7

This is what I have tried so far but with no success:

std::string ReadPartial( std::ifstream& _file, int _size )
{
    std::istreambuf_iterator<char> first( _file );
    std::istreambuf_iterator<char> last( _file );
    std::advance( last, _size );
    return std::string( first, last ); 
}

I know how to read the whole file.

std::string Read( std::ifstream& _file )
{
    std::istreambuf_iterator<char> first( _file );
    std::istreambuf_iterator<char> last();
    return std::string( first, last ); 
}

But this is not what i want to do. I'm getting an empty string. If I look at first and last in a debugger they point to the same thing even after the std::advance.

4
  • What’s the actual result that you’re seeing? Also, please post the real code that you used. The above code doesn’t even compile (EDIT: before Charles fixed it …). Nov 3, 2010 at 11:50
  • Ok fixed the compilation error.Sorry that was my bad. Was typing out of my head.
    – Alien_SM
    Nov 3, 2010 at 11:56
  • No need to use HTML, markdown works great.
    – Roger Pate
    Nov 3, 2010 at 12:13
  • By habit, I changed ifstream to istream in my answer, but it should be explicitly mentioned: pass file streams as istreams or ostreams (or, very rarely, iostreams) if you don't need the file-specific methods (open, close, etc.).
    – Roger Pate
    Nov 3, 2010 at 12:27

3 Answers 3

6

Is there some particular reason you want to use iterators? You could just read the bytes in one go:

std::string s(_size, '\0');
_file.read(&s[0], _size);

If you really want to read using iterators, you could do this:

std::string ReadPartial( std::ifstream& _file, int _size )
{
    std::istreambuf_iterator<char> first( _file );
    std::istreambuf_iterator<char> last;
    std::string s;
    s.reserve(_size);
    while (_size-- && first != last) s += *first++;
    return s;
}
5
  • No its not necessary. But would like to know if it is possible. Thanks for the answer
    – Alien_SM
    Nov 3, 2010 at 12:02
  • 2
    file.read(&s[0], size) is non-portable and unsafe. basic_string doesn't have vector's contiguous-storage guarantee.
    – Steve M
    Nov 3, 2010 at 16:02
  • @Steve: For what implementation is that true?
    – Roger Pate
    Nov 3, 2010 at 16:06
  • @Roger: I'd rather just not know, because the standard allows implementors to change it whenever they want. Why have abstractions if we're going to be encouraged to write code that assumes a certain implementation?
    – Steve M
    Nov 3, 2010 at 16:44
  • 2
    @Steve: Contiguous storage is required for string via indexing (what's missing is an explicit guarantee for iterators). 0x guarantees contiguous storage in all ways for std::string.
    – Roger Pate
    Nov 3, 2010 at 16:53
5
std::istreambuf_iterator<char> first( _file );
std::istreambuf_iterator<char> last( _file );
std::advance( last, _size );

istreambuf_iterators are Input Iterators. Once you advance last, the other iterator is modified too. You are treating them as Forward Iterators, which have the property that you can copy an iterator, advance it, then get an identical sequence by advancing the copy.

For the general case:

template<class InIter, class Size, class OutIter>
void copy_n(InIter begin, InIter end, Size n, OutIter dest) {
  for (; begin != end && n > 0; ++begin, --n) {
    *dest++ = *begin;
  }
}

//...
std::string ReadPartial(std::istream& file, int size) {
  std::string result;
  copy_n(istreambuf_iterator<char>(file), istreambuf_iterator<char>(),
         size, back_inserter(result));
  return result;
}

However, in this case, you would be better off resizing the string, using istream::read directly into &result[0], and finally checking that you read the desired number of characters.

2
  • But is there a way to do something similar using iterators, or for that matter to get a forward iterator from an ifstream?
    – Alien_SM
    Nov 3, 2010 at 12:08
  • @Allen_SM: Sure you can use iterators, I already included copy_n. You could write an iterator type for istreams which is a Forward Iterator (since istreams have a seekg method), but there's no need.
    – Roger Pate
    Nov 3, 2010 at 12:12
1

There is no standard algorithm that can help you here, but you can use this one:

template< class InputIterator, class OutputIterator>
OutputIterator copy_n(InputIterator from,
                      size_t n,
                      OutputIterator to)
{
    while (n)
    {
        *to = *from;
        ++from;
        ++to;
        --n;
    }
    return to;
}

This can be used with ReadPartial like this:

std::string ReadPartial( std::ifstream& _file, int _size )
{
    std::istreambuf_iterator<char> first( _file );
    std::string result;

    copy_n(first, _size, std::back_inserter(result));
    return result; 
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.