19

Is it acceptable/good-style to simplify this function:

bool TryDo(Class1 obj, SomeEnum type)
{
    if (obj.CanDo(type))
    {
        return Do(obj);
    }
    else
    {
        return false;
    }
}

as:

bool TryDo(Class1 obj, SomeEnum type)
{
    return obj.CanDo(type) && Do(obj);
}

The second version is shorter but arguably less intuitive.

11
  • 17
    Whatever makes it easy to read and maintain is the "best" way.
    – dotariel
    Nov 3, 2010 at 13:31
  • 12
    It depends: blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2010/02/01/…
    – jason
    Nov 3, 2010 at 13:50
  • 1
    @XSaint Good job stating the obvious, now the real question is which one is easier to read and maintain. The latter is very well explained in Jason's link! Nov 3, 2010 at 13:53
  • 5
    I would remove the parentheses around the return expression Nov 3, 2010 at 14:24
  • 5
    Also think about how hard it is to set breakpoints. Nov 3, 2010 at 15:50

20 Answers 20

65

What I would code is :

return obj.CanDo(type) ? Do(obj) : false;
18
  • 6
    This is the best answer so far. It is short but equivalent to the if/else (not just functionally equivalent, but semantically too). The only criticism I have is that I would remove the redundant parentheses.
    – Timwi
    Nov 3, 2010 at 13:38
  • 13
    This is slick and a nice one-line solution, but not very readable at all. Nov 3, 2010 at 13:43
  • 3
    I don't see why people gate on that ternary conditional. Looks good to me! Nov 3, 2010 at 13:46
  • 9
    @Zann readability depends strongly on practice. It's readable to everyone who has practiced reading this operator - which many programmers have. Readability of code is a rather elusive goal because of this... Nov 3, 2010 at 13:47
  • 6
    Please remove the extra parentheses
    – user24359
    Nov 3, 2010 at 14:21
24

Version with brackets:

bool TryDo(Class1 obj, SomeEnum type)
{
    if (obj.CanDo(type))
    {
        return Do(obj);
    }

    return false;
}

Or version without brackets (in answer comments is high debate about it):

bool TryDo(Class1 obj, SomeEnum type)
{
    /*
     * If you want use this syntax of
     * "if", this doing this on self
     * responsibility, and i don't want
     * get down votes for this syntax,
     * because if I remove this from my
     * answer, i get down votes because many
     * peoples think brackets i wrong.
     * See comments for more information.
     */
    if (obj.CanDo(type))
        return Do(obj);

    return false;
}

Your first code example is better, but I think my version is even better.

Your second version is not good readable and makes code harder to maintain, this is bad.

19
  • 4
    I like this version best. You could also remove the braces from the if-block to compact it a little more, but some people really dislike that. Nov 3, 2010 at 13:36
  • 2
    It's generally bad practice to leave braces off of if blocks, both for readability and maintainability. Nov 3, 2010 at 13:40
  • 2
    @Svisstack - it's less clear what exactly is and isn't part of the if block without the braces. Furthermore, if somebody comes along and adds code that's meant for the if block but misses adding the braces, you've now got a bug. Nov 3, 2010 at 13:42
  • 7
    @Zannjaminderson: that point is debatable. There is no consensus that leaving the braces off is bad. It certainly isn’t “bad practice”. If someone comes along and adds code, they also add the braces. Forgetting that isn’t a common mistake, in my experience. Nov 3, 2010 at 13:45
  • 4
    @Zann: that would require taking a vote. I don’t think it’s obvious that this style of code is less acceptable. In fact, I personally find it preferable to always putting the braces because like Jeff Atwood I experience screen space as a real estate and I hate wasting it with redundant empty lines (which are here introduced by the closing brace). Nov 3, 2010 at 14:01
18

The else is useless and the &&, however obvious, is not as readable as pure text.

I prefer the following:

bool TryDo(Class1 obj, SomeEnum type)
{
    if (obj.CanDo(type))
    {
        return Do(obj);
    }   
    return false;
}
1
  • +1 I was just about to post this exact method. I hate when all the returns are nested. It makes it less obvious that it "always" returns something, esp for the compiler.
    – JD Isaacks
    Nov 3, 2010 at 16:52
13

Yes.

Especially with names similar to your chosen names, i.e. CanDoSomething and DoSomething it is absolutely clear to any competent programmer what the second code does: “if and only if the condition holds, do something and return the result”. “if and only if” is the core meaning of the short-circuited && operator.

The first code is convoluted and unnecessarily long without giving any more information than the second code.

But in general, the two conditions may not form such an intimate relationship (as in CanDo and Do) and it might be better to separate them logically because putting them in the same conditional might not make intuitive sense.

A lot of people here claim that the first version is “much clearer”. I’d really like to hear their arguments. I can’t think of any.

On the other hand, there’s this closely related (although not quite the same) code:

if (condition)
    return true;
else
    return false;

this should always be transformed to this:

return condition;

No exception. It’s concise and still more readable to someone who is competent in the language.

