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I am trying to perform an addition on a double atomically in a loop using a compare and exchange scheme with this function:

namespace my
{
    template<typename value_type>
    value_type atomic_add(std::atomic<value_type>& operand, value_type value_to_add)
    {
        value_type old = operand.load(std::memory_order_consume);
        value_type desired = old + value_to_add;
        while (!operand.compare_exchange_weak(old, desired, std::memory_order_release, std::memory_order_consume))
            desired = old + value_to_add;

        return desired;
    }
}

This is used in my code like so:

[ size of containers = 62, scalar = 318.0, values in containers between 0.0 and 55.0, all values are of type double ]

for(size_t i = 0; i < container.size(); i++)
{
    my::atomic_add<double>(Q, container2[i] - std::pow(container3[i], 2) / scalar);
}

The output is 0.57784502195324539.

However, replacing all my_atomic with the += operator, and replace all std::atomic<double> with double gives 0.52something, which is closer to what I was expecting.

Any idea why this is happening?

Thank you.

  • Welcome back to Stack Overflow! :) I think we will need a minimal reproducible example to figure this one out. – mindriot Nov 30 '16 at 6:57
  • Will provide, thank you! – Vicksters Nov 30 '16 at 7:00
  • Can't you use std::atomic_fetch_add ? – Arunmu Nov 30 '16 at 7:09
  • @Arunmu Unfortunately not; std::atomic_fetch_add only works for integral types. In this case I need floats. – Vicksters Nov 30 '16 at 21:29
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I seem to have fixed this issue so I am going to post an answer as a cautionary tale for other developers.

Here is a minimal working example:

#include <iostream>

#include <atomic>
#include <vector>

namespace my
{
    template<typename value_type>
    value_type atomic_add(std::atomic<value_type>& operand, value_type value_to_add)
    {
        value_type old = operand.load(std::memory_order_consume);
        value_type desired = old + value_to_add;
        while (!operand.compare_exchange_weak(old, desired, std::memory_order_release, std::memory_order_consume))
            desired = old + value_to_add;

        return desired;
    }
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<double> vector;

    for(int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
    {
        double a;
        a = 2.0;
        vector.push_back(a);
    }

    std::atomic<double> d;

    for(int i = 0; i < vector.size(); i++)
        my::atomic_add(d, vector[i]);

    std::cout << d << std::endl;
}

The output of which is 202. It appears that d is initialized to 2.0. The moral of this story is to always make sure that your std::atomics are initialized to a sane value.

Furthermore, other answers have pointed out that it is generally a bad idea to store std::atomicss in a vector as they are not CopyAssignable and CopyConstructible.

  • 1
    I would recommend you edit your question to contain the example. The real reason for your problem, then, is undefined behavior: as you noticed, std::atomic's default ctor does not initialize the data. d happens to be 2.0 because the value happens to already be in that stack location from the previous loop (double a held the same place). If you change your code to a = 4.0, you'll likely get 404 as a result. But that is just what your compiler happens to do; really, you're just seeing UB. – mindriot Nov 30 '16 at 22:05
  • See also stackoverflow.com/questions/36320008/… (your post turns out to be a duplicate). – mindriot Nov 30 '16 at 22:06
  • @mindriot I will amend accordingly; It does turn out to be a duplicate, however my first suspicion was that this was a fringe floating-point error. Looking back this was a naive assumption. – Vicksters Nov 30 '16 at 22:57

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