[6][0] = "X";
    chess[6][2] = "X";
    chess[6][4] = "X";  //same
    chess[6][6] = "X";

    chess[7][1] = "X";
    chess[7][3] = "X";  //same
    chess[7][5] = "X";
    chess[7][7] = "X";

    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < 8; i++) //printing out array
    {
        int j;
        for (j = 0; j < 8; j++)
            printf("%c",  &chess[i][j]); //same
    }
    printf("\n");
    system("pause");  //same
    return 0;  


}
  • You have two problems. You're using the wrong format specifier (change the printf statement to printf("%s", chess[i][j]);). Also, you're accessing uninitialized values. Initialize the entire 2-D array to " " and then change the specified values to "X". Also, you want printf("\n"); after the inner for loop. – Eli Sadoff Nov 28 '16 at 18:09
  • What's the question? Try to add 'printf("\n");' at the end of outer loop. – leggo Nov 28 '16 at 18:13
  • After using %s i get ·O╠╠╠╠0{╠╠╠╠0{╠╠╠╠0{0{╠╠╠╠0{╠╠╠╠0{╠╠╠╠0{╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠0{╠╠╠╠0{╠╠╠╠0{╠╠╠╠0{0{╠╠╠╠0{╠╠╠╠0{╠╠╠╠0{╠╠╠╠╠╠╠╠0{ – Batuhan Göbekli Nov 28 '16 at 18:28
  • @BatuhanGöbekli - yes, because your current code access memory not assigned to you. In other words - your code have undefined behavior – 4386427 Nov 28 '16 at 18:32
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I can spot five problems:

1) Wrong type:

This

const char *chess[8][8]; 

is 64 char-pointers but you probably want 64 chars, like

const char chess[8][8]; 

2) Initializing with string instead of char

Here

chess[0][0] = "X";

you use string for initialization but probably want a char, like

chess[0][0] = 'X'; // single ' instead of double "

3) You don't initialize the full array

Some of the array elements, e.g. [0][1], are uninitialized. So when you print them in the loop, you read the uninitialized value.

See the end of this answer for a more compact way of initializing the board.

4) Wrong argument for printing

Here

printf("%c",  &chess[i][j]);

you take the address of the char. That is wrong - simply do:

printf("%c",  chess[i][j]);

5) Use of const for a non-const variable

Here

const char *chess[8][8];

you say that chess is a constant. Then you can't change it later on. Instead you want

char *chess[8][8];

So putting it all together would be:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>  

int main()

{
    char chess[8][8]; //using 2 dimensional array 

    for(int g=0; g<8; ++g)
        for (int t=0; t<8; ++t)
            chess[g][t] = 'Z';

    chess[0][0] = 'X';
    chess[0][2] = 'X';
    chess[0][4] = 'X';   //writing values step by step
    chess[0][6] = 'X';


    chess[1][1] = 'X';
    chess[1][3] = 'X'; //same
    chess[1][5] = 'X';
    chess[1][7] = 'X';

    chess[2][0] = 'X';
    chess[2][2] = 'X';// same
    chess[2][4] = 'X';
    chess[2][6] = 'X';

    chess[3][1] = 'X';
    chess[3][3] = 'X';
    chess[3][5] = 'X';
    chess[3][7] = 'X';

    chess[4][0] = 'X';
    chess[4][2] = 'X';
    chess[4][4] = 'X';  // same
    chess[4][6] = 'X';

    chess[5][1] = 'X';
    chess[5][3] = 'X';
    chess[5][5] = 'X';  // same
    chess[5][7] = 'X';

    chess[6][0] = 'X';
    chess[6][2] = 'X';
    chess[6][4] = 'X';  //same
    chess[6][6] = 'X';

    chess[7][1] = 'X';
    chess[7][3] = 'X';  //same
    chess[7][5] = 'X';
    chess[7][7] = 'X';

    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < 8; i++) //printing out array
    {
        int j;
        for (j = 0; j < 8; j++)
            printf("%c",  chess[i][j]); //same
        printf("\n");
    }
    printf("\n");
    //system("pause");  //same
    return 0;  
}

Output:

XZXZXZXZ
ZXZXZXZX
XZXZXZXZ
ZXZXZXZX
XZXZXZXZ
ZXZXZXZX
XZXZXZXZ
ZXZXZXZX

For a more compact way of initializing, you could do:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>  

int main()

{
    char chess[8][8]; //using 2 dimensional array 

    for(int g=0; g<8; ++g)
        for (int t=0; t<8; ++t)
        {
            if (t % 2 == g % 2)
                chess[g][t] = 'X';
            else
                chess[g][t] = 'Z';
        }

    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < 8; i++) //printing out array
    {
        int j;
        for (j = 0; j < 8; j++)
            printf("%c",  chess[i][j]); //same
        printf("\n");
    }
    printf("\n");
    //system("pause");  //same
    return 0;  
}
  • I think that (1) and (2) are not errors themselves. OP wants to use a C string, not chars. – Eli Sadoff Nov 28 '16 at 18:13
  • Also (5) is a not a problem as well. const char * is the type for a C string. – Eli Sadoff Nov 28 '16 at 18:23
  • @EliSadoff - Well, in principle you could be right. But you don't want to print a chess board using strings. That would be odd. – 4386427 Nov 28 '16 at 18:23
  • It seems to me at least that OP set it up to be using strings. While that might not be the best choice, I don't think it's inherently wrong. – Eli Sadoff Nov 28 '16 at 18:24
  • @EliSadoff - Well, to me it does seem that OP wants chars. So under the assumption that OP wants chars, (5) is a problem. – 4386427 Nov 28 '16 at 18:30

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