5
  • 4
    Yes but OP want return something else, not condition result.
    – Svisstack
    Nov 3, 2010 at 13:41
  • Many programmers are not fully competent, any many more must deal with multiple languages over time where logical operators are sometimes handled differently. For this reason, I think the 2nd block is safer, if not clearer.
    – kaliatech
    Nov 3, 2010 at 13:53
  • 4
    @kaliatech: there’s a long shot between being “fully competent” and understanding the language basics. And I argue (strongly!) that we cannot always cater to beginners in clean code because the result will be convoluted, complicated and ultimately hard to maintain for professionals. If not for any other reason then because of the sheer code size. Yes, code size does matter. Nov 3, 2010 at 13:57
  • I like this answer (+1), though I am not sure that it is the correct one in a C# context. In C++ I would have no doubts. Relaying on well known language constructs and idioms improves clarity, in my opinion.
    – Gorpik
    Nov 3, 2010 at 14:08
  • I agree. The second is no harder to understand than the first, and the first has the disadvantage of being longer. I think code should be clear and consise. The second example meets both of those conditions.
    – Kendrick
    Nov 3, 2010 at 14:11
12

The shortened version hides the fact that Do does something. It looks like you're just doing a comparison and returning the result, but you're actually doing a comparison and performing an action, and it's not obvious that the code has this "side effect".

I think the core of the problem is that you're returning the result of an evaluation and the return code of an action. If you were returning the result of two evaluations in this way, I wouldn't have a problem with it

4
  • 1
    One more reason to choose good method names. If the method names are as clear as in the example, the fact that Do does something is very hard to hide. Furthermore, there is no comparison in the code. Nov 3, 2010 at 13:51
  • Comparison was probably a bit lazy, I grant you, though the && is effectively doing a bit wise comparison, so... I agree the method names would certainly help, but I'd still consider this a refactor too far Nov 3, 2010 at 13:55
  • 1
    “bitwise comparison”? What’s that? There is no IL instruction that is commonly described that way. Both ? : and && only ever compile into a brtrue or brfalse instruction, never a bgt, beq, etc., and most certainly not anything that is commonly called “bitwise” (such as and, which is not a comparison but an arithmetic instruction).
    – Timwi
    Nov 3, 2010 at 14:10
  • Damn it, lazy in my explanation of why I was lazy!! Bitwise was completely irrelevant - I meant comparing the two booleans. Perhaps I need a lie down... Nov 3, 2010 at 14:24
7

Another alternative that may be a bit more readable is using the conditional operator:

bool TryDo(Class1 obj, SomeEnum type) {
  return obj.CanDo(type) ? Do(obj) : false;
}
3
  • 3
    only if the conditional operator is used a lot in your code base. Nov 3, 2010 at 15:49
  • (it may depend on language but) I believe the correct term for that is "ternary operator"
    – JD Isaacks
    Nov 3, 2010 at 17:27
  • @John Isaacks: The term "ternary operator" only specifies that it's an operator that has three operands, while the term "conditional operator" specifies exactly what operator it is. In C# there is only one operator with three operands, but I still find it more useful to use a term that describes what the operator does, not only how many operators it uses. See also: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ternary_operation
    – Guffa
    Nov 3, 2010 at 17:39
6

The 1st version is much easier to read with less chance of being misunderstood, and I think that is important in real world code.

6

I do not like this design, and maybe not for the obvious reason. What bothers me is. return Do(obj); To me it makes no sense for the Do function to have a bool return type. Is this a substitute for property pushing errors up? Most likely this function should be void or returning a complex object. The scenario should simply not come up. Also if a bool somehow makes sense now, it can easily stop making sense in the future. With your code change it would require more re factoring to fix

2
  • 3
    Absolutely disagree. A method that has side-effects and returns a bool is completely normal and comes up all the time. Consider, for example, bool HashSet<T>.Add(). Your criticism makes too many assumptions about the OP’s code structure — from what little we’ve seen of it, it is perfectly reasonable.
    – Timwi
    Nov 3, 2010 at 13:49
  • Good points. I guess i would want that function called TryDo() Also in a way i am saying something similar to Kevin O'Donovan
    – Andrey
    Nov 3, 2010 at 20:04
5

In this case, I would go with the first option - it is much more readable and the intention of the code is much clearer.

0
5

Neither, because when TryDo returns False, you can't determine whether it was because 'Not CanDo' or 'Do returned False'.

I fully understand that you can ignore the result, but the way it's expressed implies that the result has meaning.

If the result is meaningless, the intent would be clearer with

void TryDo(Class1 obj, SomeEnum type)
{
    if (obj.CanDo(type))
        Do(obj);
    return;
}

If the result does have a meaning then there should be a way to differentiate between the two 'false' returns. I.E. What does 'If (!TryDo(x))' mean?

Edit: To put it another way, the OP's code is saying that 'I can't swim' is the same as 'I tried to swim and drowned'

0
4

I don't like the second version as I'm not really a fan of taking advantage of the order of sub-expression evaluation in a conditional expression. It's placing an expected ordering on sub-expressions which in my mind, should have equal precedence (even though they don't).

At the same time, I find the first version a bit bloated, so I'd opt for the ternary solution which I consider highly readable.

4

While it is certainly clear what the second code for a competent programmer, it would seem to me clearer and easier to read in a more general case to write the code like any other "if precondition satisfied, do action, else fail" style.

This could be achieved either by:

return obj.CanDo(type)? Do(obj) : false;

Or,

if(obj.CanDo(type)) return Do(obj);
return false;

I find this superior because this same style can be replicated no matter the return type. For example,

return (array.Length > 1)? array[0] : null;

Or,

return (curActivity != null)? curActivity.Operate() : 0;

The same style can also be expanded to situations that don't have a return value:

if(curSelection != null)
    curSelection.DoSomething();

My two cents.

4

IMO it's only OK if the second function has no side-effects. But since Do() has side-effects I'd go with the if.

My guideline is that an expression should not have side-effekts. When calling functions with a side-effect use a statement.
This guideline has a problem if a function returns a failurecode. In that case I accept assignment of that errorcode to a variable or directly returning it. But I don't use the return value in a complex expression. So perhaps I should say that only the outermost function call in an expression should have a side-effect.

See Eric Lippert's Blog for a longer explanation.

3

The side-effect problem that some people are mentioning is bogus. No one should be surprised that a method named "Do" has a side-effect.

The fact is, you are calling two methods. Both of those methods have bool as a return value. Your second option is very clear and concise. (Though I would get rid of the outer parenthesis and you forgot an ending semi-colon.)

1

Never do that. Keep it simple and intuitive.

6
  • 1
    The second code is simple and intuitive. If you disagree, please explain. Nov 3, 2010 at 13:38
  • simple as in easy to understand and maintain Nov 3, 2010 at 13:43
  • @Liviu: well then: the code is easy to understand and maintain. If you disagree, please explain. Nov 3, 2010 at 13:50
  • Look at the other posts on this thread and see for yourself, consider those answers my explanation. Nov 3, 2010 at 14:04
  • @Liviu: that’s the point though. They don’t explain either. :-( Nov 3, 2010 at 14:05
1

I might get hate for this but what about:

if (obj.CanDo(type)) return Do(obj);
return false;

I don't like having braces for one liners.

3
  • Not only does that have a redundant else, but it is very hard to read.
    – TimC
    Nov 3, 2010 at 13:58
  • @CrapHands Removed the else, though for me that makes it a bit less readable since my brain is basically adding an else there anyway.
    – Radu
    Nov 3, 2010 at 14:05
  • I don't like putting the then part of the if on the same line as the if. Just add a linebreak before the return DO() Nov 3, 2010 at 14:59
1

For me, I prefer the second method. Most of my methods that return bool are shortened in the same manner when simple conditional logic is involved.

1

I think that the Class1 Type should determine if it can do, given a SomeEnum value.

I would leave the decision on whether or not it can handle the input for it to decide:

bool TryDo(Class1 obj, SomeEnum type)
{
    return obj.Do(type));    
}
2
  • But then the call to Do(obj) is lost
    – KevinDTimm
    Nov 3, 2010 at 14:32
  • @KevinDTimm Correct, I meant to have the return be return obj.Do(type)); obj should decide if it can or not fulfil the task, return false otherwise
    – TimC
    Nov 3, 2010 at 14:47
1

No. The second version

return (obj.CanDo(type) && Do(obj))

relies on the short-circuiting behavior of the && operator which is an optimization, not a method to control program flow. In my mind this is only slightly different than using exceptions for program flow (and almost as bad).

I hate clever code, it's a bitch to understand and debug. The goal of the function is "if we can do this, then do it and return the result else return false." The original code makes that meaning very clear.

2
  • you have misunderstood the purpose of short-circuiting. It’s not primarily an optimization (if at all, this is just a side-effect). Consequently, your whole argument is wrong. Nov 3, 2010 at 16:12
  • @Konrad - what makes you say that? It's certainly an optimization, I assume it was intended as such but don't know. I am certain that it was not intended to control program flow.
    – Jamie Ide
    Nov 3, 2010 at 17:17
1

There are several good answers already, but I thought I would show one more example of (what I consider) good, readable code.

bool TryDo(Class1 obj, SomeEnum type)
{
    bool result = false;

    if (obj.CanDo(type))
    {
        result = Do(obj);
    }

    return result;
}

Keep or remove the curly brackets back around the body of the if statement according to taste.

I like this approach because it illustrates that the result is false unless something else happens, and I think it more clearly shows that Do() is doing something and returning a boolean, which TryDo() uses as its return value.

1
  • I agree you! At the same time it allows you the set up a "default" return value and having one exit point it will be very easy to debug as well Nov 16, 2010 at 14:14

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.